Palace of Nestor
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Temporarily closed until further notice

Palace of Nestor

Palace of Nestor
4.5
Temporarily closedClosed until further notice
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles195 reviews
Excellent
108
Very good
57
Average
20
Poor
4
Terrible
6

pgalpin
Kirton in Lindsey, UK658 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2020
Yet again TA has it wrong and this place is open. If historic sites are your thing and you in the area it’s worth a quick stop but probably not the €6 each to get in. However there is a combined ticket giving access to other places which would be better value. One good thing, the toilets are right beside the car park and very clean. You can use them without actually entering the site.
Written September 17, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

chammp
Modbury, UK1,335 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2011
We visited here whilst passing on a hot day. The site is the excavations of King Nestor's Ancient Palace and are interesting. We did not have a guide so had to rely on the signs but these were enough. The cost of entry was 4 Euros for adults and 3 Euros for children. The excavations are under a large canopy to protect them and also presumably to make viewing them a more pleasant experience. The palace is quite large although not well preserved (you have to stick to walkways). There are mainly ruins of walls but there is also an ancient bath tub and some decorative tiling as well to look at. It is a ruin but it is nonetheless interesting if you're the sort of person who likes that sort of thing. You won't spend more than three quarters of an hour there I'd say, but it is nice, particularly when combined with a visit to the honeycomb tomb that is along a track from the car park (entry to this is free).
Written August 12, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ptahsuti
98 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2013 • Couples
As of 27 March 2013 the palace site is closed. If we understood the gate attendant correctly it will remain closed for the whole of 2013 whilst unspecified "works" are carried out. At time of writing this is not made clear on the Greek culture ministry website. I'd strongly advise checking in advance if coming from a distance. The site museum in nearby Chora remains open.
Written April 2, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Daniel F
Antrim, UK92 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Friends
I have visited this magnificent Bronze age site on almost every occasion I have traveled to the Peloponnese over the years, and have never been disappointed. However, when I discovered four years ago that it was closed for refurbishment (and some other excavations), with the intention of replacing the old, though still substantial, shelter over the site, and including an elevated walkway, I suspected it would disjoint the emotional experience by not being able to walk around it at ground level.
I was wrong.
Ok, you cannot stand and stare from close quarters at the faded colors around the massive central hearth, or no longer be in virtual touching distance of Nestor's actual bathtub still preserved from circa 3500 years ago. But the elevated view provides a much more satisfactory sensation of the palace as the working, living and relaxing entity it was.
My apprehension was groundless. They did a wonderful job - and they are still excavating around it.
Written May 31, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Visitor_from_Athens
Athens, Greece279 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2016 • Couples
There are quite a few mistakes among the various reviews attributed to this very important archaeological site. (One reviewer talks about Pylos town, another the Museum of Chora, a third the Tsiklitiras House in Pylos.). The Palace of Nestor is none of these. It is the best preserved Bronze Age palace on the Greek mainland, reopened after closure for 30 months (NOT 6 years as one reviewer writes), a step that was entirely necessary to ensure protection of the remains for future generations. Now the remains are covered by a glorious new roof and accompanied by ample signage and with a new information building. Let's hear it for the archaeologists and architects and engineers who made it all possible, as well as for the many others who worked at the site recently while closed. A job very well done.
And as mentioned by others, the Palace is on the main road to Chora, a bit hard to find at present because of roadwork. Drive from Pylos north through Yialova, after that follow signs to Kyparissia and Chora. Tha will involve a hard right turn (ignoring left turns to Voidokoilia or Costanavarino. New signage should soon be erected.
Written July 24, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

