Religious Sites in Rome

Religious Sites in Rome, Italy

Religious Sites in Rome

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What travelers are saying

  • Elizabeth M
    Halifax, Canada80 contributions
    One of the most beautiful churches in Rome. Highly recommend stopping in for a visit - gold ceiling is especially beautiful.
    Written November 21, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Judi A
    Mevaseret Zion, Israel40 contributions
    This church with rich paintings has an interesting story related to one of its domes. Read about it and go see this beautiful and intriguing artwork. Don’t be stingy and put coins to turn on the lights.
    Written November 13, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dapper777
    Monaco32,259 contributions
    With its imposing structure, the Basilica of St. Paul Outside the Walls is one of the four basilicas of Rome, the largest after that one of St. Peter: it stands on the site where, according to legend, the apostle Paul was buried.
    On that spot the first Christians erected a sepulchral chapel, later transformed into a basilica by Constantine and consecrated by Pope Sylvester I in 324.
    To enter the basilica you have two options: to the north through the Gregorian Portico, facing the Ildefonso Schuster Park or to the west from the "Quadriportico".
    In it, surrounded by the large colonnade, the imposing statue of St. Paul, made of Carrara marble by Giuseppe Obici, will welcome you. Built on the burial place of Paul (originally Saul) of Tarsus, the basilica was destroyed by the fire of 1823 and rebuilt starting in 1826 thanks to the contributions of the faithful from all over the world.
    The portico, which was built between 1890 and 1928 by Guglielmo Calderini on a project by Luigi Poletti, has a row of columns at the entrance, double on both sides and triple on the opposite side. The side walls are decorated with medallions depicting the twelve apostles and some disciples of St. Paul, while in the upper band the splendid nineteenth-century mosaics stand out, again by Luigi Poletti, author,among other things, of the bell tower and the portico on the northern side.
    We visited this church about 25 years ago and we had a great desire to see it again after so many years through the eyes of older and more mature people.
    There are no words to describe it. Maybe one : wonderful.
    it is certainly one of the most beautiful buildings to see in Rome.
    Amazing construction.
    Elegant, imposing,shining and beautiful place to visit and to stay inside for some time.
    Nice garden outside and gorgeous paintings inside.

