School of Aristotle
School of Aristotle
4
About
Duration: < 1 hour
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Tours & experiences
Explore different ways to experience this place.
The area
Reach out directly

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles58 reviews
Excellent
26
Very good
18
Average
10
Poor
4
Terrible
0

Jydeoo
Lagos, Nigeria2,311 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2023 • Solo
Two tips.
1. To make the most of my visit, I had obtained a seven-site pass, which included access to this school.
2. If you go by metro, walk along the main road and do not think that going straight across the gardens will be shorter. While the school is far from the main road, the entrance is almost a beeline from the Metro station along the road.

My visit to the School of Aristotle started with a stroll along a path through a beautiful garden that connects the entrance of the site to the actual location of the archeological site.

This historic site served as a hub of intellectual inquiry, where the great Aristotle imparted his wisdom to his students. While I did look out to see any connection with Plato or Socrates, I didn't see any. I guess that would be because their own schools must have been in different locations.

Opting for a longer route, I thoroughly explored the area, going all the way around the ruins, immersing myself in its rich history.

The School of Aristotle holds immense significance in the development of education and the pursuit of knowledge. The site has diverse inscriptions scattered throughout, explaining the parts of the ruins and what must have been a functional educational facility.

One of these was the ancient gymnasium, which showed the emphasis on the combination of physical exercise and mental education, and it must have been a pivotal part of the school.

The school was built out of simple materials like mud and stones, although some areas have undergone recent renovations with cemented walls.

In all, it is a good place to visit, especially if you have known of Aristotle or ancient greek philosophy.
Written September 22, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

monia71
Treviso, Italy2,478 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2019 • Family
This place will require a short time of visit but you will appreciate the atmosphere and the calmness. It is where Aristotele from 343 before christ for two years taught Alexander the great... Beside there is a little but interesting culture center where visitors can have a coffee and buy some souvenir. The culture center is closed on weekends but they will leave the door open so as to allow visitors to use toylets. So simple place but that deserve a visit. It is located approximately 110 km from Thessaloniki. If you need to reach and you have a navigation system as follows the grids: 40.629857 N 22.099108 E or 40 37' 47,48"N
22 05' 56.78". The road to reach is good and asphalted and there is a big paved parking area. Place very nice to be visited in spring time. Highly recommended
Written March 10, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dirk W
Alexandra Headland, Australia10,051 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Couples
For me it was a surrealistic experience to stand on the spot where Aristotle taught the boy Alexander the Great and his close friends between 343 and 340 BCE. For some years now I have traveled the world following Alexander's incredible campaign. But this spot is the beginning of it all ; this is where the seeds of greatness were planted by the greatest thinker of his (of all ?) time.
The site is a little underwhelming : it is at the end of an overgrown path and there is nothing much substantial or visual - so it is more an emotional journey to come here. As an attraction for the average tourist it fails totally in its current format ; with some more excavations, cleaning up, better informative signage and probably a little reconstruction, it could be a major drawing card.
As for me, I was satisfied to spend some time just sitting around, soak up the energy and letting my imagination run free.
Written July 12, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jeff G
Washington DC, DC106 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2019
We were very intrigued to visit this location. We did during a closed period and got to walk the grounds. They are interesting but not a lot to share. We were not able to see the museum, so can not comment
Written August 8, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Melany W
57 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2017 • Couples
It is an overwhelming experience to sit in the place where Alexander sat, as a student to Aristotle. Seeing the short videos inside the center was a really good idea before walking the site to get the information to make the experience richer and more meaningful. The advice of the person working there to drive to the Tombs of Anthimia and the Judgement was the best advice - these two tombs are so well preserved, are 100 years older then Vergina, and are truly amazing.
Written October 8, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

COJOWisconsin
Germantown, WI716 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
There is nothing to really see here. Some minor remnants and caves but really neglected. And a lot of stray dogs. Some signage to read but hard to believe this is what they say it was. It really isn’t close to any other history sights- 50 minutes from the waterfalls in Edessa and 45 minutes from the Tomb of King Philip II.
Written October 3, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Lin D
Royston, UK530 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Couples
A strange place because the infrastructure is there for many visitors, eg a huge car park but the site seems neglected! No one was there! There are pathways up to an area of rock with caves and a large and helpful information board in English and Greek. The setting is lovely but you really have to use your imagination and feel that really something special did happen here around 340BC when Aristotle tutored Alexander the Great for two years until he was 16!
Written June 21, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jenny Jocker10
Naousa, Greece8 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Friends
stunning and not far from thessaloniki city
you are so close to naousa city and edessa city you can make a small tour between veria naousa Edessa
Written June 16, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

_dmpmvp
Athens, Greece7 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019
We did not know that it existed (our hotelier suggested it). Due to bank holiday it was closed but we contacted the person responsible who not only opened it for us (we were 3 families -11people) but more importantly guided us through history with the passion of a gig who really loves what he is doing, open the amphitheater for us to see relevant video’s & gave us vip treatment! The ancient city of Mieza where the school of Aristotle is located is an unknown place (living in the “shadow” of ancient Pella & Vergina) well worth visiting
Written May 2, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ioannis V
London, UK124 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2018 • Family
I have visited many times since I was a kid, its a place of great historical significance, to know that where you stand once stood Aristotle and Alexander the Great. Beautiful and very interesting landscape too.
Written December 26, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 20
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

School of Aristotle, Naousa

All things to do in NaousaThings to do near School of Aristotle
RestaurantsFlightsTravel StoriesCruisesRental Cars