Monuments/ Statues in Venice

Top Monuments & Statues in Venice, Italy

Monuments & Statues in Venice

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What travelers are saying

  • godsmonkey
    Mitaka, Japan122 contributions
    I visited Punta della Dogana on the last day of0 "Bruce Nauman: Contrapposto Studies" in November 2021. Both the area and the museum were not crowded at all (probably due mainly to the COVID situation, but also because of the location which is at the edge of the Dorsoduro district), So I enjoyed the exhibition without being annoyed by other visitors presence.

    The minimalistic renovating intervention by Japanese architect Tadao Ando is very much restrained and successfully revitalizes the old voluminous envelope of the building, seemingly suitable for mega-scale artworks such as presented in the Nauman exhibition, with the concrete volumes inserted do not stand out by themselves but effectively divide/connect the exhibition cells. It is not too big - probably1 to 1.5hour is enough to see everything. For architects and architecture lovers, this may be worth visiting.
    Written November 27, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Graham S
    Tewantin, Australia4,267 contributions
    "2 or 3 columns with a statue
    Some people believe however that there was supposed to be a third column besides the ones with San Teodoro and the San Marco lion. Apparently, three columns were delivered by boat to Venice in 1172. During the process of moving them from the boat to the shore, one column fell overboard into the lagoon. A team of researchers has recently started to search the lagoon between the Marciana library and the Ponte della Paglia (in front of the Bridge of Sighs). And who knows? Maybe the city of Venice will soon have a third granite column."
    This has been lifted from the Venice Insider ... a place well worth finding out some intimate extra details on San Marco. Whats the connection with David Bowie?
    Written February 1, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • JaakkoTapio
    Helsinki, Finland577 contributions
    As the whole area of Venice is full of architecture especially seen in buildings, it's not big surprise that there is less monuments of historical people. But many of them also can be found, also inside. Vittorio Emmanuel II's monument is easy to find when walking around San Marco, and if you happen to arrive via vaporetto's. Many details can be realize how (slowly) this kind of sculptures have been during when they were made and stood.
    Written February 17, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • alisoncesaro
    Melbourne, Australia14 contributions
    One of the many small churches you can find walking around Venice. Absolutely stunning historical arts & sculptures for a minor charge.
    Written October 14, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • SoCalOregonian
    Murrieta, CA9,812 contributions
    This memorial with statue atop a large pedestal is in the eponymous Campo of BASILICA SANTI GIOVANNI E PAOLO. The bronze horseman is Bartolomeo Collenoi, a mercenary who left money for the construction of this statue and was completed in 1488.
    Written April 1, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Mairwen1
    United Kingdom6,324 contributions
    We came to look at Church San Giacomo, Venice's oldest church with beautiful 24 hour clock. However, my favourite thing here was the statue of Il Gobbo Di Rialto (the Hunchback). You could very easily miss him but once you’ve spotted him, you feel like you’ve discovered one of those little hidden gems that you sometimes stumble across when travelling.
    He is only 3 minutes from the Rialto Bridge so very easy to get to. To find him, look across from the church for the granite sculpture of a naked man hunched over, supporting a small flight of steps and a pedestal on his back.
    Unfortunately there isn’t any information or plaque to let you know the significance of poor old Il Gobbo.
    However this is where the Doges’ messengers stood to read out the news of the day to the people and to make official proclamations. It's why Shylock (in Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice) asks “What news on the Rialto?”
    Il Gobbo was also used in the punishment of minor criminals, like thieves. As an alternative to jail, they could be stripped naked, then have to run from Piazza San Marco to the Rialto. Once then they made it to Il Gobbo, their punishment ended when they kissed the statue. Having seen those awful prison cells at the Doge’s Palace only the day before, I can’t see why you wouldn't have chosen this punishment every time over going to jail. I guess it wasn’t exactly a soft option because crowds would line the streets and jeer and throw things at you but hey, no-one was going to be able to post photos of you on social media so I still think it was the better option.
    Written August 4, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • papadopoulosgeorge61
    20 contributions
    Nice scalpture outside of the palace for pictures but i think 25euro per person to enter the palace is a big amount.
    Written December 7, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Estueban
    Perugia, Italy2,693 contributions
    This statue pays tribute to one of the biggest playwrighter of Italian history. It dominates the square likewise did Goldoni with the italian theatre.
    Written April 30, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • SoCalOregonian
    Murrieta, CA9,812 contributions
    This statue of Manin is located in the Campo named for him, across a canal from the house in which he lived. This is one stop of many on the Daniele Manin pilgrimage trail in Venice. The statue is of bronze atop a stone pedestal, which at the base is a large winged lion.
    Written November 21, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Mark42139
    New York City, NY1,440 contributions
    These stolpersteine or stumbling stones have the names of those who lived here and were killed in the Holocaust. It's very sad to see, but a poignant and important reminder.
    Written July 5, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Robert O
    Rotterdam, The Netherlands3,128 contributions
    Erected in 1921, long after his death in 1882, Garibaldi was respectfully honoured with this statue at the Biennale Gardens in Venice. Unlike other fathers of the Italian nation, Garibaldi was a left-leaning republican. He was pragmatic enough to work together with autocrats and the king of Sardinia (Victor Emanuel II) in order to achieve his prime goal: the unification of Italy.

