Religious Sites in Milan

Religious Sites in Milan, Italy

Religious Sites in Milan

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What travelers are saying

  • Mary Jo G
    Greenfield, WI35 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    We weren't able to see the inside of the Duomo during our first visit to Milan a few years ago due to crazy long lines, so this was a must-see for us when we returned for a second visit. We bought our tickets online a few months ahead of time directly through the Duomo ticket office. After doing my research, I had determined that the "Fast track private tour Cathedral, Archaeological area and Rooftops" tour for just the 4 of us offered the best value for just a few more euro than similar large group tours offered by other tour operators. We got so much more out of the tour than we would have in a larger group. We never felt rushed, and we were able to have a continuous conversation with our incredibly knowledgeable guide the entire time. It is a fantastic building and walking along the rooftops was especially amazing. The archeological area is also very interesting. It is below the cathedral and is done without the guide, so you can stay as long as you want. If you love seeing all the different cathedrals throughout Europe, I highly recommend this tour!
    Written June 21, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • lisabinnyc
    New York City, NY592 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I admit, it took determination to figure out how to book our tickets but man oh man, it was worth it! Seeing “The Last Supper” was emotionally overwhelming. This was an incredible experience neither my husband or I will ever forget. The church, too, is stunning. Simple. Stunningly beautiful.
    Written June 9, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • wjsusan
    Detroit, MI18 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Very nice! Would recommend as it was very informative and well structured with time to appreciate the work. Liv tours was great, on time and our guide, he was very easy to understand. There is a longer version of the tour, but we were limited on time.
    Written April 24, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alessandro F
    Milan, Italy31,939 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Ancient abbey with annexed Cistercian monastery still in use, in the seats of the choir next to the main altar, I could see an old monk sleeping or in prayer with his eyes closed .... he looked like a statue.
    Beautiful church which represents one of the first examples of Gothic architecture in Italy. It was consecrated way back in 1221.
    Immediately noteworthy as soon as you arrive in the vicinity of the Abbey is the beautiful tower, called Ciribiciaccola.
    The nolar tower rises starting from the tiburium, to a height of 9 meters, with two octagonal sections, the first 4.14 meters and the second 12.19, to then become conical for 11.97 metres. From here to the end of the cross, placed on a globe, the height of 56.26 meters is reached.
    Each of the zones is in turn divided into two parts which are characterized by the abundance of hanging arches of various shapes, with worked frames and accompanied by white conical pinnacles which delimit the zones. The mullioned, three and four-mullioned windows are made of Candoglia marble (the same as that of the Milan Cathedral), while the single-lancet windows are in terracotta.
    The exact date of construction is not known, but it has been dated 1329-1340 and attributed to Francesco Pecorari of Cremona due to the similarity of this work with the other better known ones: the Torrazzo of Cremona and the bell tower of San Gottardo in Milan.
    Even the tower was remodeled over the years like the rest of the abbey, and only in 1905 were the eighteenth-century additions removed.
    The nolar tower houses the oldest bell mounted in the Ambrosian system, cast by master Glaudio da San Martino in 1453 [15] and still today operated manually by the Cistercian monks, via a rope that hangs in the middle of the intersection between the transept and the nave center of the church. The bell rings to summon the chapter of monks for the liturgy of the hours and during the sanctus of the conventual masses. In honor of San Bernardo di Chiaravalle, the bell is called Bernarda
    A plaque in the cloister mentions: «In the year of grace 1135 on 22.1, this monastery was built by the blessed Bernardo, abbot of Chiaravalle: in 1221 this Church was consecrated by Signor Enrico Archbishop of Milan, on 2 May, in honor of S. Maria di Clairvaux."
    Over the centuries the church grew, especially the monastery, which saw the birth of two cloisters and several cells for the monks.
    In the fifteenth century thanks to the powerful Sforza Visconti family, with artists such as Bramante and Amadeo they built the Chapter and the Great Cloister.
    During the Renaissance many painters wanted to leave their traces on these walls, frescoing various works of art. In that period Bernardino Luini also tried his hand,
    In the early seventeenth century the Fiammenghini executed other important frescoes.
    In 1861, to make room for the railway, the cloister of Bramante was destroyed......
    Access to the complex is through a sixteenth-century tower, built at the behest of Louis XII of France, next to which stands the oratory dedicated to San Bernardo where you can admire the fresco of Christ before Pilate, once attributed to Flemish Hieronymus Bosch and today assigned to the Swiss Hans Witz, who was court painter in the years of Galeazzo Maria Sforza.
    The square in front of the church gradually widens as one approaches it, while it is narrow immediately after the entrance. Note, on the left, a small church dedicated to San Bernardo, dating back to 1412 and later adapted to an apothecary following the construction in 1762 of another church, also dedicated to the saint, on the opposite side attached to the old guesthouse.
    The facade of the church is the one prior to the seventeenth-century renovation, in fact restored in 1926 to bring to light the original project. In the current structure and in particular in the two side entrances, the signs of the renovation and some architectural elements that are not well integrated with the rest of the structure can still be seen. The seventeenth-century entrance narthex is still preserved. It replaces the thirteenth-century original, of which the side walls are preserved.
    It has the traditional hut shape, with the frame supported by small terracotta arches; the white stone of the seventeenth-century facade still remains, clearly out of tune with the rest of the project. The three arches are aligned with the entrances.
    After passing the thirteenth-century door, you immediately notice the Latin cross plan, arranged on three naves with a cross vault, supported by small terracotta pillars on the sides, and with a flat apse. The main body is made up of four bays, while a smaller fifth forms the presbytery. The arms of the transept are formed by two rectangular bays, while the crossing is deformed by the dome of the tower. Once you reach the fourth span, you can see the rectangular pillars connected to a wall that supports the choir.
    The choir is a wonderful example of wooden art
    He enters it
    Written December 4, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alessandro F
    Milan, Italy31,939 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Arriving in Milano from Ticino and Naviglio Grande , during centuries, the bell tower of this church was the “lighthouse without light “ for pilgrims, travelers and boatmen.
    The church is made up by two little churches connected
    The ancient one is the left one built in 1176 , the second one was built in the 15th century by Duke Gian Galeazzo Visconti and it’s called the Duke Chapel
    Beautiful the facades and the two internal naves, both decorated by amazing frescoes
    Written October 17, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • WilliamWillieWilson
    Nashville, TN1,609 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    This is what we love while traveling, finding a gem that has no tourists. Simpliciano is just far enough off the beaten path that you’ll see very few tourists if any. The mysterious dimly lit interior and richly dark flooring are unmistakable. A few panes of stained glass illuminate the church. Most incredibly, the structure has stood since AD 400.
    Written July 24, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • 545medva
    Budapest, Hungary3,904 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    One of the oldest churches in the city. It was built in the 11th century. You must be lucky to get in, three times we were there was closed. It is in the very busy part of Milan.
    Written November 10, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ANGELO V
    Milan, Italy4,262 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The church of San Giovanni in Conca originated during the paleochristian times (5th-6th centuries), and was remodeled in Romanesque style in the 12th century. During the 13th century it became the private chapel of the Visconti family then reigning in Milano.
    During the 19th century the church was transformed into a shelter for cars and carts, then it became a workshop and finally a warehouse, until it was demolished after WW II. Only part of the apse and the crypt were left.

