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Cattedrale Di S. Aurea

83 Reviews
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Cattedrale Di S. Aurea

83 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
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Piazza della Rocca 13, 00119 Ostia Antica Italy
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Horse Riding Trail in Ancient Rome
Day Trips

Horse Riding Trail in Ancient Rome

40 reviews
Swap the busy streets of Rome for a more peaceful way of exploring local sights—a horse riding tour through the ancient ruins of Ostia Antica. As it’s a private tour, there’s no need to worry about the trip being crowded, and you have a guide with you at all times. See remote sights that are often missed by tourists, and look out for local wildlife such as hawks, turtles, herons, foxes, and more.
$90.14 per adult
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Peter S wrote a review Aug 2020
Rome, Italy2,777 contributions205 helpful votes
+1
Review of Basilica di Sant’Aurea, Ostia Antica, Rome. It was 25 years ago this month that we were first inside the Basilica di Sant’Aurea; it was also our first wedding invitation in Italy – a couple of friends were getting married. All those years ago. It really was a special occasion and, not least, in this exquisite Basilica set in the 15th century Borgo di Gregoriopolis in Ostia Antica. What a delightful place to express your love for someone - to commit for life; what a pleasure to be invited. It sounds insensitive to describe the setting as a film set but, on occasion that is exactly what it is – the Borgo/fortified village of Gregioropolis is where you capture those images of medieval Italy – narrow streets, buildings leaning into each other, wall lamps and a spacious central piazza next to the Castello di Giulio II with a fountain to one side. If you’re passing the place at the right time, you may catch a glimpse of a film/television crew at work - you’ll see the livestock, carts, fittings, street furniture and more that help determine the period. Parked outside the wall there are usually a handful of large panel trucks providing equipment, technicians, power and people as required. Novel. The Basilica comes with the period and is located at the far end of the central Piazza della Rocca. Enter through the main gate in the wall that opens on to the piazza and the Basilica is straight ahead of you and dominated by the Castle and surrounding earthworks/moat to the right. The Castle is considerably larger, brilliant white during daytime and, for much of the year, lit up at night. This is where you capture the reality/delight of Italy of an evening … after an enjoyable meal at one of the local restaurants … shadows and images; this is romance with a capital ‘R’. The Basilica is in period renaissance architectural style and built of pink masonry with detail work in travertine limestone. It comprises a small rectangular building with a bell tower at one end. The main entrance is set in a façade of four pilasters standing on carved panels and over-looking the piazza. A central rose window with eight lights contained in a dished brick frame is set high in the façade. The symmetry of the façade is disrupted by a large white tablet with worn inscription and dating from 1635. Enter by the steps from the central piazza and there’s this immediate impression of light and simplicity – the small single-span spacious interior, windows set high in the undecorated walls and the alter at the far end is dominated by a large oval painting. The central nave/aisle and sparse open seating makes it easy to follow the service. To the right of the nave is a chapel dedicated to Saint Monica. Fixed to the wall of the chapel behind a protective plastic is a sepulchral stone that was dug up near the church 85 years ago. Etched in the stone is the funerary epigraph. Originally from North Africa Monica followed her eldest son Augustine to Rome. The pair of them subsequently embraced the embryonic Christian beliefs that were rapidly replacing the collection of original Roman Gods that had dominated the Western Empire thought to its demise in the fourth-fifth Century CE. Santa Monica is the patron saint of Alcoholics, Conversion, Married Women and Mothers – varied patronage then. And that dedicated name ‘Basilica Sant’Aurea’? Stories suggest that the sacred remains of the martyr Sant’Aurea were interred in what may have been an early Christian church/cemetery on or near the same site >1,000 years before the current Basilica was built. There are reputed to have been five Paleochristian churches in the area during the final years of Ostia Antica Port – three in the town and two outside. Having explored the interior of the Basilica, exit and, before leaving the place, sit to one side of the steps outside with your back to the wall. Take a moment to appreciate your setting - the castle to your left (with that dominant ravelin) outside the entrance, the section of surrounding wall/main gate that you can see across the piazza and, to your right, the small fountain that once supplied potable water to the community. Large collections of potted plants are stacked outside some of the nearest houses. The Borgo, of course, is pedestrianized. You are back in the 15th century – this … is … as … good … as … it … gets. Peter Steele 31 August 2020
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Date of experience: September 2019
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Jeanne Noel W wrote a review Nov 2019
28 contributions
+1
We were pleasantly surprised by this small cathedral within the walls of this ancient city. The beautiful baptismal font and ceiling’s architecture stood out within the interior. In the exterior there were Roman carved blocked cornices which seem to tell the history of this modest cathedral.
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Date of experience: October 2019
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David O wrote a review Mar 2019
Purcellville, Virginia99 contributions3 helpful votes
+1
Nice spot to walk through while in Ostia, church is old with great history. Little village with cobblestone streets.
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Date of experience: March 2019
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topcandidate wrote a review Apr 2018
Rome, Italy20 contributions5 helpful votes
The church in.this plaza still holds one Saint but once held Saint Monica - I knew exactly where she once was on entering this church - a side room mid-way up on the right - you could fell the present of a major saint of Christ. Saint Monica is now in a church in the plaza of Navona you might of visited in a walking tour - in rome. Check your Rome tourist map its on a line with the Pantheon and Fontana Di Trevi. Saint Monica California was named for this Major Christian Saint - some of whom you just know - are still active.
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Date of experience: March 2018
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Chinapjs wrote a review Nov 2017
Washington DC, District of Columbia3,705 contributions910 helpful votes
Not sure if this is technically inside or outside the archeological site. We visited it while seeing the ruins. Well worth taking a look at it
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Date of experience: November 2017
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