Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Metaponto

Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Metaponto

Museo Archeologico Nazionale di Metaponto
4
Speciality Museums
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles891 reviews
Excellent
384
Very good
301
Average
136
Poor
36
Terrible
34

Soccca
Tolmin, Slovenia1,541 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2022 • Couples
We did not visit the museum, but only the archaeological park. In time of our visit there was no admission fee. We could just enter and admire the temples. They are really magnificent. It was late afternoon, so we could take some wonderful photos.
Written June 6, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lessa P
Kingston, Canada168 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2015 • Solo
I was visiting my stepfamily in Puglia and made a day trip to Matera. We decided to drive down to Metaponto to see these ruins since we were so close and I remembered learning about them during my days as a student of Classical History.

We took the SS380/SS175 from Matera which was a lovely country drive. The road was good and barely any traffic. However, there was absolutely no signage for the ruins on this road. We had to depend on directions from a local that we flagged down. Fortunately we had my Italian speaking stepmother with us or we would never have been able to find them. We did notice that there was some signage on the busier E90 highway.

There was a small parking lot at the ruins and what appears to have once been a small museum/information centre. It is either no longer maintained or was closed for the season.

The site was open and we were able to walk in along a gravel path. The grounds looked as though they were not being maintained, again, not sure if this is because we were there our of season or if the site has been abandoned.

It actually suited my taste to see the area untouched as it added to the scene of the ancient Greek ruins. We had the area to ourselves which was wonderful. As a previous reviewer noted, had we been elsewhere in Italy these ruins would be swarming with tourists.

As a student of the Classics and a lover of Greek and Roman history I greatly enjoyed being able to explore these ruins uninhibited. If you are in the area I definitely think this is worth a visit, just make sure that you have clear directions on how to get here!
Written April 23, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

rmitgoteam
Naples, FL1,116 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2013 • Couples
This is fantastic Greek temple ruin with 15 standing columns that dates from 560 BC. And not another person in sight -- anywhere! If this were in Rome or Athens or any number of other places, it would be swamped with busloads of tourists. For us, it was completely empty. Pythagoras was its most famous resident during the days of Magna Grecia. The name derives from the fact that the Knights Templar once gathered here before leaving for the Crusades. The site is always open and free.
Written June 9, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Paul S
London, UK117 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2018 • Solo
Fantastic history of this region of Italy, which formed part of Magna Grecia in the distant past.

The site is spread over a large area, with a small museum.

The most romantic is the Temple of Hera, with the remaining columns is inspiring of thoughts of Greek conquest, located on a junction of old Greek roads.
It's quite a remote site, despite being next to a main road, there is a visitor centre, but this was closed when I was there. A picnic site also there.
Entrance FREE.

The museum is fairly small, but very well organised with lots to see.
There is an entrance fee (2.50 I think) but well worth it to see some unique finds from the Greek past in the area.
Staff at the museum ok, but seemed disinterested even though I was the only visitor, and could not change a 20 euro note, luckily I managed to find enough in coins just!!

I was the only visitor at all sites, shame as such interesting history.

There are several other sites, with remains of theatre and buildings etc.

Well worth a visit if in the area, Matera is less than an hour drive away, so you can easily combine the 2 in a visit.

So nice to find roads in Italy that were not busy with mad driving!

You need a car as fairly remote and sites are long distances apart.
Written October 6, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

5*Hotelreviewer
London100 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2018
Not a huge amount to see and hard to find but if in the area its interesting to spend a whist visiting the various sites.
Written June 18, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Christopher T
Eustis, FL276 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2017 • Couples
We drove out of our way from Matera to visit this location because we nerd-out on ruins. Keep in mind, the ruins are on three different sites and the museum is in a fourth location. My advice is to visit the museum first because the street signs are very good for taking you there.

Inside the museum, the staff were very helpful showing us where to drive and see the ruins. The staff only spoke Italian, but they were very kind and patient helping us. There is a large map in the museum lobby (I've included the photo.) Without this photo, we were driving around in circles trying to find the Temple of Hera. The street signs were horrible for finding it, and GPS had absolutely no idea what we were looking for. But with the map, it turned out to be super easy. So, GET THE MAP!