    The crypt reopened recently to the public, and it is open an average of 3-4 days per month (as of April 2023), so check before visiting when it is open.

    Most of the artworks that were in the church and crypt are now in the Ancient Art collection of the Sforza Castle. Only a few marble fragments are in the crypt, that is worth visiting as one of the only two Romanesque crypts still existing in Milano.
    Written April 6, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alessandro F
    Milan, Italy31,939 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The monument, dedicated by the Combatant Associations to the memory of the Milanese fallen during the Great War, was built to a design by the architect Giovanni Muzio with the collaboration of Alberto Alpago Novello, Tomaso Buzzi, Ottavio Cabiati and Gio Ponti between 1927 and 1930 and was inaugurated on 4 November 1928 with a great ceremony in which the Duke of Aosta, commander of the 3rd Army of the Royal Army during the First World War, read the text of the Victory Bulletin of the 1918.
    The plaster sculptural group by Libero Andreotti entitled Return after Victory, which was later not cast in bronze, was located in the churchyard of the Temple.
    Written April 23, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Thomas Ozbun
    Vicenza, Italy982 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    The church of Santa Maria, is in my opinion, one of the best looking in Milan; built in the 15th century in the Renaissance style it has a porticoed entrance like that of Sant'Ambrogio. Inside the transition between Renaissance and Baroque decorations is splendid, with beautiful gilded carvings and decorations, also beautiful is the big central dome. Right next to it is the small medieval church of San Celso.
    Written December 7, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Gabriel H
    Bellaire, TX7,022 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    San Carlo al Corso is a Neo-Classical structure built on the site of a previous church, Santa maria dei Servi, which dated back tio the 13th century. The current church was completed in 1847 and consecrated as part of the Milan archdiocese. In 1938 it was elevated to the level of Basilica by Pius XI. The facade impresses by its classical colonnade whuich faces la Piazza del Corso. On top, there is a large dome, which also gives the shape to the church below. The altar is of impressive proportions and surrounded by beautiful marble sculptures. The ceiling of the apse offers lovely frescoes while that of the dome is amply decorated with stucco work and stone carvings. Other large marble sculptures decorate the walls and there is a gorgeous pulpit to the right side of the church
    Written April 15, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Rhyannon B
    5 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    I spotted this unusual church when walking back from the Duomo along Via Torino. The outside is rather plain, but it's unusual shape drew me in. It was worth experiencing the peaceful atmosphere, the beautiful side altars, and most of all the jewel-like dome. I also enjoyed seeing a replica of the Pieta after seeing the original in St. Peter' three weeks before. A lovely memory at the end of my month in Italy,
    Written July 8, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Aleksandar
    Belgrade, Serbia8,216 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Interesting early-Christian crypt below nowdays Duomo. Entrance is from the Cathedral and it's quite an interesting place.
    Written December 15, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ANGELO V
    Milan, Italy4,262 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The "Chiesa di San Sepolcro" (church of the Saint Sepulchre) is a church that was originally built in 1030 AD in the area where the Roman Forum was located.
    During various periods the church was extensively remodeled, until it got the current aspect at the end of the 19th century.
    There is a crypt beneath the church, that is not always open: this review refers to the church only.

    The church interior is in Baroque style, and in the two chapels to the side of the altar there are two valuable terracotta sculptural groups: a "Last Supper" and a triptych on the death of Christ.
    Written January 25, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alessandro F
    Milan, Italy31,939 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Very nice Temple behind the Guastalla garden. After the increase of Jewish citizens at the end of 19th century was built this Temple with a very nice facade well decorated, the internal was remade two times in 1947 after the bombs of Second World War and in 1997 for an important restructuring that allowed this place to become the most important Jewish Temple il Milan
    Written April 11, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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