KarLag / Museum of Political Repression Victims’ Memory of the Dolinka Settlement

KarLag / Museum of Political Repression Victims’ Memory of the Dolinka Settlement

KarLag / Museum of Political Repression Victims’ Memory of the Dolinka Settlement
4.5
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4.5
71 reviews
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Ana-Maria B
Cluj-Napoca, Romania1,251 contributions
Aug 2022
Really well made museum. It manages to convey both information and emotion. It does not feel kitschy or preachy and is quite accessible even if you only speak Russian.
We got there by taxi. We paid for the tickets and received an English speaking guide. Do take your photos during the guided trip, you cannot explore without being accompanied by a guide. The exhibits themselves are impactful and tell about different aspects of what happened. Some of them are quite effective.
Unfortunately, there are no books for sale about the topic but maybe that change sin the future.
To return, we took a bus near the museum. And then another one. People were very helpful.
If you go to Karaganda, do check this one out.
Written September 6, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

VShuptar
Karaganda, Kazakhstan27 contributions
Aug 2015 • Friends
The Museum of memory of political repressions victims is located in a monumental two-storey building with columns, where Administration of the Karaganda corrective labour camp of the People’s commissariat of internal affairs had been housed until 1959.
Written September 3, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Scott B
Salt Lake City, Utah82 contributions
Jun 2015 • Family
Our family visited this museum in June 2015. We have a 14 year old son who we adopted from an orphanage in Karaganda when he was two. We decided to visit Karaganda together with our son's older brother so that we could learn more about our son's heritage and roots. It is likely that some of his ancestors came to the area through the Karlag.

This was an excellent museum. It gave important information about the Soviet "Gulag" system. They were many educational displays. There is no doubt about it, it is hard to see. Despite that, everyone should see it! It was appropriate for our teenagers, but may be challenging for some children at that age.

Our guide spoke English. She was a little nervous at first, but she got much better as we went along. She knew enough to answer questions that were off the script.

More people need to educate themselves about the abuses of Stalin.
Written June 21, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Burdenkov
Minsk, Belarus115 contributions
Oct 2014 • Business
Such places should be promoted in a more active way so people remember the atrocities of the regime against its own people!
Written November 12, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

carolinne2014-0
Karaganda, Kazakhstan5 contributions
Mar 2017 • Friends
Visiting Dolinka which was the headquarters of the Karlag, is an essential part of understanding the people and culture of Kazakhstan. It is a very sobering experience and exhibits repression in many forms. The history of the time period covered is brutal and is well covered. I would have really liked an English copy of the book which was available in Russian and Kazakh. Good to visit in Winter to give a good idea of some of the conditions faced. Also, a must, visit the site of the mass graves which is on the main road. If possible, this is even more haunting and depressing than the museum.
Written March 13, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ken H
Australia103 contributions
Apr 2016 • Business
A very eye opening exhibition of some harder times in Kazakhstan history. All displays had Kazakh, Russian and English descriptions. English guides can be arranged with prior notice. As they did not have a guide for me (we just dropped in) they let me photograph inside for free. Normally a small fee.
Written August 10, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

GLBonora
Ferrara, Italy105 contributions
May 2015 • Friends
In the 1940s nearly 70% of the population of Karaganda were Germans, descendents of the Volga Germans who on Stalin’s orders were deported to Siberia and central Kazakhstan when Hitler invaded Poland, and were interned in hard labor camps entirely on the basis of their origins. Karaganda was the site of one of the principal gulags of the Stalinist era. KarLag (all the hard-labor camps in the area around Karaganda) was set up in order to furnish the Karaganda area’s many coal mines with a workforce composed of prisoners. All Volga German scholars and scientists were interned. What ensued was a rebellion against the intellectual death of penal labor in the mines. With the few resources at their command, the prisoners managed to hold concerts and put on plays to celebrate holidays. There was even a KarLag ballet company. Many of the scholars who were deported here stayed on in Karaganda even after the gulag was closed in 1959, making a significant contribution to the city’s cultural growth in the 1960s and 1970s.
Written September 2, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mira S
14 contributions
Aug 2015 • Friends
You have gotta visit this place. It is creep because it makes you realize the atrocities people had to go through. A really depressing place. Get ready to get drunk after visiting it.
Written August 28, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MaratSagimbaev
Karaganda, Kazakhstan20 contributions
Aug 2014 • Business
Most interesting historical place to visit in Karaganda region. It was a capital of KarLag- part of Gulag system.I want to add to previous posts that most of inhabitants of Dolinka village are descendants of Karlag employees and victims of Karlag as well.
Written July 8, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MBrown
Laramie, WY20 contributions
May 2014 • Business
I was visiting Karaganda for business and had an opportunity to visit this museum. My grandfather was Volga German and immigrated to the US in about 1912 from the Saratov region of Russia. The Volga Germans were among the first interned at Karlag, but no family names were found among those interred there. This was a powerful experience. The museum has artifacts from the time period, but has displays that give you a sense for what it was like. You can read the heartfelt letters of prisoners who did not understand why they were there "as loyal Soviets." For me the most powerful part of the exhibit was the room of art produced by prisoners. Much of it was the same art produced anywhere, but some, with names like "not expected home," or "road to hell," are powerful testaments by those who were there. Great museum and well worth the visit.
Written November 6, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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KarLag / Museum of Political Repression Victims’ Memory of the Dolinka Settlement - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (with Photos)

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