Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak
Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak
3.5
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


3.5
3.5 of 5 bubbles224 reviews
Excellent
67
Very good
69
Average
47
Poor
22
Terrible
19

dgjohansson
Ronneby, Sweden1,619 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2023 • Couples
Yes it's a copy but since you can't see the original (too fragile) this will have to do in order to get a picture about what the grqaves of the Thracian Valley of the Kings looks like. It's a worth substitute and should be included in a visit to the Thracian tombs. Bring cash since car payment can be non functional and it is far to the closes ATM.
Written January 1, 2024
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

The Flying Spaniard
Sofia, Bulgaria2,445 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2020 • Solo
It is a nice place, however if you're archeologist or historian will be much more interesting. Even though it is a copy (the original one is closed to public), it perfectly reflects the old style painting.
Written November 11, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Emira T
Tunis, Tunisia876 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2017 • Couples
The Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak which was discovered in 1944, is listed in the UNESCO World Heritage sites since 1979. The tomb dates from the Hellenistic period, i.e IVth c. BC. It is small quite unique in its architecture and frescoes. The authentic monument is closed to public but a replica of it has been built a 100m away.
Explanations on billboards are provided in French, English, Deutsch, Bulgarian and Russian. The site is opened from 9am to 5pm. It is 6 Lv per adult and 2 Lv for students.
Written May 18, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Georgi G
7 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Family
Does not deserves a star or being a UNESCO heritage.

One can only visit a “copy” of the tomb. No English guide as this country is 50 years behind in every possible way.
And of course, very overpriced.

Complete waste of time and a huge disappointment.
Written September 3, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

thetravelbug2022
Stara Zagora54 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
The Tomb of Seuthus III

Just outside Kazanlak, along the road to the Shipka pass, lies the tomb now thought to belong to Thracian King, Seuthus III.

From the outside the tomb looks little more than a large mole hill covered in grass. In fact all over the flat valley bottom, there are mounds just like this, some large, some tiny, but all similar in appearance and all left over from around the 5th century BC. It is estimated there are around 1,500 such tombs and thus the area has been renamed the Valley of the Thracian Kings. However, only a handful have been excavated and not all the mounds actually contain the stone-built tombs inside.

Little is known about the Thracian culture, although the opening and exploration of a few of these tombs has revealed various treasures from which assumptions can be made. The tomb of Seuthus III was excavated in September 2004.

Now, the tomb can be reached by a brand new tarmac road, leading to car park by the side of the large mound. On the south side of the mound, an opening has been dug into the side and new glass doors enclose a foyer where pamphlets in both Bulgarian and English can be purchased and where you pay 3 leva per person to enter the tomb itself and have your own guide in English (and other languages).

Right in the doorway to the foyer is a large stone. This is the spot where a bronze head of a bearded man was discovered. It had been snapped off a statue and lay propped up by stones at the entrance to the tomb. A replica is now there.

From the tomb’s ‘foyer’ a corridor runs for around 13 metres into the centre of the mound where three rooms were found. This corridor had been filled with stones and soil when it was originally found but the roof and walls, which are made of huge square carved granite blocks, show that at some point, a fire had raged through the corridor, blackening the walls and ceiling. It is thought that maybe the wooden support structures where set alight when the tomb was closed.

At the end of this corridor is a small rectangular room with a sloping ceiling. The skeleton of a horse was found this chamber and it is believed that the animal was sacrificed so as to accompany its owner to the next life. In other burial mounds, the skeletons of large dogs have been found and in some, the bodies of young females, possibly wives of the tomb’s owner as it is thought that it may have been an honour to die and be buried with your husband.

The chamber above leads into a small round room with an impressive domed ceiling and through this you enter the burial chamber. This room appears to have been carved out of one enormous block of stone, with a bed or table, carved into the far wall. It was in here that the body of King Seuthus III was found, along with many golden treasures, including a golden wreath and a cup and many other exquisite ornaments. A richly woven cloth covered the floor and the bed. The tomb owner was identified by inscriptions found on some of the items in the tomb. King Seuthus III had built his city, called Seuthopolis not far from the tomb but unfortunately it now lies at the bottom of a large reservoir.

Many of the treasures found are now on display in the museum in Kazanlak. Other tombs are slowly being excavated and a number are to be linked by a tarmac road or trail, leading from one to the other. For any one interested in ancient history and culture, you should make the effort to visit one or two of these Thracian burial mounds that populate the area around Kazanlak. Other tombs are found in various locations around Bulgaria.

Rachel Gawith
Written March 13, 2008
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Neverborn Before
Bulgaria395 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2019 • Family
İt is really interesting and nice to go, however if you go to this place without any information and idea where you are going you may get bored or unhappy. İt is really small place, a lot to say and a lot to show, but you need to know how to read the signs, what is this, from where is coming and all other general info that you can find in the web. There is an entrance fee around 3 euro, you can take pictures and you can buy some souvenirs. There is parking place close, but you need to walk a bit after. İt is good for young and teens and all ages :)
Written August 31, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

DoctorJoeE
North Caldwell, NJ464 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Couples
As others have pointed out, this is a replica -- and since the original tomb isn't open to the public, we must take their word for it that this is an *accurate* replica. A far better use of your time, in my opinion, is to drive a few miles down the road to Shipka, where a number of actual Thracian tombs are open to the public. Do that instead.
Written July 4, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Floorball7
Brussels, Belgium4 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2018 • Friends
We had to pay a considerable amount to enter this “Tomb site”, at least if you can call it like that... It appeared to be an absolute typical tourist scam, a small place of 4m2 is really not worth to pay any entrance fee, better use your 6 Lev for a pint of beer. You have been warned! 😉
Written July 12, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

saronic
Zurich, Switzerland26,281 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2017 • Solo
Bulgaria's famous Rose Valley covers also most of the 'Valley of Thracian Kings'. Several tumuli can be seen, when driving through, all spread out in the fields. Here several Thracian rulers had been buried, in the surroundings of Seuthopolis, the capital of the so-called Odrysian Kingdom.

The most famous of these tombs - due to its well preserved frescoes from the early Hellenistic period (4th c. AD) - is the one found by accident during WW II near the modern town of Kazanlak. Because the wall paintings are susceptible to humidity, for example from human breath, the whole tomb was closed for visitors (except for the occasional scientist) and a copy of the whole tomb and its decoration had been constructed nearby.

It is not possible to judge the quality of the copied paintings without knowing the original, but for me they were satisfying and I enjoyed the visit. Luckily I was alone, when there in mid-September, because the place is small - for maximum 4 persons at a time.

Through a narrow corridor, also with paintings, one comes to the domed main chamber with superbly executed frescoes of horses and humans. No wonder that the 'Thracian Tomb of Kazanlak' became one of the first places worldwide to be declared as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1979.

The copy of the tomb is open daily between 9am to 5.30pm. Entrance fee is 6 BGN. There is a good little brochure available - in Bulgarian, English and German. Photography without flash is allowed.
Written December 13, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Suwatss
Bangkok, Thailand5,254 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2019 • Couples
This copy tomb of Thracian king may not be a must anymore for your visit to Bulgaria given it is a copy to replace the now-closed actual tomb just a few meters away. We anyway made decision to see and we felt disappointed for the cramp small tomb but colorful (though fake anyway). Beware of a long line since each time the tomb can accommodate only four persons at a time.
Written June 2, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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