Government Buildings in Venice

Government Buildings in Venice, Italy

Government Buildings in Venice

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What travelers are saying

  • SoCalOregonian
    Murrieta, CA10,394 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    This palace sits just north of and at the western footing of the Rialto Bridge facing the Grand Canal. It dates from the late 1400’s and as built it has retained its function as office spaces for various governmental departments. It is currently home to the Comptroller and Auditor General. On the 1st floor, facing the canal is an inscription to Andrea Gritto dedicating the 1st and 2nd floors in 1525; I did not see any availability for public access
    Written November 23, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • 🥳 🎉 🥳 Keep Life Simple 🥳🎉🥳
    Pittsburgh, PA118,556 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Palazzo Dolfin Manin was closed when we were there on a Monday. It is located not far from the Rialto Vaporetto stop.
    Written November 17, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Vikas Singh
    Ghaziabad, India4,144 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This was designed by Jacopo Sansovino in the period 1536-1545 as part of the re-organization of St. Mark’s Square ordered by Doge Andrea Gritti. It is built from solid blocks of Istrian marble. Since the mint formerly had ovens with high temperature and posed a risk of fire, little wood was used in construction. Even after the fall of the Venetian Republic the building continued to function as a mint up until 1870. Now it houses the reading-rooms of the Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana.
    Written June 21, 2016
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Scott
    76 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Great situation and historic place to get married. The balcony presents a great photo opportunity for the newly weddings against a historic backdrop of the Grand Canal and Rialto Bridge
    Written October 18, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • globtrotteuse
    France155,009 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The historic building of Ca 'Corner houses the offices of the Prefecture - Territorial Office of the Government of Venice. For this reason the building is visible only externally. Without a doubt to photograph and admire during a trip by vaporetto.
    Written October 1, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SoCalOregonian
    Murrieta, CA10,394 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    This palace originally belonged to the Loredan family then was bought by the Condulmer family whom Pope Eugenio IV was a member. It is currently home to the Austrian Consulate and the Honorary German Consulate. The building consists of 3 stories and is topped with a semicircular pediment with a window in it. The 1st floor has a balcony across 3 windows and the 2nd floor has individual balustrades in front of each window as with the window in the pediment. Overall, a very non-descript building except for the fact that it is utilized as a consulate.
    Written November 15, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • globtrotteuse
    France155,009 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Palazzo dei Dieci Savi is a palace on the Canal Grande, Venice, northern Italy. It is included in the sestiere (quarter) of San Polo, and is not far from the Rialto Bridge, on the opposite side than the Palazzo dei Camerlenghi.

    It was built in the first half of the 16th century, under design of Antonio Abbondi. It was the seat of the Dieci Savi alle Decime, the magistrate who cared the finances of the Republic of Venice, maintaining this function until the end of the latter in 1797. Until 2014 it housed the city's water officers (Magistrato alle Acque).

    The palace has a longer façade on the Ruga (alley) degli Osei and a shorter one on the Canal Grande. The former has a portico with 37 arcades, whose ceiling, with cross vaults, is covered by frescoes, most of which are preserved in a good state.

    The two upper floors, divided by two thick frames, feature 37 mullioned windows with undecorated stone frames. At the top, is a notched frame in correspondence with the attic. The façade on the canal is similar: it has four arcades at the bottom and five couples of rectangular mullioned windows at the upper floors.

    The two only decorative elements are 16th century statue of the Justice (second floor) at the corner, and a bas-relief with a Lion of St Mark (1848), dating to the short lived Republic of St Mark (1848).
    Written October 17, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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