Religious Sites in Florence

Religious Sites in Florence, Italy

Religious Sites in Florence

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What travelers are saying

  • Oldjack
    Greater Melbourne, Australia26,653 contributions
    It is a large and majestic building from outside but quite difficult to enter unless you line up and even then the signs were confusing and you may not end up where you wanted to go.Construction commenced at the end of the 13th century and is large and unique. If you like crowds this is for you. Better planning need next time
    Written September 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Ozan Karahan
    Krakow, Poland1,504 contributions
    There are several historical religious buildings in Florence. In my opinion, this one is the most beautiful, although others seem to be more popular. It is located on a hill, with very nice views of the city.
    Written June 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • fred
    Hereford, UK12 contributions
    The climb up the tower is quite a challenge 400 hundred steps plus! There are plenty of stages to rest so take your time. Not a lot to see inside as the main event is at the top! Excellent views all over Florence and close up views of the Duomo. Towards the top the stairs can get quite narrow but easily passable.
    Written August 17, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Ozan Karahan
    Krakow, Poland1,504 contributions
    Basilica di San Lorenzo is one of the oldest religious buildings in the world, one of the most important sightseeing places in Florence.
    Written June 28, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Shoppingmom1221
    Woodbury, NY15 contributions
    Do not miss this when you visit Florence! We purchased a combined ticket for entry to this, the Duomo Museum and the Duomo crypt. All three are definitely worth seeing. To enter the Duomo itself, no ticket is required, but the line is daunting. Buy this ticket! Once in the Duomo crypt, you can enter directly into the Duomo Cathedral. We had no idea that we could basically skip the line and see the ancient ruins beneath the Duomo!
    Written September 25, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • MikesWanders
    Charlotte, NC101 contributions
    This museum / church is one of the highlights of our trip to Florence. It is a place that we have walked by dozens of times on prior visits and not even given a second look to. I learned of it by listening to a podcast called Rebuilding the Renaissance by coincidence shortly before we decided to book this trip.

    The church itself is pretty much meh. Nothing to see here really. But, their times visits include a mandatory 20 minutes in the church before being allowed to go to the museum. (I would recommend finding the podcast episode that talks about each of the statues and using that as a guide. while some of the details have changed since it was recorded, the status have not).

    The museum houses the original statues except for two Donatellos (one is at the Bargello and the other at Santa Croce I think..maybe SMN). There were so few people visiting this site and they rushed through very quickly. We spent the maximum time allowed in the part with the statues and it was a great experience being the only ones there.

    I don't think this would have been nearly as interesting if we had not had our own audio guide / professor talking to us. It went from what would have been another church and more statues to something very interesting and memorable.
    Written July 19, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • top-trippers
    Bolton, UK592 contributions
    This was one of my personal favourites whilst in Florence. You can only see as part of a pre-booked accompanied visit (10 people max). You need to arrive in good time as they shut the door promptly. Whilst you can only stay for 25 minutes, this is enough time to see Masaccio and Masolino’s famous fresco cycle and take a quick peek inside the main church. At the moment the chapel is full of three levels of scaffolding accessed via steps. Whilst this is not great if you want to take lots of photos, it does give you a really close-up view of the frescoes. There are no information cards or audio-guide and your ‘minder’ won’t offer up any background. For me, on-line booking was a nightmare and I almost gave up. Opening times seem to change regularly and the changes are not advertised in advance. Online tickets go on sale on the 18th of the previous month (e.g. tickets for July are available from 18th June). When checking availability, if the calendar search doesn’t work, circumvent by over-keying the dates manually. A ‘no availability’ response can be misleading – tickets may have sold out, but it could also mean that reservations haven’t been released yet. It could also indicate that the chapel is closed on the dates in question. Persevere - it is worth it! If you speak Italian – book by telephone.

    The 12 restored Branacci Chapel frescoes (two featuring Adam and Eve, the other ten showing scenes from the life of St. Peter) are said to mark the start of Renaissance painting and were a major influence on the likes of the younger Michelangelo and Botticelli. Masolini designed and began the frescoes around 1424, assisted by his 21-year pupil Masaccio, who later took charge of the project. Work stalled for a while – partly because Masaccio was called to work in Rome (where he died aged just 27), and also because the sponsors were expelled from Florence by the Medici. The Branacci later returned and the painting was completed by Filippino Lippi as his first major work. The original ceiling frescoes, along with the lunettes which once contained four more scenes by Masolini, were lost after being painted over during a redecoration of the church in the 18th century. The cycle contains various Renaissance innovations in painting (the use of perspective; composite scenes; and the restaging of historical events in a familiar landscape).