    Most historians agree that Garibaldi was more effective in establishing the Italian state than Victor Emanuel II who has a much bigger statue in Venice and still at a much more prominent place near piazza San Marco.
    Written October 30, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Alessandro F
    Milan, Italy25,624 contributions
    In the middle of Campo Santo Stefano , stands this statue in memorial of Niccolò Tommaseo ( 1802-1874 ).
    He was a writer and a patriot , contemporary of Daniele Manin .
    He was the author of the first dictionary of the Italian language and the first author of dictionary of synonyms and antonyms.
    Written January 1, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Asiyah Noemi K
    Pula, Croatia4,675 contributions
    Leone del Pireo (The Piraeus Lion) is one of four lion statues on display at the Venetian Arsenal, where it was displayed as a symbol of Venice's patron saint, San Marco ( Saint Mark ). Their beauty and strength impresses at the entrance to the shipyard. It fits nicely into the ambiance, the walls, the towers, the bridges inside the shipyard and the bridge over the Rio dell Arsenale. It was originally located in Piraeus, the harbor of Athens. It was looted by Venetian naval commander Francesco Morosini in 1687 as a plunder taken in the Great Turkish War against the Ottoman Empire, during which the Venetians captured Athens and Morosini's cannons caused damage to the Parthenon that was matched only by his subsequent sack of the city. The lion was originally sculpted in about 360 BC, which is made of white marble and stands some 3 m (9 ft.) High. The lion was a well-known monument in Piraeus, where it had been from the 1st or 2nd century. Its fame was such that the Italians called the port of Porto Leone. It is especially known for the fact that some Scandinavians in the second half of the 11th century illegally desecrated a lion statue, they carved two long runic inscriptions on the shoulders and sides of the lion. But the imposing beautiful statues of lions still failed to be destroyed.
    Written April 24, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • wherewego.cityhideout
    Zagreb, Croatia1,540 contributions
    This church is one of the many in Venice, and comparing to others major churches is not so special. Small Charming church.
    Written June 26, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Robert O
    Rotterdam, The Netherlands3,128 contributions
    Few people visiting Venice did not pass by the statue of Paolo Sarpi as it is en route from the stations to piazza San Marco.

    Rather unknown to most, Sarpi (1552 – 1623) was not insignificant. He played a prominent role during the early 1600s in laying the foundation of modern Europe. His ideas about the need for separation of State and Religion are now widely accepted, but during his lifetime led to several assassination attempts instigated by the pope of Rome. Sarpi was a keen supporter of science, colleague and friend of Galilei and other scholars around Europe. He did not regard protestants as heretics and promoted tolerance. Truly a man to be honoured.
    Written October 30, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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