There are three ruin sites: Temple of Hera, the necropolis of Crucinia (which is a small site), and the Archeological park. All were free and we were the only visitors.
It is true that this site lacks the grandeur of Athens, Sounio, Selinunte, Paestum. But, you will have it to yourself and it gives you the chance to explore this important ancient site without crowds. In particular, it's nice to just sit and enjoy the Temple. Brush up on your Pythagoras!
Written October 26, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

IanM31
Portland, Australia99 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2015
1. My visit in October 2015 to the Metaponto Museum revealed the advanced culture and artworks enjoyed by the ancient Greeks from the 8th Century BC . The entry fee is 2.50 Euro and to use the video camera I had to show my Passport and sign a form guaranteeing I would not use my video for commercial purposes.

The exhibits have been collected from the surrounding area and burial chambers; all have been expertly assessed. Here are exhibits of children's toys and amusements like knucklebones, many terra-cotta vases and urns beautifully crafted and decorated; some that were shattered have been carefully restored by glueing together.There are lions' heads and wolfs' heads carved in stone. Corroded swords and daggers are revealed in another case. Beautiful jewellery and coins are displayed. Small figurines, similar to those Tanagra figurines in the great MARTA museum in Taranto (Via Cavour), also show women elegantly dressed with flowing skirt folds in their costume and stylish hairstyles and little hats. Fascinating to see is the glassware, which must have been hand-made: glass jugs and very delicately blown small clear glass beakers and others that resemble a test-tube..

In the Museum, picture on display has been created to show the completed Temple of Hera (Tavole Palatine) as experts imagine. Another photo gallery has reproductions of sketches of Tavole Palatine in the year 1778, then its photos in the years 1903, 1925, 1927, 1934 and 1950. Other pictures show the Archaeological Park as it is normally and also when it was flooded due to heavy rains in late 2013. I refer to this Park in point 3 below.

The 2 other sites relating to Metaponto are some distance:
2. On this October 2015 visit, I used the railways bus (replacing train) from Taranto and hoped the driver would let me off on SS 106 at Tavole Palatine, having shown him a picture of the columns, and offered a reasonable gratuity tip, which he refused! Signs on the State Highway SS 106 forbid stopping, so I was carried to Metaponto train station. Enquiring at the station's Bar for a Taxi, I was informed there were no taxis in Metaponto. The point made, is the Tavole Palatine with its 15 columns remaining of the Temple of Hera are 4 to 5 kilometres from Metaponto village - alright for a 1-way walk! So a car is needed.
H.V. Morton in his book "A Traveller in Southern Italy" 1969 says that the small Museum at the Tavole Palatine site was opened in 1961.
3. The Metaponto Archaeological Park may be reached by foot from the train station. The directions in a well-known guide book are confusing. I did this walk in April 2013, being my 1st visit to Metaponto. On foot, walk from the train station to the second round-about, turn right, walk over the creek and past vineyards on well paved footpath (sidewalks) lined with an avenue of Australian eucalyptus, and the Park, after about 40 minutes walk is on your left. Free admission, and there is an open-air museum of collected, un-catalogued heavy masonry. The satellite picture on the Internet reveals much more than can be grasped from ground level. From the Park to the Tavole Palatine across country (not possible due to agricultural crops) is about 3 kilometres . Note the fencing on the opposite side of the road to the Park protecting this area towards the train line: apparently the vastness of ancient Metaponto also lies underneath.
Written November 16, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Maria
Ottawa, Canada57 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2015 • Couples
This place was deserted when we visited which made it even more striking to see. There is a little parking area off the road which doesn't cost anything. Walk past the chained driveway down the path to the temple. We went late afternoon but it would probably be nice to see at night.
Written November 6, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

SacramentoSteve
Sacramento, California, United States87 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2015 • Friends
Near-perfect Roman ruins isolated in a field about 3 minutes off the highway. Chances are you'll be there by yourself -- we went on a Monday mid-morning and there was no one in sight but the gates were open at what appeared to be a small museum. Signs are in English and Italian so you get a feel for the place. Took some cool pix.
Written October 3, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LexGrizzly
Diekirch, Luxembourg417 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2015 • Solo
For Italian circumstances, a location easy to find. This temple dedicated to Hera dates from the times when Metaponto was a Greek colony (VI th century BC), one of the oldest monuments in the area. Why this temple got the name Tavole Palatine seems to be related to the Carolingians who fought there against the Saracens in VIII AD. Pythagoras has taught there and seems to be buried there as well. To find the spot, coming from Taranto on the SS106 before Metaponto you will have a brown sign "Tavole Palatine" you should follow until no more sign apears and you will have found it on your right: a small museum with a parking spot will show you the way.
Written September 15, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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