We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The Tripadvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Bolingbroke Castle

71 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.

Bolingbroke Castle

71 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
71Reviews1Q&A
Traveler rating
  • 32
  • 31
  • 7
  • 1
  • 0
Traveler type
Time of year
Language
Selected filters
  • Filter
  • English
Popular mentions
Carol B wrote a review Nov 4
Birmingham, United Kingdom4,714 contributions667 helpful votes
+1
Monday 19 October 20, I went with my friend to ‘Bolingbroke Castle’ which is under the care of the English Heritage. Bolingbroke Castle was one of three castles built by Ranulf de Blundeville, Earl of Chester and Lincoln, in the 1220’s after his return from the Crusades. The other castles being Beeston Castle and Chartley Castle. After Blundeville’s death, the castle remained in the ownership of the Earls of Lincoln and was later inherited through marriage by John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster. As an extremely powerful member of the royal court, with royal connections, John of Gaunt became the guardian of Richard II when the young king succeeded to the throne at the age of 10 years old. John of Gaunt and his first wife, Blanche, lived at the castle during the 1360s. Their son, Henry of Bolingbroke, was born there in 1367. Their son Henry had a tempestuous relationship with Richard II and was exiled in 1397. He returned to England after the death of his father in 1399, enraged that the king had seized the estates he had inherited. Richard was in Ireland, attempting to quell a rising, when he heard of Henry’s return. These events marked the end of Richard II’s reign. Henry of Bolingbroke was encouraged to claim the throne of England from his unpopular rival, and Richard was imprisoned. Soon afterwards, Henry was crowned king as Henry IV. There is no evidence to suggest that Henry IV ever returned to his birthplace again and lived in the castle. The main function of Bolingbroke castle during the 15th and 16th centuries was as an administrative centre for the estates of the Duchy of Lancaster. The names of the towers, i.e. the Auditor’s Tower and Receiver’s Tower, refer to their use during this period. Surveys undertaken at the castle in the 17th century show that only a few of the towers then remained in use and that the enclosing walls were extremely dilapidated. During the Civil War, the castle became a defensible base for a Royalist garrison and was besieged by Parliamentarian forces in 1643. The Royalists surrendered this castle in the winter of 1643, and the entire castle was destroyed. My friend and I entered through the gatehouse towers into the open central area of the castle. Bolingbroke Castle is a prime example of 13th-century architectural design and is described as an ‘enclosure’ castle. Such castles are characterised by curtain walls with towers enclosing a courtyard. Within this courtyard there would have been timber-framed structures, including a great hall and service buildings, evidence of which was found in excavations during the 1960s. The south-west tower, known as the King’s Tower, was rebuilt between 1444 and 1456 on an octagonal plan. By this time, the castle was more than 200 years old, and this remodelling represents an attempt by the owners to express their wealth and importance. From the Auditor’s Tower can be seen the Rout Yard – the field to the south of the castle – which contains several earthworks, including a rectangular enclosure. My friend and I mooched round this lovely castle for a couple of hours and we took some very nice photographs of the castle and surrounding areas. If you like castles, this is well worth visiting if you are in the area.
Read more
Date of experience: October 2020
1 Helpful vote
Helpful
Share
Maria C wrote a review Oct 2020
Loughton, United Kingdom129 contributions37 helpful votes
Bolingbroke castle ruins are the lower outer wall ruins with a dried up moat around the outside. This is a lovely place to pay a visit to if your in the area and to go for walk but you would find it hard to spend more than an hour to hour and a half here. There are information boards around the grounds which explain which each of the rooms would have been used for and a rough idea of what they would have looked like which is quite interesting.
Read more
Date of experience: September 2020
Helpful
Share
carolannrichardson wrote a review Sep 2020
Lincoln, United Kingdom34 contributions6 helpful votes
Interesting place to visit especially for young children. Although the outer walls are not tall you can get a feel of how the castle was laid out and good information on the boards in each section. A bit overgrown in the surrounding paths. Down a very small lane, tiny area for parking near the gate and someone blocked the road entirely and we had to find them to get out.
Read more
Date of experience: August 2020
Helpful
Share
Amanda H wrote a review Aug 2020
2 contributions
Nice little place for a picnic and look around. Parking very limited down a single track road. Free to get in and not very busy. No facilities there but thats expected. You can walk around the outside of the ruins but its overgrown and could do with cutting back. Plenty of information boards explaining things. If we went again, we'd definitely take a picnic.
Read more
Date of experience: August 2020
Helpful
Share
lgreen9 wrote a review Aug 2020
Northampton, United Kingdom359 contributions88 helpful votes
Visited to our on our way to a mablethorpe camp site. Visited in the rain with dog and children. We enjoyed exploring the remaining walls and the signs really helped to inspire. Beautiful views. Easy to find using sat nav. A bit of parking near the gate.
Read more
Date of experience: August 2020
Helpful
Share
Previous
Frequently Asked Questions about Bolingbroke Castle