Mastaba of Mereruka
Mastaba of Mereruka
4.5
Ancient RuinsPoints of Interest & Landmarks
About
Dating back to the 6th Dynasty (2323-2150 BC), this is the largeset tomb complex in Saqqara housing the remains of Mereruka (vizier to King Teti I), magnificent wall paintings, a stone ring for tethering sacrificial animals and a life-size statue of Mereruka walking forward from a false door.
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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles54 reviews
Excellent
36
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18
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KDJERO
Saint Charles, MO771 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2023
This tomb was amazing, and I must admit that I didn't even know it existed. The wall art scenes were iconic of ancient Egypt! When you think of Saqqara, you think of the step pyramid, but definitely don't miss this tomb while your are there...very impressive!
Written March 28, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

redeco
Warren, MA9,302 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
One of the my first experiences in Egypt was the first morning at my tour. We visited Memphis and Saqqara, among my favorite spots in Egypt. After seeing the step pyramid of Djoser and the pyramid of Unas and of Teti, we toured the mastaba of Mereruka. This official's tomb is among the largest in Saqqara and includes thirty three chambers, most of them heavily carved with hunting scenes of fish, birds, hippos, and more. The wall paintings are particularly exciting and the statue of Mereruka striding forward from a false door in the main chamber is unforgettable.

Mereruka was the vizier and son-in-law of King Teti, whose pyramid is next door. Don't miss the stone ring in the main chamber where sacrificial animals were tethered before slaughter. Take your time; explore; and don't miss the myriad of passageways that connect the various chambers. Many of the tomb paintings here are remarkably fresh. No photos are allowed inside.
Written May 9, 2009
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

cw f
Brasschaat, Belgium183 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Couples
In Saqqara the most interesting private tomb of all: large paintings and carvings all over the place, depicting daily life from the deseased. Very well preserved. One can't miss to visit it. Fabulous.
Written July 29, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

retireeVancouver
Vancouver, Canada1,829 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2017 • Couples
We went into Idut's tomb to see the same reliefs that others have described below. Perhaps Idut's tomb was part of the Mastaba of Mereruka - the guide did mention a visit to that mastaba - but the sign on the door only said "Idut's Tomb". This tomb was located close (walking distance) to Zoser 's step pyramid and the Pyramid of Unas. These 3 sights were combined by our Uniworld Nile River cruise guide for our excursion to the Saqqara complex. At Udut's tomb, there was no guard at the door; there was no extra admission; we photographed the images extensively.

This tomb had wonderfully decorated walls. There was no sarcophagus. At ground level, we entered a narrow hall to examine the raised relief carvings that depicted the activities that went into the preparation of a feast or food offerings. The first reliefs we saw were at eye level and depicted fishing methods. The fish that swam under the fishing boats were so well chiseled that they could be easily identified. The detail of each boat in the water showed the wood sections used to construct it, the twisted rope that held it together, the 2 pointed boat ends, and the number of rowers needed to navigate it. Fishing methods varied from long skinny nets, already filled with small fish, to multiple hooked fishing lines used to catch the larger fish. Another scene showed the men fowling. In the papyrus marshes, where they had cut stems of the reed, ducks were swimming, but also some that were caught were poking their heads out of sacks kept in the boat. In another fishing scene, hippopotamus and crocodiles were at the water's edge. Even the sharp pointed teeth of these animals had been carved. One man in the boat aimed his bow and arrow at these animals and fish. Another wall had several registers going to the ceiling which showed other foods that were needed for the feast. I loved the hunting scene - perhaps a herd of cattle. While several men roped up the legs of the prone bull, another was already butchering it. Its hacked off legs were being carried to the "kitchen" where a big pot was on a stove. Geese were also being brought in to be cooked. Another good image showed a row of servants carrying trays piled high with the food - fruits, breads, drink. One of them had a dog or a goat on a lead that walked along side. Hieroglyphics were placed around all images. Perhaps they described the activities. The details of these carvings were so enjoyable as they were so clear and complete - no imagination needed to "read" the story they told.

Some images still had color. The men's bodies were painted brown. They wore a white kilt; they all had tightly curled black hair; all were barefoot. The hind quarters of the bulls were a light brown. Wings of ducks were black; bread was golden. Green fragments colored ends of material - a towel perhaps.

Crowded into this narrow long space, our group needed to stay only about 10 minutes to take photos and marvel at the skill of these fine raised carvings done so very long ago (Dynasty 5). A worthwhile stop in the Saqqara complex.
Written March 15, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

zsy
Budapest350 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2012 • Friends
... in March 2012. We have visited it in 2001, it was open that time. This tomb is one of the most beautiful tombs in the Saqqara area. Don't be sad, there are many other tombs and mastabas open, that are as nice as this one.
Written March 20, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TravelGipsy
Naples, FL92 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
Thanks to our wonderful guide Hend. We’ve been several times, but never we saw the wonderful places that most tours miss. That is the difference between a great guide!
Written December 10, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Matthew P
London, UK5,995 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2019
Its wall to wall Images of Hieroglyphics, telling long ago stories of ancient Egyptian Pharohs. A joy to behold, as you walk around you realise how long it must have taken to prepare this place ready for the mummmy to be laid to rest. All of the preperations to enable the soul to have an after life.
Written September 10, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Richard8016
Sacramento, CA185 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2019
You always hear about the Pyramids and major temples of Egypt and who built what where. I had never heard of this place. It was one of the stops along our tour. Interesting place, worth a quick look.
Written September 7, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

steve w
Alexandria, Egypt45 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Solo
If you dig heiroglyphics,this si the place to visit,its a fantastic way to introduce your self to the ancients and their unique style of writing,
Written March 4, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David B
Bruce, Australia994 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2018 • Couples
The Tomb of Mereruka was a serious challenge. It required a steep climb down a long and very narrow and low passage. When I reached the lowest level my back was aching and I saw that there was at least as far again to go so I gave up and made my way back up. I was soaked by the time I resurfaced. I took this as a sage warning for further tomb exploration. On the surface there was no relief. It was just a matter of standing in the sun and enjoying it, knowing that my friends back in Canberra were freezing at the same time.
Written July 19, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Mastaba of Mereruka, Saqqara

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