Piedras Negras
Piedras Negras
5
What people are saying
Phil E
By Phil E
not for the faint of heart
5.0 of 5 bubblesFeb 2015
We accessed this site from Frontera Corozal, Mexico - by taking a 4 hour boat ride down the Usumacinta River (which is the border between Mexico & Guatemala). It should be noted that it's closer to a six hour ride back (against the current). This includes two stretches of rapids (where we had to stop and bail the water out the boats). The majority of the ride is through high-canopy jungle, with exotic birds, howler monkeys and crocodiles along the banks. Happily, as it had rained the night before, we were able to seen fresh jaguar tracks along the banks. The site is on a bend in the river, on a bluff far above it. There is no dock or landing, you beach the boat, and climb a high sand dune to the site. The site is not 'improved', there are no facilities - so you are in the jungle for the walk through the site. This site had it's height in the late classic period, and is historically very significant. The site is known for it's sweat-bath and great sculptures. It should also be noted that we also saw a boat reliably identified as human traffickers taking young women and children down river at dusk (while we were on our way back). I feel that it's important to note that we took this trip only with the assistance and guidance of two local Archaeologists, who had not only been there previously, but who also have strong and ongoing connections with the local peoples (note that I did not say local "authorities" or "governments"). Although this was a great experience, it is probably not a trip that you want to attempt on your own!

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5.0
5.0 of 5 bubbles6 reviews
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Greg V
Alabama927 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2010 • Solo
There's basically 2 ways to get to the site. One is by lancha from Frontera Corozal in Mexico and the other is by horse from the Guatemala side of the border. I've only went there once by lancha. The site is nice to visit but does not have a lot of standing structures to see. One thing there which is extremely nice to see is the grave cap stone of Tatiana Proskuriokoff. I recommend this site to anyone who is willing to go through the effort for going there.
Written November 16, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Phil E
Minnesota980 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2015 • Friends
We accessed this site from Frontera Corozal, Mexico - by taking a 4 hour boat ride down the Usumacinta River (which is the border between Mexico & Guatemala). It should be noted that it's closer to a six hour ride back (against the current). This includes two stretches of rapids (where we had to stop and bail the water out the boats). The majority of the ride is through high-canopy jungle, with exotic birds, howler monkeys and crocodiles along the banks. Happily, as it had rained the night before, we were able to seen fresh jaguar tracks along the banks.
The site is on a bend in the river, on a bluff far above it. There is no dock or landing, you beach the boat, and climb a high sand dune to the site.
The site is not 'improved', there are no facilities - so you are in the jungle for the walk through the site.
This site had it's height in the late classic period, and is historically very significant. The site is known for it's sweat-bath and great sculptures.
It should also be noted that we also saw a boat reliably identified as human traffickers taking young women and children down river at dusk (while we were on our way back).
I feel that it's important to note that we took this trip only with the assistance and guidance of two local Archaeologists, who had not only been there previously, but who also have strong and ongoing connections with the local peoples (note that I did not say local "authorities" or "governments").
Although this was a great experience, it is probably not a trip that you want to attempt on your own!
Written February 21, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

haohuangpianist
Claremont, CA239 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2017 • Couples
Incredibly dense rain forest that has swallowed up a major Mayan city that was a rival to Yaxilan and others for the Uscaminta River trade route. Romantic, spectacular vistas, dark brooding ruins, well worth the 4 hour trip each way from the Mexican border. On the way we saw lots of jungle wildlife including howler monkeys, crocodiles, many different kinds of birds. Felt like a real jungle adventure!
Written February 4, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
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