Wat Chamthewi Temple (Wat Ku Kut)

Wat Chamthewi Temple (Wat Ku Kut)

Wat Chamthewi Temple (Wat Ku Kut)
4.5
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles58 reviews
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Jeep
1,378 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2021
This temple witness 2 significant people in 2 different eras.

After retired from the throne, queen Chamadevi spent her sunset years on practicing dharma at this temple. Her cremation was also held at this temple and her bone ash is still inside the beautiful laterite stupa. Around 1200 years since then, Kruba Sri Wichai (Lanna saint, community developer) renovated the abandoned temple and this was his last renovation. His body was also cremated at this temple and his bone ash is still in the temple as well.

The queen's stupa is in the shape of a 5 levels step pyramid. Each of the four sides in each level contains 3 Buddha statues fitted into the channels which makes a total of 3*4*5=60 statues. Moreover, there is a museum that exhibits life and past work of Kruba Sri Wichai in the wooden house nearby. Worth visiting.
Written February 19, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Suratrichard
Surat Thani, Thailand2,295 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2020 • Couples
We visited Wat Ku Kut after spending some time at the Wat Phra That Haripunchai also in Lamphun.
It's good to see such well preserved historical sites and Wat Ku Kut is no exception.
When we were there, it was the date of the Loy Krathong festival so it was busier than normal but mainly with Thais and very few foreigners. It was also decorated with paper lanterns as part of the festival.
Before visiting, it's a good idea to read up on the history of this ancient temple and its significance to the Thai nation.
Would certainly recommend a visit.
Written November 10, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Justin K
Shanghai, China284 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Solo
I hired a driver to take me to lamphun and we stopped here as the first site. According to rough guide this is the only complete example of haripunjaya architecture and there is definitely something magical about it. It also appears quite well preserved with only a bit of damage to several of the Buddha’s located in the niches. Get out of Chiang Mai for a bit and visit this site and Wat Phra That Haripunjaya.
Written April 6, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Pupae S
Thailand98 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2016 • Couples
This temple is near Wat Phra That Hariphunchai. This is a one of the historical place of Queen Chamdhevi.
Written May 15, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

John Jackson
Montego Bay, Jamaica39 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
I wrote a review under Kukut but there is no where to write about Lamphun so I have done it here.

Firstly, Lamphun is probably 3 hours from Chiang Mai if you walk. It is 30 km. Good for a day out from Chiang Mai but personally, I would not advise staying overnight.

Getting there is easy from CM. There are 2 trains in the morning - the express around 8:50 (50 baht) and around 30 minutes later the cheaper slower train (5 baht, and since it is the first stop slower is irrelevant). Sit in the front carriage since you have access to the driver's compartment. Also, on the express you need to have your passport. 20-25 minute journey.

When I arrived I was the only Lamphun passenger on the earlier express and there were only 2 motorbike taxis at the station. This is logical, the locals don't take the express and if I had thought about it I would not have. Wait half hour and pay 5 baht. There is nothing to gain in arriving 30 minutes earlier. Hence no 4 wheeled taxis for the first train. Hindsight is a fine thing.

If you do take the express and there are motorbike taxis they'll invariably try to steal your money by charging 50 baht. I doubt that the locals pay 10 for the ride on the back of a scooter. I walked 5 minutes to the hospital and got a ride from there. Left out of the station and then first right. Take the second train!

Returning is easy, you don't have to wait for the trains from Bangkok. There are minibuses and pickups that regularly go to CM. They park outside the museum. When you are site seeing you will see the stands. Ask yourself, will the train from Bangkok be on time? And also there is the aggravation of getting to the station. So rail to get there and the road to return.

You can see everything in a few hours at a very leisurely pace. I read that the old city is only 1000 by 500 metres at the widest points. Those figures are rounded up. The sites are documented on TripAdvisor so I shall say that in my opinion the highlight is Kakut. Better than anything in CM. From the museum it is around 15 minutes walk, maximum. The covered bridge on the river side of Wat Phra That Haripunchai is well worth visiting. I did not go to the museum because it was closed (closed Mon and Tues at the time of writing) but I did walk around the grounds so I can say it is very small.

