Cemeteries in London

Cemeteries in London, England

London Cemeteries

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What travelers are saying

  • Ravensville
    Ilkeston, UK224 contributions
    I thoroughly enjoyed the tour on Saturday, to the East Cemetery what is more we were the only two guests and ( due to training) four people taking us on a tour!
    Andrew Yeo our guide was a very knowledgeable ,pointing out lots of interesting facts about the history of the cemetery, also the unusual and interesting graves that were within Highgate.
    I really hope that I can return in due course and join the tour for the West Cemetery. Thank you for the tour I would highly recommend it .
    Written May 23, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • StephenCross
    Dublin, Ireland16,906 contributions
    Brompton Cemetery is an amazing old cemetery. It’s really interesting to see all the really old graves and gravestones.
    Written April 3, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Amy C
    London, UK348 contributions
    Interesting gothic graveyard in North London 🤔 I went to as a kid and as a adult cafes near here in Stoke newington
    Written May 21, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Eric B
    London, UK1,058 contributions
    We travelled from W London to see this place and were delighted. It's a hilly, wooded site, with distant St Pauls glimpses and loads of tombstones in varying states of repair. Lots of walkers, many with dogs, and it feels totally safe. It's fascinating reading some of the inscriptions. Near the South entrance is The Ivy House, London's first community owned pub and a good place for lunch.
    Written February 3, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Goannas
    Comet, Qld1,662 contributions
    Some big names buried here, as well as some lesser known and unknown ones. A nice, quiet space in the city. Would be good to do the guided walk on another visit.
    Written November 18, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Elaine M
    4 contributions
    I visited to attend a walk entitled "Relicts and Wives - a grave matter". Although it was 2 hours the time just flew by as a great deal of social history was revealed to us. Eliza Best of Bryant & May factory strike fame, Clara Grant, the inventor of the 'Farthing bundles' for poor children, Lucy Sherrard Atkinson who followed her husband across the steppes of Tartar and supported his travel writing only to discover at his death that she was the 2nd Mrs Atkinson and the 1st wife was still alive. No wonder he gave her no credit for her contribution in his writings! The fascinating stories go on and on - plus it is a beautiful oasis of calm and green. It is surprising how much birdsong we heard given that this is within a very busy part of the steaming metropolis.

    Visit soon - am sure you will be hooked like me!
    Written March 28, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Brian T
    London, UK5,502 contributions
    If you venture down Redcross Way, a quiet backstreet a short walk from the bustling Borough Market and London Bridge, you’ll come across a tall rusting iron fence surrounding what appears to be large vacant plot of land. The fence is completely festooned with ribbons, feathers, beads, knitted hearts, small plastic banners, and all manner of trinkets and personal items such as shoes. There’s flowers, some plastic, some fresh, many in varying states of decay. It’s an arresting site; some of the things have been added recently; others are faded and weathered from the elements. This curious and thought-provoking fence marks the eastern boundary of Crossbones Graveyard, a medieval burial ground that’s hidden in plain sight a few minutes walk from London Bridge

    This graveyard is an unconsecrated memorial to the thousands of prostitutes who lived, worked and died in this once lawless corner of London centuries ago. In medieval London, the local prostitutes were known as “Winchester Geese”. These prostitutes were not licensed by the authorities, but by the Bishop of Winchester who owned the surrounding lands, hence the namesake. The earliest known reference to the graveyard was by John Stow in his Survey of London in 1598: Over time, Crossbones Graveyard started to accommodate other members of society who were also denied a Christian burial, including paupers, criminals and children. With Southwark’s long and sordid past as “the pleasure-garden of London”, with legalised bear-baiting, bull fighting and theatres, the graveyard filled up extremely quickly. By the early 1850’s the graveyard was at bursting point, and due to health and safety concerns it was abandoned.

    Today it’s more than the vacant allotment it largely appears to be. When you visit Crossbones Graveyard today, you get a glimpse of that buried past, not just honoured by the layers of ribbons and other tokens to commemorate the dead fixed to the cemetery’s iron railings, but by the plethora of tributes throughout the remembrance garden. You’ll see a curious pyramid that is tucked away in one corner; in spring and summer its covered with flowers and greenery. You’ll see thought-provoking statuary, skulls, and other memorabilia; some of it is quite bizarre, almost macabre, but it is all meaningful to someone or other.

    In many respects it’s still a vacant allotment. It looks a bit unkempt, a bit unusual, almost as if it is filled with rubbish. But if it wasn’t for the curious collection of ribbons and flowers in varying states of decay decorating the railings, you might just walk right past what is one of London’s little gems, albeit a morbid on. By the cemetery gate and you’ll see a plaque that commemorates “The Outcast Dead”, a sentiment that’s also reflected in the remembrance ceremony that takes place each Halloween and at a monthly vigil held at the graveyard. 

