History Museums in Rome

Top History Museums in Rome, Italy

History Museums in Rome

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Things to do ranked using Tripadvisor data including reviews, ratings, photos, and popularity.
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What travelers are saying

  • fabinico
    Paris, France318 contributions
    I'm not usually very interested in sculpture, it's the part I generally skip in large museums. But the Musei Capitolini are quite delightful, it's masterpiece after masterpiece, mostly antique sculpture, and the setting is worth the visit for itself. Some rooms you can pass quickly, I also found the painting section wasn't nearly at the level of the sculpture one, but we very much enjoyed our visit with our 3 children. Don't miss the Palazzo Nuovo (which you access through an underground tunnel).
    Written May 16, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • larryjman
    Montreal, Canada215 contributions
    A beautiful palace, and an even better art museum. I went to the Borghese Gallery the day before, and as much as I loved that spot, the crowds were quite busy and the rules were strict. The Doria Pamphilj, however, was much more relaxed. It wasn't nearly as crowded (perhaps because I went in the morning), I didn't need to deposit my bag anywhere, and the staff seemed less overwhelmed and therefore a bit friendlier.

    An audioguide would probably be a good investment! There aren't any signs next to the pieces giving any context or history. Just simply the name of the artist.

    There's also an impressive collection here. Obviously, Velazquez's "Portrait of Innocent the X" is probably their most famous work. They have some early Caravaggio (my personal favourite), Raphael, Carracci, Titian, Brill, Lippi.

    Although the collection is probably not as extensive or well-known as Borghese, I think the gallery provides a competitive alternative. I would also argue the palace itself is much more charming, and overall more beautiful and better taken care of than its rival.
    Written May 4, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Robert L
    Amherst, MA1,497 contributions
    Fabulous museum. Not overloaded with objects but world class items. Sculptures and statues that I will never forget.
    The pugilist.
    The discus thrower.
    Etc.
    Written March 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Kathy E
    Vienna, Austria240 contributions
    You’re taken back in time via superb projections and reconstructions based on latest archeological finds, worth going through twice if you can. The book selection for kids is good, too.
    Written November 21, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • ChiccoTorino
    Turin, Italy150 contributions
    Top!
    Collection is unique and able to shed a light on the Etruscan culture but also on its commerces with Greece, thus being also very interesting the relationship between Etruscans and Greeks.
    Location is very interesting, in a former Pope residence and at the border of the nicest park in Rome.
    Personnel is of rare kindness and likes to help the visitor, the information/reception desk is particularly helpful and available. Same for the ticket office.
    You have the impression to be welcome and that they like their job. Pretty impressive and unique!
    Written August 28, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Madeline
    Oxford, UK29 contributions
    Make sure you buy the tickets at the Museum! We bought online and they were significantly more expensive, and didn't offer a student discount (at the Museum it can be argued for). The area it self is gorgeous, even if the museum is a lot of reading (which I don't mind).
    Written April 17, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • DanielCary
    Edinburgh, UK40 contributions
    This a short thought informative history of the city and well worth visiting before you head off to the sights as it gives you some insights into what you are seeing on the ground
    Written December 22, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • MarcusHurley
    Bristol, UK8,282 contributions
    One of the places I'd always wanted to see was a proper ossuary and the Capuchin Crypt was nearby so we paid it a visit. After checking vaccinations and temperature we were allowed in, firstly to the museum. This had some interesting details about the order extending to their current activities today. The main attraction was the crypt but it was incredibly frustrating not to be allowed to take photos and I don't understand why. Some churches charge extra for a photography pass which is fine as it gets them more cash but this was just a ban. The bones were laid out on fantastic patterns and designs and some of the bodies appeared to still have mummified skin on them. But you won't know unless you look up pictures online as I have none to share!
    Written February 5, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • ScotchMissed
    Outer Hebrides, UK1,465 contributions
    We spent over three hours wandering in the museum, which is large. There are so many different aspects, including the Baths of Diocletian, the cloisters and all the exhibition areas. It was very quiet when we were there.

    Make sure you visit the Basilica next door, as it incorporates parts of the Baths into its structure.

    Every time we turned a corner there was something else to look at. Lots of interesting items on display and some really good A/V that helps to give context. The chariot found in a a grave, being one example. The information on pre-Roman sites was fascinating.