    Masolino’s composite St. Peter Healing a Cripple and the Raising of Tabitha Is thought to be the first use of a central vanishing point in painting. His style was still heavily Gothic – the figures in his Temptation of Adam and Eve are elegant, pale, and delicate and the snake is stylised with a human face and thick blond hair. This contrasts with Masaccio’s Expulsion of Adam and Eve with its more solid and vivid colours, bold strokes and gradual lightening of tones to create the impression of ‘light and shade’ and perspective. Like Giotto before him, Masaccio sought to introduce realism by depicting humans as individuals with different stances and expressions (often dramatically emotional) - his Adam and Eve seem hunched in shame and anguish. Realism is enhanced by lots of added minor details, particularly evident in his Baptism of the Neophytes - the muscles, dripping hair, and the water swirling round the knees. His Tribute Money is another standout. Here, Lippo deliberately adopted Masaccio’s style but he added his trademark contemporary portraits amongst the bystanders - in his composite Disputation with Simon Magus and Crucifixion of St Peter, you can see Lippi himself (the youth with a beret on the extreme left), as well as his friend and teacher Sandro Botticelli (the young man below the archway looking towards the viewer).
    Written August 18, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Marc_and_Kim_Z
    Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Germany2,140 contributions
    It doesn’t take long to see it all but we’ll worth the trip. The museum is above the synagogue.

    The synagogue is beautiful. Late 1800’s opening.

    If you are into history this is for you.
    Written June 21, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Oldjack
    Greater Melbourne, Australia26,653 contributions
    This Franciscan church located in the square of the same name was one ofthe more elaborate and interesting churches visited. The original church dates back to the 1250's and was larter remoddlled in 1627. You can spend some time here and there are many rooms and areas to view andtheart work is elaborate and interesting
    Written September 11, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Oldjack
    Greater Melbourne, Australia26,653 contributions
    The church built in 1250 with some changes over time was elaborate with great art work. It is said a Friar Bartolomeo despaired he could paint a virgin with a beautiful enough face and went to sleep on the job and when he woke the painting had been completed.(by an Angel). The painting is on display (but missed) and one of many in this elaborate church
    Written September 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Chris B
    Arlington, VA152 contributions
    Wonderful frescoes in the Cappella Sassetti :) and you have to pay to have the chapel illuminated but it's worth it. The frescoes seem to have been recently restored and the colors are fantastic. It's only a small chapel but be prepared to be amazed by Domenico Ghirlandaio's artistic genius.
    Written September 30, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • JohnRegoPark
    Rego Park, NY970 contributions
    The Brancacci Chapel is the reason most people come to the church, and it must be accessed from a door to the right of the facade. The church itself is not without interest. The baroque illusionistic ceiling is a wonder as are the wonderful side chapels. You can peek into the Brancacci from the church itself, but you really cannot see the frescoes well unless you book a ticket at the ticket booth for a separate entrance into the chapel. If you are going to the chapel itself, you would do well to catch the rest of the church.
    Written March 22, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Gregory W
    Mankato, MN3,095 contributions
    Tucked away from the chaos, discover this lovely church. It is peaceful. The church is lovely inside and the perfect opportunity to refresh.
    Written March 15, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SoCalOregonian
    Murrieta, CA9,916 contributions
    This church, located just off a main street between Stazione di Santa Maria Novella and the Duomo complex. It is dated from the 8th century and rebuilt in the 13th century. It has a central Nave separated from the aisles by pointed arches. There are many frescos attributed to both Cione and Nardo. This seems to be a rarely visited church in a city of many churches.
    Written September 7, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Julia Bolton H
    3 contributions
    This is one my favourite places in Florence. Go to it after visiting the Fra Angelicos in San Marco. It is free and very beautiful, a fine place to sit in a Savonarola chair and contemplate the Andrea del Castagno Las Supper painted for a convent's refectory. You don't pay to enter the second room, just sign the guest book in the first room. It's entered by the last door of the pink building on your left as you turn down towards the Fortezza from the San Domenica Fra angelico Museum.
    Written August 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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