    It’s only open on Wednesdays, Thursday and Fridays, between 12 noon and 2pm. It’s free to enter, and donations are accepted. It’s staffed by volunteers who are happy to answer any questions you might have. The entrance is on Union Street. It’s certainly an arresting and thought-provoking site, and worth a visit. Even if you cannot visit during the short opening period, at least walk along Redcross Way to see the memorial fence and to peer through the railings.
    Written February 23, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Philip M
    Manchester, UK3 contributions
    I got there walking via the Gran Union Canal, and Kensal Green Tube and Overground are a short walk away.
    The Cemetery is absolutely massive going back almost 200 years. I stayed for at least two hours looking around the old graves, statues and crypts, and only covered about a quarter of the place. There are benches to relax on and to take in the peacefulness of the place. Well worth a few visits.
    There are websites for more information and history.
    A lovely place to visit.
    Written May 24, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • geocachegang
    London, UK404 contributions
    Excellent cafe next to the entrance behind the flower stall run by amazing staff with lovely food. Highly recommended.
    Written March 3, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Ian C
    London, UK23,970 contributions
    The West Norwood Cemetery was opened in 1837 as the 2nd of the cemeteries to be established at that time, known as 'The Magnificent Seven'. West Norwood lives up to that name with the range and quality of funerary art and architecture, the history of the people buried there and the quiet tranquil atmosphere.
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    In those days, Norwood was countryside, part of the former Great North Wood (hence its name), and several of the mature trees were retained in the plans prepared by the architect William Tite who himself still resides here.

    The cemetery was the first in London designed in Gothic style, rather than classical. Sadly, the original chapels have all gone but there is an outstanding collection of funerary art, including the family vault of the Doulton family - of Royal Doulton fame -, and an area owned by the Greek Orthodox community which still retains the classical St Stephen's Chapel, along with many other fine tombs.

    Gothic monuments include those of the banker J. W. Golbart, the Grissell family (in cast iron) and Alexander Berens. In addition is a distinctly nautical monument to Captain John Wimble and his wife.

    Famous people here include Sir Henry Tate - founder of the Tate Gallery-, the architect William Burgess and Mrs Beeton the cookery writer. There are also several modern monuments.

    Across the road is St Luke's Church completed in 1821; the churchyard at the front was converted to a public garden, recently refurbished, as a war memorial after the Second World War.

    I noticed from the noticeboard that there is a conservation project in progress, which is very welcome. There is so much to see here that, if it was available, a guided tour may well be worthwhile.
    Written July 23, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • chezzagriff
    Liverpool, UK74 contributions
    This place is very easily walked past and unfortunately isnt open to the public, would have been given 5* if it was. Tours do operate but not very regularly. It was nice to see that people regarded their pets as they would humans and gave them a resting place and memorial headstone. R.I.P little guys.
    It can be seen through the gate on bayswater as you come out of the park past the lodge.
    Written April 10, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Nicholas H
    London, UK20,576 contributions
    This was the bone store within the Augustinian Priory and Hospital of St Mary, dating back to the 13th century but lost for hundreds of years until it was uncovered when Spitalfields was redeveloped in the 1990s. The site can be viewed at street level down through glass panels and there are stairs (and a lift) down to the actual level of this part of the original Priory. There’s not much to see, but as with all ancient ruins the trick is to use your imagination to conjure up the site as it once must have been. This is easy to miss as you hurry through Spitalfields, but worth making the effort to find it.
    Written November 23, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • 627pw2015
    Boston, MA260 contributions
    Loving the wild flowers left to grow this year, although the drunken affect of subsiding headstones is a little off-putting. Colour, songbirds, pollinators. A very special oasis.
    Written August 8, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • nelly_norman
    London, UK825 contributions
    This pet cemetery has been here for many years and became very run down - it started life when it was part of the Blue Cross quarantine kennels which was situated in what is now Hornfair Park, to house the dogs being brought back home by returning soldiers.

    In 2012 it received a makeover and although you can no longer bury your pet here you can arrange for a plaque to be installed.

    The entrance is just by the pedestrian footbridge over Shooters Hill and if you have 10 minutes to spare it is well worth investigating.

    There are several seats in shady spots and also a potted history of the site.
    Written June 2, 2019
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
  • Mark Benjamin L
    Dubai, United Arab Emirates551 contributions
    This is one of the very best graveyards / cemeteries in England . It includes the graves of the Egyptologist Howard Carter , the ex prime minister of the provisional government of Russia - Alexander Kerensky and that of the outstanding British rock/ folksinger Sandy Denny . It is wonderfully laid out and very well tended . A visit here is full of interest and enlightenment . I strongly recommend to all who are interested in history and funerary monuments .
    Written December 31, 2017
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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