Gallipoli National Park
Gallipoli National Park
5
National ParksBattlefieldsMonuments & Statues
About
Gallipoli was the site of a major battle in World War I and this peninsula, part of the Dardanelles, is still remembered as a major defeat for the Allied Forces—and a springboard for the future Turkish leader Mustafa Kemal. The beautiful, quiet park is dotted with memorials and other features; it is the site of a big annual memorial for the thousands of Australian and New Zealand forces who died here.
Duration: More than 3 hours
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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5.0
5.0 of 5 bubbles245 reviews
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195
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1TraveltheWorld
Alice Springs, Australia12,398 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2015 • Friends
The whole National Park highlights the tragedies of war.

A once historic place of horror, is now a place of honour.

From courage and significant casualties, grew a significant place of commemoration.

With past heroism, to present heartbreak.

From ravage and rivalry, to roses and remembrance.

The magnitude of what transpired here, will never be forgotten.

A tour through Gallipoli is truly an emotional and moving experience.
Written October 27, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

gonmel
Ankara, Türkiye248 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2013 • Couples
that is history and really emotional..there are a lot of places to visit in gallipoli and these places are far from each other so it is recommended to go there by car / bus / vehicles or etc.
Written August 16, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Brian S
Melbourne, Australia248 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2011 • Couples
The Gallipoli Peninsula National Historic Park and lower peninsula national park covers a surprisingly large area and takes more than a full day by car or bus to explore adequately. We were based in Canakkale and used private car and driver for much of our four week trip through Turkey.
However, we were strongly advised to book a tour to get the most from a visit and choose RSL tours with a local office in Kilitbahir across the strait from Canakkale. Talking to fellow travellers most companies offering the Gallipoli Tours were rated as excellent and had guides exceedingly knowledgable with the Turkish and Allied opposition forces involvement during WW1.
The peninsula is well maintained and a credit to locals and the Turkish Government. Landing places, cemetries, monuments and high vantage points of the rugged natural beauty are covered in six hours with no rushing from site to site.
Mid October was warm (27 degrees) with only a few hundred visitors spread over a wide area thus allowing peaceful exploration of sites in a respectful manner.
Written January 29, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ktee1
England169 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
We ended up staying here for a week in the middle of November and stayed at the accommodation owned by the wargrave commission. It was cold but the sun shone and we had an incredible time. The place itself is incredibly moving, it is wild and it is possible to almost begin to imagine what it must have been like for those poor soldiers during the war. There are some fascinating museums which help you to understand further the attrocities that happened there. Standing in a graveyard surrounded by the graves of hundreds of young soldiers was incredibly moving.
Written August 25, 2007
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ana V
Eugene, OR655 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2019
This was a very moving place. It is an extremely beautiful peninsula and yet so much suffering took place there once upon a time. It is a beautiful memorial to the Ottoman and Australian soldiers that fought here and died. It is now a peaceful and beautiful memorial.
Written December 20, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

AandASL
Christchurch, New Zealand82 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019
Brilliant place to pay your respects to the many fallen men.
Be prepared for some tiring climbs if you visit some of the out of the way cemeteries, but most are easy to find with easy access.
Most difficult part of visiting is finding safe places to park if you have your own transport as the roads are not that wide with quite steep angled drop offs on both sides.

