London Ancient Ruins

Ancient Ruins in London, England

London Ancient Ruins

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What travelers are saying

  • Karen C
    Renton, WA19 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Go here first before you tour the Tower of London. The jewels are amazingly beautiful. A lot of other museums replace the gems with fake. This is actually the vault where the crowns and other jewels are kept. We did not wait at all to get in as we went at opening and straight to the jewels.
    Written July 9, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Laura
    London, UK21 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    It was a really interesting tour especially as I walk past a lot and did not know about the Roman remains. Rob was very informative and helpful and was happy for us to ask any questions and get photos
    Written May 26, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Deanosaur89
    Edmonton, Canada7,804 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    The ruins can be found at the Guildhall Art Gallery in the basement. It is free to enter this area and it is interesting to see some of what the Romans had built here. There isn't much left but they have some well written guides. This is a good activity for a rainy day or if you're looking for something off the beaten path. The Guildhall also houses some very nice classical and modern paintings and accepts donations. It is a short walk from St. Paul's Cathedral and is surrounded by underground and bus stations.
    Written July 4, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • AlexanderD
    Jackson, NJ5,614 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Would I go out of my way to see this? No. Would I spend more than a short time here? No. Did it blow my mind? No. Was it worth stopping and pausing to admire as a historical artifact? Absolutely.
    Written August 17, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • WorldwideRover007
    United States2,816 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    There isnt much too see other than a quick glance. There is a plaque explaining the ruins and history. No place to sit and admire. All in all, finished in under 5 minutes.
    Written April 25, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • keith h
    Chesham, UK1,171 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    St. Alphage was an Archbishop of Canterbury murdered by Danish invaders.
    The church was dedicated to him but now all that remains is a pleasant garden furnished with lots of benches & a ruined tower amongst the former site of Elsing Spital , a priory & hospital for the blind in medieval times & another victim of Henry VIII 's dissolution of the Monasteries.
    Another point of interest is the section of Roman Wall topped with medieval additions.
    Good place to sit on one of the numerous benches & watch City life.
    I noted a metal skywalk above but did not have time to investigate.
    Written December 22, 2023
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alice R
    Hobart, Australia8,929 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    An interesting small display of medieval bows and arrows that were used as a measure of defence. Well worth a look.
    Written March 18, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ianwyj
    Singapore5,191 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    While London has had a long history, it was the Romans who truly put the city on the world map but building a significant settlement in area. Needless to say, protection was needed for the young town and the natural thing to do was to build a wall around it. Stone soon replaced wood in the construction, and what's seen today at around the Tower Hill station is one of only several places left where the original Roman wall hasn't been dismantled, buried or incorporated into adjacent construction. This site had a useful information plaque next to it explaining the wall's origin - very useful as otherwise, it's easy to ignore without realising its history.
    Written October 12, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • ShaunH290
    London, UK2,727 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    The Charnel House is an example of what London has done so well in recent years - taking an old, often subterranean historical site and turned it into a modern tourist attraction. The London Mithraeum by the Bloomberg Building and the Amphitheatre under the Guildhall are other examples. All presented in a modern way, in this case going back to the Middle Ages, rather than Roman times, they are worth visiting if you are passing.
    Here the "glass surfboards" on the wall give lots of details, and a QR code behind the glass window leads to a lovely 3-D rendering of the site itself. The only downside is that there does not seem to be a website for the location, even though I have seen that some people have managed to get tours behind that glass.
    Written January 16, 2024
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • phat_dawg_21
    Alpharetta, GA15,201 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Lots of famous people have resided here, not always in comfort.

    Sir Walter Raleigh’s apartment was interesting.

    The area containing the torture equipment could be disturbing.
    Written September 30, 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • CPaM68
    Texas686 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    I am both fascinated and intrigued by ancient Egyptian obelisk, and my eventual goal is to see them all in person. On our last trip to London, I was able to visit the great British Museum and see the Nectanebo II obelisks. The Obelisks of Nectanebo II are a pair of black silk-stone Ancient Egyptian obelisks that are on display within the great court of the British Museum. These are actually only large fragments, approximately half of the original obelisks. Another large fragment from one of these can be found in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo. The obelisks originally stood on either side of the entrance to a temple located in the ancient city of Hermopolis (modern Al-Ashmunayn), Egypt. All four sides of both obelisks are inscribed with hieroglyphs recording their dedication to the Egyptian God Thoth. During Napoleon's 1798 expedition to Egypt, the obelisks were transported to Alexandria by the French forces with the intent of shipping them to France and being exhibiting at the Louvre. Instead, after the defeat of the French forces by the British, they were confiscated and transported to England and ended up in the British Museum. There are only 29 known ancient Egyptian obelisks in the world. Throughout time Egypt has only retained 8 of the obelisks with Italy, part of the old Roman Empire, having 11, England 4 (for some reason the pair of Nectanebo II obelisks are only officially counted as 1), and the others are scattered throughout Europe with 1 being in the US. Most are much larger than the Nectanebo II obelisks and are displayed outside in prominent piazzas or squares, rather than inside museums. Other than the Egyptian Museum in Cairo, the British Museum houses the world's largest and most comprehensive collection of Egyptian antiquities (with over 100,000 pieces). Many of the Egyptian artifacts found in the British Museum and other museums across the world were looted or acquired under dubious circumstances during the colonial period. Even though many of the artifacts may have been rightfully bought, Egypt is beginning to request that the artifacts be returned because of the belief that the artifacts belong to the country they came from.
    Written February 18, 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alice R
    Hobart, Australia8,929 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Apparently the easiest way to access the chapel is on a yeoman tour - maybe next time. We didn't actually get to enter here - can access during first and last hour of opening times only.
    Written March 18, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Alice R
    Hobart, Australia8,929 contributions
    3.0 of 5 bubbles
    This tower is part of the wall walk and part of the first fortification of the Tower of London, we didn't spend very long in here.
    Written March 18, 2020
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Peter R
    Dartford, UK1,283 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    These ruins are on private land and can only be viewed from a nearby footpath which leads out towards the river Darent and then to the Thames. The building is said to formally have been the manor of Howbury recorded as far back as the Domesday Book. The building and a Jacobean tithe barn are now in a very poor state of repair being almost totally covered in undergrowth and trees.
    Written June 30, 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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