Architectural Buildings in Sicily

THE 10 BEST Sicily Architectural Buildings

Architectural Buildings in Sicily

Types of Attractions
Sights & Landmarks
Sights & Landmarks
Traveler rating
Neighborhoods
Good for
438 places sorted by traveler favorites
  • Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
Showing results 1-30 of 438

What travelers are saying

  • Jeremy R
    4 contributions
    Interesting place with lots of history, don't bother with the holographic room, but the other rooms were worth a visit. Only one toilet in the whole place by the entrance and costs 50c
    Written January 3, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Ros0604
    London, UK291 contributions
    This was a fascinating visit - really interesting history and building, filled with lovely things. Excellent tour. Wonderful that it is still a home, lived in and loved. Highly recommend this visit. Allow time to find it - fairly neat the cathedral but in the backstreets
    Written September 23, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • AMsays
    Thornhill, Canada4,121 contributions
    The building was built over Roman Baths in 1086 but since then it has gone through many renovations, rebuilt mainly because of natural disasters and aggressions. It has been presided over by the French, Swabians, Normans but initially by Byzantine forces who it is believed absconded with artifacts from here that ended up at Istanbul’s Hagia Sofia mosque. The outer façade is topped by a bell tower. Inside there are the usual religious artifacts, statues and beautiful artwork. I was very impressed with the striking flooring.
    Written February 8, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Carlos L.
    Palm Desert, CA1,589 contributions
    Beautiful square beautiful city. The open space the imposing beautiful cathedral and the glow of the stone by the intense beautiful Sicilian sun. This is a great square we loved it
    Written July 8, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • HollisBrooke
    Berlin, Germany667 contributions
    I can imagine it would be a huge pain to visit here in the high season, but we came in May. You have to park about a five to ten minute walk away in a paid lot. The prices seem like they go up or down depending on if it’s the high season or not. The walk down to the sea is a bit steep but they’ve done a nice job making it accessible for pedestrians, eking out a nice trail for everyone to walk down.

    My parents are in their late sixties and managed fine both ways. Our four year old had to be carried the way back, but that’s to be expected. This place by the sea is breathtaking but not so huge. There are free chairs but I’m sure they get taken up quickly in July and august. The bathrooms are nice and there is a small cafe.