Regards
Adrian & Anna (NZ)
Written July 4, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Roddek
Melbourne, Australia538 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2017
We travelled approximately 4000 kms around Turkey, commencing in Istanbul and finally boarding a ferry from Canakkale, across the Darneldenelles, and culminating our trip in Gallipoli/Istanbul.
My first impression on arrival in Gallipoli was the size of Anzac cove. The cove is best known for the Australian, New Zealanders, British, Indian and the Turkish soldiers, as a site of the amphibious landing. I walked along a narrow stretch of the beach, ( in 1915 it had extended about 50 metres into the water) in my attempt to visualize the landing of the Anzacs at this very spot was a moving experience. Looking from a different angle, the Cove is a rugged Turkish coastline with narrow beaches and steep scree covered hills behind it. There are numerous trails through this area, one which leads to the Australian memorial at Lone Pine and the famous hill known as Chunuk Bair which is the New Zealand memorial. You will certainly see these memorials with a heavy heart, but leave enlightened.
As I cast my eyes in the direction of the mighty cliff, it would have been a terrifying ordeal for the Anzacs knowing that the Ottoman soldiers lay high on the hill in a commanding position, whilst the Anzacs had no cover and would have been sittings ducks!
Today, this part of the cove is quite breathtaking with sweeping views of the Aegean coastline on either side, and the many cruise ships and yachts that would ply this part of ocean, making it a tourist mecca. But a 100 years ago, this would have been a bloody area with thousands of bodies floating around.
From Anzac cove we moved across to Lone Pine and Chunuk Bair, exploring the fateful events of the ill fateful war. There are information boards at these important sites and well recommended reading. The Lone Pine Ridge memorial records the names of the 7000 diggers and Turks who were killed or wounded in four days of vicious trench warfare. The larger memorial lists the thousands of Anzacs who killed or wounded.
The lawns, cemetery plots and gardens are meticulously maintained by the Turks, and it encapsulates the strong bond forged between Anzac nations and Turkey. , And as I close the curtain on a sad note, let us never forget the words from Gen. Aturturk the Turkish leader cast in stone. Here are the those poignant words:
Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives… you are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace…There is no difference the Johnnies and the Mehmets..to us where they lie side by side in this country of ours…You, the mothers who sent their sons to faraway countries, wipe away your tears…your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace. After having lost their lives on this land, they have become our sons as well.
Those were wonderful words, and a moving gesture of peace and insight into the heart of a great leader of the Turkish people.
Tips and recommendations:
The logistics between Istanbul and Gallipoli is always an issue. Best to book a day tour and transfers before your arrival in Turkey. If you intend covering a day trip to Gallipoli, it is an early morning departure, and a very late arrival back into Istanbul. Best book two nights in Canakkale and do the crossing at your own leisure. Turkey had magnificent sights all around the country, and I would recommend a 10 day escorted tour catching in the superb sights in the hands of a reputable tour company named Neon Tours.

Written April 24, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

John L
Yorkshire, UK787 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2014 • Couples
We were part of a party to visit the Gallipoli peninsula that were mainly Antipodean and the guide reflected this with a concentration of the ANZAC part of the campaign. The landing in what became known as ANZAC cove was several miles away from the planned position and faced steep hills to take, an almost impossible task. Later ANZAC landings followed by English and French were little more successful and poor command turned the campaign to a debacle.
The graveyards were poignant, young men who had come to the other end of the earth to their death. As we drove to the New Zealand memorial the road ran along no man’s land with evidence of the trenches on either side only yards apart. Our final stop was at the Turkish memorial, remembering that young patriots from both sides ended their lives in mass graves.
One of the graveyards gave words of Ataturk, a soldier who repulsed the Allied landings and later became president of the new Turkey.
"Those heroes that shed their blood and lost their lives…
You are now lying in the soil of a friendly country. Therefore rest in peace. There is no difference between the Johnnies and the Mehmets (Turkish soldier nickname), to us where they lie side by side here in this country of ours…
You, the mothers, who sent their sons from faraway countries wipe away your tears; your sons are now lying in our bosom and are in peace, after having lost their lives on this land they have become our sons as well.".
You have to remember that Gallipoli was a great victory for the Turks and this statement is a remarkable recognition of the sacrifice given by young patriots on both sides of the conflict.
Written May 1, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

scottee
Leumeah Australia78 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2012 • Friends
We arrived late afternoon and there was no one there.It was very moving to just wander quietly through Anzac Cove and read the headstones.It was impossible to hold back the tears as you read the ages of the young men who were led to their death.When you looked at the hills they really had little hope.The memorials are all beautifully looked after. When we visited Lone Pine a very young Turkish girl walked up to one of the Australian soldiers grave and placed an Australian flag beside his headstone...how moving. The Turkish people lost so many young men as well yet they show such respect and love of the Australian people who visit.Every Australian should come here and maybe we would learn a little more tolerance in our own lives.
Written September 24, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sarah_Dubai044
Dubai1 contribution
5.0 of 5 bubbles
I just returned home after my Anzac Day tour with Travel Shop Turkey, marking the 95th Anniversary of the Anzac Day memorial services at Gallipoli, Turkey.

I would like to make a special thanks to everyone at Travel Shop Turkey for their efforts in putting together the tours for us this year given all the headaches we experienced with cancellations and delays in our flights.

I have been to Gallipoli for an Anzac Day service before, this time my first trial of Travel Shop Turkey's services. Their value for money packages far exceed the quality and level of service we experienced on other tours especially the way our guide handled our bus at Anzac Cove when the New Zealand president decided to make a private tour of the museums.

The food at the barbeque was nice and fresh, but the venue is a little outdated. Me and my husband feel we are really lucky this year because we were provided an Anzac conference, a forum presented in a 5 star hotel in the centre of taksim, full of information about the history and significance of the event. The expert historians from New Zealand, Australia and Turkey were fantastic.

Thank you for giving us an informative and well-rounded experience this year.
Written May 8, 2010
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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