Monti Sartorius
Monti Sartorius
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Duration: 2-3 hours
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Brun066
Florence, Italy13,116 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2021
These seven marvelous craters have been named after Wolfgang Sartorius von Waltershausen (1809-1876), German geologist and physicist, graduated in Gottingen, having among his masters such personalities as Carl Friedrich Gauss, arranged in a "buttonhole", that is, along a more or less straight line, as a consequence of an eruption which lasted for the whole of the first half of 1865; they today can be visited with a pleasant and all in all easy walk.
There doesn't appear a particular reason to name this one rather than other Etna volcanic phenomena after Sartorius: he was not on the spot at the eruption time.
In fact, by this time he had already made the vast majority of his observations on the Italian volcano, after long stays made in the fourth and fifth decade of the nineteenth century, and rather devoted himself to the study of Icelandic volcanism, carrying out only brief control visits on Etna.
Rather, the attribution of "Sartorius" name to the craters is overall a consequence of the recognition of the inestimable merits of the German geologist in the study of the volcano; study which produce the two powerful volumes of "Der Aetna" (published posthumously, in 1880) and the "Atlas des Aetnas" (1843).
The excursion to the craters, as mentioned, is relatively easy, and probably represents the easiest way to get acquainted with the morphology of Etna volcanic phenomena, without climbing to great heights.
We have only covered a small part of the possible routes in this area, limiting ourselves to climbing the first crater we encounter (after 15 minutes of walking) coming from the paved road to Rifugio Citelli.
Even with this minimal program, there are many appreciable and evocative phenomena: the birch formations you cross to reach the base of the cone, unique on Etna and in all of southern Europe: the "pillows" of "spino santo" (holy thorn; Astracantha sicula [Biv.] Greuter), endemic plant of Etna, which here is presented in its best form; the contrast between the mineral nature of the emissions, still featuring to large sterile surfaces, and the shrubs and trees that anyhow go to conquer the slopes.
In conclusion, this is a route that we highly recommend.
Written September 4, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Andydjp
Stotfold, UK638 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
We had an hour long walk through the birch woods and up the lava ‘button’ craters. The views across to the higher areas of Etna and down to the coast were stunning. Incredible landscape which shows the destructive power of the lava but also the beauty of the volcano and surrounding countryside. Recommended as part of a tour or alone.
Written October 10, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ondadimare
Italy16,007 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2023 • Friends
…I traveled a beautiful itinerary in this area of Etna!!…”Sartorius Mountains”!!…they took their name from a German scholar/geologist and astronomer who was the first to cartographically report the most important eruptions of Etna!!… the first lava flow occurred here!!…characteristic landscape!!…with the craters extinct and with nature slowly starting to take its course again!!…the paths are quite simple and practicable!!…in any case with trekking shoes obviously !!…fantastic walking on what were the lapilli of the eruption!!l…you arrive on the extinct craters and from there you can also see Taormina!!…and all the fantastic landscape that surrounds us!!…also very special to see the wonderful Etna birch trees with white bark which is also the highest birch forest in Europe!!…absolutely worth seeing if you are in these parts!!…
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Written October 2, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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