This town is not Lampang which deserves an overnight stay. It is tiny. It is dead. I did not find anywhere that had English translated menus. A problem for none meat eaters in that every food photo in the menus that I saw contained animal. No bars. No life. It does not cater for tourists staying overnight.

Stay in CM and do a day trip. It is worth it to see Kukut. Wish I had done that.
Written March 20, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

blackeaglejim
Chiang Mai, Thailand289 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2018 • Solo
This temple is dedicated to Chamathewi, the Mon princess from Lawo, today’s Lopburi, who founded Haripunchai, now called Lamphun, in the late 9th century. About 1.5 km west of Wat Haripunchai, its most notable feature is the pair of old brick chedis first built in the early 12th century. The originals collapsed in an earthquake, were rebuilt in1218 and are in rather good condition today. The larger one, behind the viharn, Chedi Suwan Chang Kot, is a stepped pyramid on a square base, 21 meters high, of brick and stucco. Each side of its five tiers features three sculptures of standing Buddhas, making 60 altogether.
Around the corner of the modern temple building is Chedi Ratana. Similar in style, but on a hexagonal base and only 11.5 meters high, it has standing Buddha sculptures only in the niches on the bottom level. However, according to popular belief, Chedi Ratana contains the ashes of Queen Chamathewi. Together, these two chedis are rare and outstanding examples of ancient Mon architecture in Thailand.
Inside the viharn next to them are many wall murals depicting events in the life of Chamathewi: her arrival by boat, establishing herself in the city, fighting off enemies, etc. A small shrine near the entrance of the compound contains a standing image of the ancient queen.
Written June 6, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Agkarajit
Chiang Mai, Thailand1,424 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019 • Friends
On the ground of this temple is where the remaining relics of Queen Chamdhevi who is the first ruler of Nakorn Hariphunchai which was prospered over 1300 years ago. There is also a teakwood shrine in her memory where one can also paid respects to her great and sacred spirit.
Written July 25, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Marie M
Chiang Mai, Thailand528 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2018 • Friends
We went on a tour arranged by the Center for Lifelong Learning of Payap University. Our guide was Dr Ratanaporn, a professor of history. We had about two dozen people in the tour which left from Chiang Mai. We had two vans and the ride was very comfortable. The temple is simply incredible! The chedi dates back to the 8th century! There are others which are 12th c.
Standing Buddhas are in every tall niche of the oldest chedi. zit is said Queen Chamadhevi’s ashes are under it. There are murals inside the temple which depict the life or the Queen, beginning with her, as a toddler, being found in a large lotus, by a hermit who raised her until she reached puberty. Having the lecture from the history professor brought Chamadhevi to life! We wandered around the grounds taking photos and enjoying the sunny day. This is a temple not to be missed. If you are in northern Thailand, take a ride to Lamphun, a very charming city.
Written March 20, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

OoAaNn
Bangkok, Thailand8 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2017 • Solo
It located a bit further out and you will need a car to get there. The Chedi and surrounding area was well kept. The principle Chedi is remarkable and worth a visit by itself.
Written January 19, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Wingfield73
Chiang Mai, Thailand1,014 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2017 • Couples
The two main stupas of this remarkable temple are eight centuries old, the largest of which is adorned with some sixty statues of the standing Buddha. These are of the highest quality, both well preserved and the equal of those in Ankor Wat. The relatively modern ordination hall is striking and similar to most of those the be found in Chiang Mai city.
However do reserve five minutes to look at the modern wooden abbot's house immediately to the right of the entrance to the temple grounds. The ostentatious use of massive quantities of varnished teak wood is well worth a glance either to admire - or to be horrified!
Written November 29, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Wat Chamthewi Temple (Wat Ku Kut), Lamphun

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