gizmo38
Grenoble, France1,257 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2016 • Couples
This is a review of Nestor's Palace, which is about 4 km south of Chora, on the Pylos road. It is not in Pylos. If driving from Pylos or Gialova, you will see the modernistic steel roof protecting the excavations on the left side of the road before reaching Chora. There is a car park. As far as I know, the site is not served by public transport. Near the car park, in the opposite direction to the palace, there's a well preserved tholos (beehive) tomb.
The site reopened in June 2016, with a new roof protecting it, and walkways which give a good view of the layout. The entrance fee is 6€ for adults, and 3€ for EU nationals over 65. There are toilets, and a "video room" which was interesting.
Fortunately, there are plenty of information boards in Greek and English, showing what each room might have looked like and been used for. Without these, most visitors would have no idea what the ruins represent. The ruins are mostly remains of walls, about 60 to 100 cm high. In one area ther is a bath.
There's no museum on site, which is a pity. To visit the museum, head into Chora, then follow the signs - it's on the far side. It costs 2€, and just 1€ for over 65's. It needs a makeover, as information is very sparse. It contains mainly pottery from the palace site, and some small pieces of frieze decoration.
Written July 19, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Gelim
Rookhope158 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Couples
Nestor's Palace is closed until further notice, there was no indication of this when we travelled (in June 2013) and no sign of it re-opening any time soon. The museum is interesting but you really need to see the palace to appreciate what you're looking at. Also, with the exception of one tiny piece, the gold exhibits are away for restoration - again, no indication of when they will be returned. All in all, not worth the (long) drive at the moment.
Written July 18, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

stinkwink
Sydney, Australia7,281 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2017 • Couples
Only a few km from Chora, on the hill of Epano Eglianos, is the ancient mysterious Palace of Nestor. After three years of restoration, it finally reopened in 2016. Under a huge protective tent lies that remained from the once two story palace, overlooking the Bay of Navarino. What a place it had to be once,3500 years ago, with its 4 buildings, and 105 ground floor rooms! It is easy to imagine the stunning view from the second level.
In only one room 2,853 drinking cups were found. The definitely knew how to live. I wouldn’t mind being the guest on one of these parties.
My favorite was the bath, that magically stayed nearly intact. Not far from the bathtub there is a low wall with the remained bottoms of two large jugs on the top They allegedly were used to keep the water to pour onto the bather. If that was the case, they used assorted tall men for this job, or they stood at a chair o be able to reach the water.
It was an interesting fact, that the fire destroying the palace, actually preserved the
It is hard to tell anything new about the Palace of Nestor, that those other travelers didn’t mention in their reviews already, but I’d like to give you an advice. Someone complained, that there is no proper guide book or leaflet about this palace, “no printouts with further info available, no mini shop to get books about the palace or Mycenaean Civilization”.
This is all true but you can find numerous detailed information about the current location on the placards beside them. Walking on the boardwalk above the palace, you always guided to know, what are you seeing. To prove it, I included a few of them in my photos. The other possibility, that I like to use, is to make some research on the Internet about the place, that I intend to visit. You know Google is your friend. From there you can copy as many info as you like, and since it’s electronic, it won’t gather dust lying on your bookshelf.
Written May 17, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Bill M
Burnley, UK50 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2016 • Couples
This is a triumph of 21st century engineering backed by EU cash - but - although it will be popular with tours for its toilets and accessibility - remains a poor display of what should be an iconic site. Nestor turns in his grave at what has been done to his palace!
Written October 4, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Hippocleides
London, UK145 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2016 • Couples
For the last three times I’d visited the site I had to be content with peering through the fence.
Large sums of money have been spent on protecting the site under a vast curved roof. There is a very clever walkway over the palace so that visitors can imagine they are looking down on everyday life from the first floor balcony.
The explanatory boards are exemplary. No need for any guide book. You can now see exactly where Odysseus’ son Telemachus took his bath; where the banqueting around the great hearth in the throne room took place; where the Linear B archives were stored and where the truly amazing, almost industrial quantities of ceramic ware were stacked on shelves.
This is by far the best Mycenaean site in Greece. Mycenae and Tiryns may be more spectacular, but if you want to visualise Homeric Greece, then this is the place.
In the entrance there's an excellent small display explaining the decipherment of Linear B and the workings of the palace economy
A new museum is being constructed at nearby Chora. The present one suffers from a rather old fashioned method of displaying the finds, but is worth a quick visit if only to marvel at the sheer quantity of pottery produced at the palace.
I suspect this site will feature heavily on the tourist trail. The road leading to the site has been improved and new concrete paths make access easy.
Written September 29, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Palace of Nestor - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

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