    Love that there is outside space as well as the indoor exhibitions. It was a beautiful March day when we were there and lovely to sit in the sunshine.
    Written March 10, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • chuckofcorby
    Corby, UK699 contributions
    Wanting to pass an hour I dropped into the Palazzo Venezia, loads to see, the floors are amazing! The rooms used through the decades by Popes and even Mussolini. Many a treasure. A couple of nice gardens too.
    Written February 18, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • dapper777
    Monaco32,114 contributions
    Together with the excavations of the church of San Clemente, the Roman houses of Caelian Hill represent one of the most fascinating places in underground Rome for the presence of original decorations and for the events that over the centuries have originated profound changes to the structure.The extraordinary state of conservation of the frescoed rooms and the very high artistic value and religious interest make the Roman Houses of Caelium a fundamental step in the knowledge of ancient Rome.
    The access to the houses is from Clivo di Scauro (Clivus Scauri), an ancient Roman street and once main axis of the hill, which has preserved part of its original layout.
    The Domus were discovered in 1887 by Father Germano di San Stanislao,rector of the Basilica dei Santi Giovanni e Paolo at the time.
    The layers of the history of Rome are overlap in the "Case Romane del Celio”, 20 spaces between the 2nd-the end of 4th c., which are under the Basilica of Saints John and Paul. You can find the upper class Rome that lived in a "domus" and the lower class that lived in "insulae".
    These are twenty splendidly frescoed rooms, dated between the 1st and 4th centuries, originally shops and warehouses of an 'insula', a working class multi-storey building.
    From popular block (insula) to rich domus, up to the construction of the Christian titulus: these are the events of the monument that was born from the merger of a series of buildings that were joined together during the third century AD by a single owner and transformed into a elegant domus with representative rooms, decorated with valuable frescoes.
    a charming and evocative walk through the history of Romans living in the city through the ages.
    It is a beautiful underground archaeological site, unfortunately little known, but extremely interesting as it allows us to better understand the extraordinary stratification of an ancient city like Rome.
    Recommended,
    Written December 30, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • susanan113
    Medford, OR66 contributions
    I was on a trip to Italy with my God-daughter and as we were walking back to out hotel from Museo Nazionale di Castel Sant'Angelo we paused in the piazza del Popolo. As we began our walk again we noticed the da Vinci museum and mutually decided to go and check it out. I had read a little bit about it prior to our trip, and so I knew that it was tiny and contained no original paintings. Leonardo da Vinci, however, was so much more that just a painter and this museum is proof of that. With limited space and display, this museum manages to be, and show to the public, how incredibly cerebral this man was. There are many hands on displays to touch or play with, allowing the patrons to fully grasp the concepts of da Vinci's brilliance. I have read other reviews of this museum on this site and am shocked by the expectation and ignorance of the people who wrote those reviews.
    My God-daughter and I had the Roma pass and therefore the entrance fee was slightly discounted. I think the non discount price is only 12.00 euros. That's a deal!
    Written August 22, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • benessere2015
    London, UK88 contributions
    Important and interesting museum. It helps to have good knowledge of Italian but this isn't strictly crucial as there are audioguides available with other languages, but hearing them in the rooms they describe is tricky due to competing audio from the TV screens in some places.

    Bring your green pass. Entrance is free, it'd be a tough hearted traveller who didn't drop at least a few euros in the donations box, but there is no obligation to do so. The second World War is a well covered piece of history, but what I like about the museum is that they start from Rome in the inter War period, the birth of fascism, what Mussolini originally did for the city in terms of infrastructure investment (with positive and negative consequences). Then as you move along, you see how life was under the German occupation, then see stories of the resistance heros who suffered torture (many of whom sojourned in this very building to be interrogated by the Gestapo) and usually were shot or taken to concentration camps. It does not get gory or overly sentimental - it gives you the facts and lets the horror of them speak for themselves.

    The cells with the grafitti are extremely moving. You should plan for a bit of a sit down afterwards, and a bit of thinking and recovery time, rather than dashing off to your next attraction.

    I do recommend this place though - for me it was in an area of town where I needed to be (husband in hospital up the road) but also conveniently open on Mondays, which is relatively unusual in Rome. I am not sure I'd have even thought to go here on a shorter visit to Rome, or one less constrained by circumstances, but I am very glad I did stumble across it and go.
    Written August 30, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Aaron A
    London, UK48 contributions
    From the outside this can seem like quite a humble museum, but inside there is a deep history. It's interesting to follow this once central area through the ages and to understand how Rome's history has been built on top of itself.

    The main highlights:
    - Coins from era's from BC up until the past few centuries
    - Bodies and sarcophagi of an adult and children found within the area
    - Glassware and exotic animal bones used by ancient Romans and found in the drains and sewers

    Spend around 1-2 hours here. Particularly good for a rainy day. It was particularly quiet when we we visited in September.
    Written October 1, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • David O
    Purcellville, VA99 contributions
    Nice spot outside the busy pace of downtown. You can get a pass for all 3 museums. This review is for the Civilta section. They have a great collection but can present it so much better. Wish they had English descriptions of the exhibits and the lighting in some spots could have been better. However, overall a great museum. Worth it if you’re I that part of the city.
    Written March 24, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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