    We visited this church about 25 years ago and we had a great desire to see it again after so many years .
    Splendid, it is certainly one of the most beautiful things to see in Rome.
    Amazing construction. Elegant, imposing, shinning and beautiful place to visit and stay inside some time.
    A church off the regular beaten path for tourists, but, definitely, well worth a visit.
    It is impressive and massive, yet quiet.
    A feast for the eyes.
    Highly recommended.
    Written July 10, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • The Spanish Steps Apartment
    Rome, Italy25,484 contributions
    One of my favorite churches in Rome, it is small but packed with amazing artwork everywhere you look. Make sure to bring coins to illuminate the chapel with the two fabulous works by Caravaggio (it is 2 euros), other chapels have a button you can push to light them up.
    Written November 15, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • beautifulsouth
    Tennessee109 contributions
    Such a beautiful interior, especially the ceilings. Was under significant renovations when we visited but the beauty is still apparent
    Written November 10, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SteveS1970
    Coventry, UK7,203 contributions
    Another basilica on another corner but this one is dedicated to the patron Saint of Scotland St Andrew which images of him being crucified on a sultire (X shaped cross), which is represented on the Scottish flag. Fascinating basilica with amazing domes and painted ceiling.
    Written October 23, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dapper777
    Monaco32,259 contributions
    The Scala Santa, one of the most important sacred places ever for Christian devotion, is located a few steps from St. John Lateran's Basilica.
    After the long restoration works started and carried out by the Vatican Museums, the steps of the Holy Stairs have been freed from dirt, corrosion and encrustations.
    They are twenty-eight and are made of Tyrian gray-veined white marbles, consumed little by little by the faithful who for centuries have climbed them on their knees.
    It is called "Santa" because according to tradition Jesus Christ went up there to reach Pontius Pilate's palace in Jerusalem on Good Friday before the crucifixion.
    Brought to Rome by empress St. Helen in the 4th century, they are considered so sacred that the faithful climb them on their knees in prayer. Pilgrims walk through it praying on their knees as this place speaks to us of the Passion of Our Lord.
    On the Fridays of Lent this act of devotion ensures the indulgence of sins.
    On the sides of the base of the Holy Stairs there are two imposing statues linked to the Passion: that one of Jesus with Pontius Pilate and another one depicting the kiss of Judas. Through the glass covers you can still see some stains of blood left by Jesus on this staircase, as tradition says.
    In the Middle Ages the Scala Sancta was part of the Lateran Palace, near the Chapel of St. Sylvester. When in the year 1589 pope Sixtus V destroyed the old papal palace to build a new one, he ordered that the Scala Santa be moved to the place where it is today, in front of the entrance to a chapel known as Sancta Sanctorum (Holy of Holies).
    The latter is an ancient papal chapel, dedicated to St. Lawrence, and is the only remaining part of the old Lateran Palace.
    The name is due to the many and precious relics that are preserved there.
    The Sancta Sanctorum contains the image of Christ "akeropita", which means "not painted by human hand", which is sometimes carried in procession.
    Currently the Scala Santa is surrounded by four staircases, two on each side for common use, since the marble steps can only be climbed on the knees.
    It is a very popular practice among faithful Romans and pilgrims, especially on Fridays and during Lent.
    In 1723 Pope Innocent XIII decided to protect those steps with a wooden roof and for three hundred years they remained hidden. In addition to the Scala Santa, the sixteenth-century frescoes commissioned by Sixtus V have regained their light, covering 2500 square meters and adorning this very particular Sanctuary.
    Round the right hand corner of the façade of the Holy Staircases is what appears to be the apse mosaic of a 9th century papal dining hall, Triclinium Leoninum, now displayed in an 18th century brick aedicule.
    It depicts Christ with the Apostles in the centre, Christ with Constantine and Pope Sylvester on the left, and St Peter, Pope Leo III and Charles the Great (Charlemagne) on the right. Pope Leo III has a square nimbus, showing that he was still alive when it was made.
    The original mosaic has been dated to just before year 800, when Charlemagne was crowned as emperor in Rome, but the present work is an 18th century copy.
    If you are in the area, and you have already visited the Lateran Basilica, the Scala Santa is the ideal complement to the spectacular Lateran complex of the Catholic religion in Rome.
    Written March 8, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Francesca
    1 contribution
    I visited it in June, entry was free and I honestly believe it's the most beautiful abbey I have ever seen. I really liked visiting it. I also had the chance to see a work of Raphael, one of my favorite artists.
    Written July 12, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • SteveS1970
    Coventry, UK7,203 contributions
    Behind the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier is a very steep set of stairs leading up to this beautiful basilica. Amazing views and nestled next to Piazza del Campidoglio it’s as if it is hidden away.
    Stunning architecture and amazing artwork, as with all basilicas in Rome, done miss this fantastic looking building.
    Written October 25, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Susan M
    Minneapolis, MN122 contributions
    What a gem of a church. Of course, there is the legend of Santa Cecelia and the beautiful statue carved of her. But, what did it for me was the unbelievably spectacular mosaics (one of the lovely nuns turned on the lights so we could see them). Don't miss this cool, lovely 5th century church.
    Written June 2, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Renee M
    Monterey, California, Usa180 contributions
    Worth a visit to see relics of the true cross, a
    nail that pierced Christ’s flesh, and the inscription over his head. Plus a certified copy of the shroud of Turin. All these are housed in a solemn and reverent way, with signs describing the relics and the reasons for their assumed veracity.
    Written May 31, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Foodie_CST🍽🇷🇴
    Kolios, Greece5,191 contributions
    Pretty close to Piazza Navona, this is definitely an interesting Basilica that's worth a stop to see it and to also admire art works from Caravaggio and Raphael. I would say, it's not to be missed if you are in the area.
    Written June 12, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Noraatc
    Sudbury, MA31,824 contributions
    I tried to see the interior of the Chiesa San Carlo al Quattro Fontane at least three times during my twelve days in Rome. Finally, the allusive church was opened before noon and I had a chance to admire simplicity and perfect geometric perspective of the Borromini’s white oval interior. No elaborate decorations, no gilded statues... just the flawless harmony and immaculate precision of Borromini’s design. How elegant it is...

