Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Atomic Museum

Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Atomic Museum, Arco: Address, Phone Number, Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Atomic Museum Reviews: 4.5/5

Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Atomic Museum

Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Atomic Museum
4.5
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.5
226 reviews
Excellent
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Very good
56
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OnlinePhotographer
Coeur d'Alene, ID31 contributions
Oct 2015 • Family
Would you believe we (the USA) almost had an ATOMIC AIRPLANE at one time? The large equipment to the left of the white building (not seen in the photo at time of this review) is claimed to be an Atomic Engine for an Airplane. Dr. Who fans take note!
Written October 13, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Dave E
Cathedral City, CA483 contributions
Jun 2014 • Solo
There is not much to see in Arco, but if you are driving through this is worth the stop. Arco was the first town "atomic powered" town and the history is well presented at the museum. You can wait for a tour or walk yourself through and they do provide a nice opportunity to explore after the tour.
It is open daily - but ONLY Memorial Day to Labor Day
Written October 4, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Seaside787364
Mount Pleasant, MI7 contributions
Aug 2018 • Couples
We stopped randomly to stretch our legs. It was amazing if you enjoy history. We took a self-guided free tour. You get to see the entire reactor facility and it had kid-friendly activities too. It had a slightly strange vibe but I think it’s because I’m not used to being around former nuclear reactors. It was so great and you should stop! (30-60 minute stop)
Written August 14, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Anon Y
1 contribution
May 2016 • Family
I'm wondering how to phrase this without offending anyone. There are a number of reviews that contain incorrect information. I'm sure they are well meaning and hope they will take my comment the same way.

The EBR-1 will appeal to a wide cross section of people. It is very technical, definitely historic (first electricity produce by Atomic energy), educational and very rare. Rare in the sense that very few decommissioned nuclear sites are open to public inspection.

One review suggested that much of the original facility is now gone. This is most definitely not the case the entire facility with offices, reactor, control rooms, robotic manipulator hot cell, and much more is completely preserved. And unlike most museums I think I remember a sign in the control room the said DO TOUCH.

Another review said they were dissuaded from viewing the site by warning signs related to Hanta Virus on the guard shack (not part of the tour) and radiation warnings.

I did ask about the Hanta virus sign and the explanation was that buildings that are closed or abandoned can become homes to feral rodents and other contaminated animals so the sign. I was assured that the occupied buildings and spaces are properly pest controlled.

There is also little threat from radiation. In an abundance of caution the site is still monitored but the student guides that work there receive less radiation from the facility during the summer season than a pilot (or you) would receive on a single transcontinental flight.

The Guides were great but their technical knowledge varied from person to person. It woulds be accurate to say they are better with the history than the science.
Written August 19, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

copperdragon66
Pittsburgh, PA660 contributions
Jul 2014 • Family
As someone who has worked in the nuclear industry, this site was a must see for me. I was not disappointed. Seeing how a nuclear plant was operated at the dawn of the industry was fascinating and educational.

We arrived at 4:20 in the afternoon, and the site is only open until 5pm in the summer months only (memorial-labor day). Due to our arrival time, we could only take the self guided tour. This is still quite encompassing and covers everything from how nuclear fission works to how it is controlled and how it is used to make electricity.

I got mixed reviews from the teens. They liked the secret cubbyholes in the museum even if they didn't fully appreciate the significance of each location. They also liked the hands on displays - there was an area where they could try to use remote manipulators to pick up small objects and another area which was a mock up of a real control room - visitors can try to get the plant running and generating electricity.

Depending on your level of interest you can spend 1-2 hours visiting, and the staff are friendly, accessible and outstanding. And it's free too!
Written October 26, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Oimaronap
Boulder, CO35 contributions
Jul 2011 • Solo
This museum is great. It is located in the actual EBR-1 reactor building and is very interactive. There are very few places in the building that are off-limits. The museum is free to visit and can be toured in an hour or so. Very cool place!
Written July 13, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Andy F
San Jose, CA70 contributions
Jun 2019 • Couples
A great little historic site where you can actually see how a nuclear reactor works, and how the parts go together. This site has great historical significance because it's one of the first reactors in the world to generate electricity, and the first reactor in the world to prove the feasibility of breeding plutonium nuclear fuel.

It's relatively small, and it's free to enter. It may take you about 30 minutes to walk through the self-guided tour, we're about 45 minutes for the guided tour.
Written June 27, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

morrikb
Colorado Springs, CO84 contributions
Aug 2017 • Couples
What an experience...in the middle of desolate southern Idaho! My husband was in geek heaven, (having studied nuclear physics in college), and I learned so much, as we toured and wandered around this amazing facility. Idaho has the BEST roadside signs, at rest stops, and pull offs. We read about the EBR I at a rest stop, and decided we HAD to stop and check it out. It's easy to find, has unique displays outside the main facility, is uncrowded, and is such an integral part of US history, it's a must see! I had no idea how nuclear reactors were "invented." This historical site gives you the detailed history of how nuclear reactors began, how they provided electricity for a nearby town, and how even though the scientists did all the complex math for reactions, they had to rely on nearby farmers and ranchers to help them devise containers and robot arms, and all sorts of mechanical devices. We were fascinated by all we saw and learned at EBR I, and spent over three hours there...but it felt like an hour! Interesting that adjacent to the big EBR sign, there is an old fashioned plow...made us wonder...from plowshares to ............!?!
Written October 2, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

tunic d
Seattle, WA5 contributions
Jun 2013 • Solo
cool.you ever seen a nuclear reactor? Ever wonder how electricity is generated from nuclear energy? Satisfy your curiosity by visiting the Experimental Breeder Reactor No. 1 (EBR-I) Atomic Museum, located on U.S. Highway 20/26 between Idaho Falls and Arco (see map). The facility, a National Historic Landmark where usable electricity was first generated from nuclear energy in 1951, is open to the public from Memorial Day weekend through Labor Day weekend — seven days a week — from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free. It’s the only place in America you can see four nuclear reactors — including two aircraft nuclear propulsion prototypes, a reactor control room, remote handling devices for radioactive materials, radiation detection equipment, and much more. New in 2011 are colorful, interactive displays that tell the story of EBR-I’s sibling - See more at: http://www.inl.gov/ebr/#sthash.Dbbg5ERN.dpuf
Written June 13, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Chukdzl
Mountain Home, Idaho12 contributions
Aug 2011 • Solo
A must see! To know the very power we used today was born in this building. Totally cool self guided tour. There are tour guide(s) in the building if you have any questions. There are also 2 ea nuclear jet engines outside that were built to power a large bomber which they say was never built.
Written August 7, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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