Scenic/ Historic Walking Areas in Rome

Top Scenic Walking Areas in Rome, Italy

Scenic Walking Areas in Rome

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16 places sorted by traveler favorites

What travelers are saying

  • Augustine O
    1 contribution
    Lovely places, the Spanish step all the way down(careful) and the children like the place too. Few designers stores around the Conner if you feel like doing small shopping.
    Written September 10, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • AURELIO L
    ANDRIA ITALY1,108 contributions
    this is a beatifull road ,you can try to do your shopping here,it is not too expensive even if in last years so many shops are closing here
    Written August 30, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Manuela L
    Luxembourg City, Luxembourg7,086 contributions
    Nice area for walks and to visit Janiculum Hill, a fifteen-minute walk up Via Garibaldi from the place di Sant' Egidio to the summit of the Janiculum Hill with the most beautiful view of the center of Rome; the place is dedicated to Garibaldi's defence of the Roman Republic of 1849; to admire the equestrian monument of Garibaldi.
    Written March 14, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Luca Lo Iacono
    Rome, Italy154 contributions
    I ordered a Bruschetta with sausages and a Tonnarelli cacio and pepe.

    Total was €18

    Location is simple but practical since it's really close to Castel Sant'Angelo and buses.
    Food was fine, way better than what is normally is fed to tourists but a bit overcharged + 2€ of table service which is not really nice.

    Written December 27, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dapper777
    Monaco32,215 contributions
    The name of Via Merulana derives from the so-called "prata" or "campus Meruli", a land possession of the Merula family (or Meruli or Merli) which occupied the whole area between the Lateran and S.Maria Maggiore church during the medieval period.
    The primitive route of the road was very different from the current one, in that it started near the intersection between today's Labicana and Merulana streets, cut the latter to go almost vertically towards the area now occupied by Piazza Vittorio Emanuele II, touching Piazza Dante to the west and joining with the street that came out of the "Esquiline gate", that is the ancient "via Labicana".
    The current via Merulana instead was opened by Gregorio XIII and completed by Sixtus V to connect the two basilicas of S. Maria Maggiore and S. Giovanni in Laterano.
    Halfway there is the Palazzo Merulana, opened in 2018.
    Founded in 2014, Elena and Claudio Cerasi Foundation holds a fine modern and contemporary art collection, mainly built on the works of artists from Rome and Italy in the first half of the 20th Century.
    In Paris via Merulana would be a "boulevard" for those rows of imposing trees, for its rigor due to the rectilinear connection between two districts: Esquilino and Monti.
    With two basilicas that look from opposite sides, two cathedrals of spirituality: San Giovanni in Laterano and Santa Maria Maggiore.
    Via Merulana in the upper part (towards San Giovanni) is quieter, monks stroll, nuns who converse quietly, almost whispering. Groups of students with sweaters decorated with religious coats of arms walk together following the group leader, sing, reach the churches, but also the many Catholic boarding schools or colleges, whose windows overlook the sidewalks.
    Then you go down to the intersection with via Labicana and it looks like another street. Traffic and noise increase, nuns and monks disappear, restaurants, bars, bookshops appear. The boys head to a well-known pastry, wine bar in front of Teatro Brancaccio for the usual aperitif.
    The beautiful Palazzo Merulana welcomes, still fresh from restoration, those who want to visit the collection, attend book presentations and exhibitions.
    Traffic has worsened a lot, but Via Merulana is more alive than ever, it is a street that has not gone out of fashion, it is still a very popular and loved street.
    There are many historic shops that work because they are passed on to the heirs, children and grandchildren.
    Libraries resist, such as the ancient Rotondi specializing in esotericism, food shops, the fabric shop, the numismatic shop, four historic restaurants, an oven, a bar, the knife grinder.
    There is a bit of everything and there is something for everyone.
    Take a walk, you will see that you will discover some of its sober and popular charm.
    Written March 1, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ChiefGuru
    Decatur, IN3,414 contributions
    I found this square interesting, though not as impressive as many other Roman plazas. The Pontifical Gregorian University is the large dominating structure present along side this plaza. This is a historic Jesuit University, founded in 1551 by Ignazio di Loyola on behalf of Gregory XIII. Opposite the University stands the seventeenth-century Palazzo Muti Papazzurri. Anunique historical reference is the derivation of the name of this square. The name derives from the game of the "pilotta" (meaning "ball") which was played here since the sixteenth century. The name was imported by Romans, probably from Spain. The game consisted of hitting a ball with a hand closed in a fist or with a kind of wooden spoon against a wall. Following its introduction to Italy, the game spread among the kids who improvised games on any available wall. However, the game also became popular among the nobility who, unlike the common populace, played on specially built regulation courts. An example of these regulation courts was built in this square and then called "dell'Olmo". A good example of what this "ball" sport evolved to be today is Jai-Alai.
    Written August 29, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Lindsey P
    23 contributions
    Enjoyed a lovely walk along Tiber today. Calm and away from the pollution of the Monday traffic. Images are amazing.
    Written May 8, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • The Spanish Steps Apartment
    Rome, Italy24,375 contributions
    This is a small fountain built in 1929, on the back of which is a verse from “Jerusalem Delivered” by the 16th Century Italian poet Torquato Tasso, who died nearby. On the hill side is set a modern sarcophagus; below is a somewhat odd fountain with a stylized shield, underneath of which is a sword running into a small basin. There are swirling scrolls on either side of the sword. The fountain and surrounding area could use a bit of maintenance.
    Written March 25, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • VoyagerAimerSourire
    Princeton, NJ647 contributions
    We had just left the Trastevere by walking through the Porta Settimiana when the first street on the left caught our attention. It was called Via Corsini and was lined on one side with beautiful residential façades whose colors were accentuated by the setting sun. The street was a welcome quiet change from the crowds in the Trastevere. The Via Corsini actually leads to the Orto Botanico, the botanical garden of the University of Rome, so is open on to the treeline of the gardnes on the opposite side. Good place to just catch your breath before rushing headlong again into hot summery Rome.
    Written July 22, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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