    The facade neighboring the famous Quattro Fontane is absolutely stunning, but it needs to be cleaned...
    Written November 23, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • dapper777
    Monaco32,259 contributions
    This minor Roman basilica is located on the Caelian Hill in Rome, half way from the Colosseum and the San Giovanni Basilica.
    Originally built in C. IV, the church owes its name (“Four Crowned Martyrs") to the tradition of the martyrdom of four converted Roman soldiers, who refused to worship a statue of Aesculapius and for this reason they were martyred under Diocletian.
    With its high defensive walls, this bulky, thick-walled structure emerges on the way to the Lateran and looks more like a fortress than a church.
    This basilica is, indeed, a very rare example in Rome of “church-fortress”: inside the historical complex, in fact, there is a bell tower of the 9th century, (the oldest of medieval Rome), the cloistered monastery, a medieval cloister, three churches and two classrooms frescoed in Gothic style.
    It is is a architectonical complex not very well known to the majority of tourists and very rarely you will see people inside the church.
    And maybe this is not a bad thing. The basilica does, after all, include a convent, and it’s nice to see it all undisturbed by hordes of visitors. The church is a gem, and a must-see for anyone interested in Rome’s off-the-beaten-path sites.
    This compound holds some of the most secret and impressive medieval treasures imiraculously preserved in Rome: the Saint Sylvester’s Chapel, the Gothic Hall, and a meditative, secret cloister.
    The third-century cloister, probably defined the most evocative one marble-carvers ever left in Rome, and the Oratorio di San Silvestro that, famous for the decorations with frescoes dated C.XIII, show, among the rest, episodes from the legend of Costantine.
    The ensemble of buildings still shows the severe character it had during the Middle Ages, when it was used as a defensive bastion for the nearby San Giovanni Basilica and Constantine's Patriarchy.
    The interior is the typical one of a medieval basilica, with three naves divided up by antique granite columns, with Corinthian composite capitals. The wide apse comes from the primitive church, whose middle nave was as large as the entire actual church. From the nave one moves into the gracious cloister that hosts a garden, built in 1120.
    This Romanesque eden with its portico, its painted arches, the chapel of Saint Barbara with its medieval frescoes, the greenery and the central fountain make this one of the most secluded and quiet spots in the city.
    The cosmatesque floor of the church is truly splendid.
    It is worth a visit: especially for the cloister, an oasis of silence and beauty just 500 meters from the Colosseum.
    You perceive a wonderful sense of meditation and peace that envelops these walls and makes it a real special corner of Rome.
    You would never think you were in the hustle and bustle of Rome.
    To visit the cloister, ring the little bell on the left after you’ve walked in.
    A €2 donation is requested, though not required, for the upkeep of the convent and the basilica.



    Written February 9, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • The Spanish Steps Apartment
    Rome, Italy25,484 contributions
    This is our local church, nd we love it. The church's gorgeous bell tower was designed by the amazing architect Borromini (best seen from up the street). The church is also home to two magnificent angels by Borromini's rival, the famous Bernini (the angels originally were intended to grace the bridge leading to Castel Sant'Angelo, but were immediately seen as so beautiful they were moved to an interior location to preserve them, and the ones on the bridge are replicas). The church also has a very peaceful interior courtyard, with a little fountain in the middle (with fish swimming beneath) and fruit trees. Note: as of November 2022, they are restoring the front and side doors of the church, so entrance is through the door on the front right which goes through the courtyard.
    Written November 21, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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