    It was a bit (a lot) cold to swim, in my opinion, but people were! My daughter enjoyed climbing on the rocks, so it wasn’t particularly relaxing for me as the sea there was quite choppy the day we were there. But I imagine with older kids or no kids that this would be really relaxing to read a book in a chair and sunbathe, or have an invigorating swim before heading back up to check out the town of Scopello.
    Written June 9, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Matt H
    London, UK51 contributions
    Beautiful church and really interesting to see the monastery and how the nuns lived up until 2014
    The cost of entry is a little steep compared to others in the city, but we went to many churches and this was our favourite and worth the visit.. To top it off you get fantastic view from the roof top of the whole city a chance to relax in the courtyard and buy the most delicious cannoli ever
    Written October 10, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Leif B
    Pietarsaari, Finland2,795 contributions
    We were on a guided tour in Ragusa and visited this beautiful baroque church. The cathedral appears in the opening credits of the Italian TV series Inspector Montalbano, and it also features in some episodes, as does the similarly named cathedral of Modica. I am a fan of Inspector Montalbano, so it was nice to visit his ”church”. Before the earthquake of 1693, the Church of San Giorgio stood in the eastern part of Ragusa Ibla, near the Hyblean Garden. Today, the only thing left from the ancient church, demolished in 1718, is the Portal of San Giorgio.After the earthquake of 1693, which destroyed almost entirely the historical center of the town, it was decided to built a new church dedicated to Saint George on the place of the ancient Church of San Nicola.However, the building of Ragusa Superiore – the modern part of the city, developed faster, and the Cathedral of San Giovanni Battista, erected in 1694, became the main Catholic church of Ragusa, to the discontent of the inhabitants of Ragusa Ibla.
    Written June 6, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • S E
    Burgess Hill, UK142 contributions
    A wonderful Palazzo in central Catania, very beautiful and interesting. There are several beautiful rooms to explore and wander around, no guide or signage in any of the rooms but there was a guided tour. However we decided just to mooch around ourselves. Lots of photo opportunities and an escape from the heat of the day.
    Written October 8, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jimvin
    Caterham, UK957 contributions
    Not a long visit on this one as the second floor was closed off. The English guide had lots of information, and I was disappointed I could not go to the second floor as it sounded interesting. I am not sure of the reason. Some of the rooms are incredible, some are tired and in need of restoration, and there was a wonderful fountain in the middle courtyard. You can buy a combo ticket for two close by museums. Not expensive. Allow 45 mins to one hour on this Palazzo.
    Written April 14, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • duhoz
    Beroun, Czech Republic6,313 contributions
    Roman Baroque Catholic church and attached female convent. Damaged by the 1990 earthquake and repaired by 2012. The favourite time of the visit is around sunset to climb up to the base of the dome allows for views of the city and the looming Etna volcano, if not cloudy or dusty weather, for 5 Euro. Definitely worth of climb.
    Written November 2, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Outofdodge_10
    Santa Fe, NM1,351 contributions
    The Palazzo Nicolaci is a baroque palace built in the 1700's with gorgeous, curved, wrought-iron balconies with carved lions, sphinxes, hippogriffs, winged horses, angels and sirens underneath. The interior features frescoed ceilings. It belonged to the Nicolachi family who acquired their fortune from the tuna industry. It's been renovated since having been taken over by Noto. It's an interesting look inside the life of a wealthy Sicilian family.
    Written October 7, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Outofdodge_10
    Santa Fe, NM1,351 contributions
    I really loved the worn look of Chiesa di San Nicolo All'Arena and it's doubtful the facade will ever be completed. It was built in the late 1600's and, as with many buildings in Sicily, took a hit from an earthquake. It was reconstructed in 1735. There is an adjoining Benedictine Monastery (Monastery di San Nicolò l'Arena) that holds the title of the second largest monastery in Europe. The interior includes a sundial and organ. I especially enjoyed the wide columns. And climb to the top so you have a panoramic view.
    Written October 28, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Silvia L
    London, UK2 contributions
    This must be one of the most unique art experiences in Europe. A huge range of art, architecture and objets d'art, from different periods and places. The environment is gorgeous. The atmosphere calm and grand without being imposing. The building is so beautiful And both restaurants are a must for great locally sourced sicilian cuisine.
    Written September 19, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Geoffrey P
    Exeter31 contributions
    Beautiful restored theatre located at far end of Via Atenea. Unfortunately no performances in September.
    Written September 27, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Brun066
    Florence, Italy12,481 contributions
    The Cathedral of Acireale shows a noble aspect, accentuated by the alternately light and dark color of the stones used in the facade, and by the scenic square which borders with it on the south side.
    The style of the facade appears difficult to define even for those having some notion of architectural history. In fact, the part surrounding the main portal was built at the end of the 17th century (in particular the sculptural group above the portal, the "Annunciation" dates from 1668-1672), while the tower on the right side of the facade was begun at the time of the substantial reconstruction of the church (on the foundations of an older and more humble church) in the mid-16th century. Therefore, despite the appearances of this tower (which recall the so-called Arab-Norman style) there is nothing properly medieval here. As for the left tower, the loggia with small columns and the rose window, they are even a "neo-Gothic" construction from the 1880s.
    This chronology well reflects the history of Acireale, whose conspicuous size and prosperity is late: it dates after 1528, the year in which, under the reign of Emperor Charles V in Sicily, through the payment of a conspicuous sum Acireale acquired the status of "state-owned city", i.e. not subject to any feudal lord, but directly to the king (hence its name). Suffice it to say that in 1669 (the date of the eruption of Etna which partially invested Catania) Acireale had 11,000 inhabitants, therefore slightly less than the 16,000 of Catania.
    The interior of the church is clearly of late Baroque style (therefore after the disastrous earthquake of 1693). I would like to underline just a few salient features of this interior.
    The frescoes on the vault of the right transept and on the walls of the left transept, by Pietro Paolo Vasta, a notable painter from Acireale (1697-1760) depict respectively the "Glory of Santa Venera", the killing of Abel and the sacrifice of Isaac.
    The Chapel of Santa Venera, still in the right transept, with exuberant sculptural decoration, is evidence of the veneration of the inhabitants of Acireale for this patron saint of the city. The fact that the de facto existence of the saint has recently been so questioned by the Catholic Church, as to lead to her exclusion from the latest edition (2004) of the official document called "Martyrologium Romanum", evidently has little influence on this cult.
    In the first span of the left aisle of the church, the sumptuous "fercolo", i.e. the triumphal chariot on which the statue of Santa Venera is transported through the town every 26 July, also bears witness to this cult.
    Finally, in the floor of the transept, the sundial created by the Danish mathematician Friedrich Peters in 1843 (as far as I know assisted by the German geologist Wolfgang Sartorius, a distinguished scholar of Etna) doesn't escape attention.
    Overall, this Cathedral (bishop's seat since 1872) deserves an unhurried visit, as it's a strong element of the city's identity, as well as of its architectural skyline.
    Written August 9, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
Frequently Asked Questions about Sicily