The Double Play Bar and Grill

The Double Play Bar and Grill, San Francisco: Hours, Address, The Double Play Bar and Grill Reviews: 3/5

The Double Play Bar and Grill

The Double Play Bar and Grill
3
Bars & Clubs
This location was reported permanently closed
What people are saying
carol p
By carol p
THE BIRTHPLACE OF THE GIANTS
Apr 2015
In San Francisco we are justly proud of AT&T Park, the jewel of a baseball park where our beloved San Francisco Giants perform their heroic deeds. But I also like to take the real baseball fans to The Double Play Bar, filled as it is with baseball memorabilia that celebrates the coming of the Giants to San Francisco. Here’s the story of their arrival as told in Why Is That Bridge Orange? San Francisco for the Curious. This sign that fronts the Double Play bar at 16th and Bryant Streets is the only reminder of the storied beginnings of the San Francisco Giants that in 1958 moved into Seals Stadium across the street. The stadium with its 2600 bleacher seats was appropriately described by sportscaster Russ Hodges as that "beautiful little watch charm of a ball park." Now the site of a shopping center, the stadium had been home to the legendary San Francisco Seals. Old time residents will remember the excitement when New York Giants owner Horace Stoneham brought his losing team to San Francisco in 1958. The on-again-off- again club had finished 6th in New York two years in a row. Its home field, The Polo Grounds, was about to be demolished, and attendance at the park was half what it used to be. Spurred on by the news that Brooklyn Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley would be moving his team to Los Angeles, then San Francisco Mayor George Christopher goaded Stoneham into bringing his team to the 18,600 stadium where the Seals had performed before adoring fans. It was as a San Francisco Seal that the young Joe DiMaggio perfected his craft, in 1932 hitting successfully in 62 straight games for the Pacific Coast League team. Arriving in town with one superstar, the already legendary Willie Mays, the Giants began beefing up with the players fans still celebrate today: Orlando Cepeda, Willie McCovey, and, pitcher Joan Marichal, he of the high leg kick and intimidating delivery. By 1962, after moving into the now much demeaned but then celebrated Candlestick Park, the Giants were ready to play serious ball. That year, with seven games to play, the team was behind the Dodgers, four games out of first place. But by seasons end they had pulled even with LA and then proceeded to defeat the despised Southlanders in a three game playoff series. And it was on to the World Series. That Series against the Yankees is remembered by fans for what might have been. It came down to a tiebreaking game seven, a pitchers' duel in which the Dodgers were up 1- 0 when the Giants came to bat in the bottom of the ninth. With two outs, Mays was on second with McCovey at bat. A hard line drive -- a sure hit off pitcher Ralph Terry -- brought the fans to their feet. Terry threw down his glove in disgust. But second baseman Bobby Richardson had moved out of position chasing a previous McCovey foul ball and was at the wrong place at the right time. Richardson snagged the ball, robbing McCovey of the game changing hit, giving the Yankees the series. The mourning began. In December of 1962 Peanuts creator and Giant's fan Charles Schultz had Linus and Charlie Brown sitting on a porch looking glum for three panels. In the fourth Charlie reaches toward the heavens. “Why couldn’t McCovey have hit the ball just three feet higher?” he laments. Unfortunately, Charlie Brown wasn't around to see his heroes redeemed with World Series victories in 2010 and 2012.

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The area
Address
Neighborhood: Mission District
From burritos to bicyclists, the Mission is the foundation for all things hip in the city. Cultural attractions, an independent arts community, sumptuous street murals and a high density of bars and cafes make this neighborhood a magnet for young people. While terrific inexpensive food is abundant, its top-of-the-line restaurants now compete with the city’s best for fashionable diners. Indulge as the locals do by heading to Mission Dolores Park, buy some ice cream, and savor one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the country.

3.0
2 reviews
Excellent
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Terrible
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mike r
24 contributions
May 2016 • Solo
just close the doors and walk away!!!!

ridiculous bartenders...tattoos and
GROSSLY OVERWEIGHT yet sporting cut off shorts and a tight shirt.

can't imagine there's enough alcohol in the place to make her appear attractive, she's sezy. ..place is a ghost town

n9 food at night, they can't wait to close up

DIVE...DIVING ........

JUST DROWN AND GET IT OVER WITH.
Written May 8, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

carol p
San Francisco, CA54 contributions
Apr 2015 • Friends
In San Francisco we are justly proud of AT&T Park, the jewel of a baseball park where our beloved San Francisco Giants perform their heroic deeds. But I also like to take the real baseball fans to The Double Play Bar, filled as it is with baseball memorabilia that celebrates the coming of the Giants to San Francisco. Here’s the story of their arrival as told in Why Is That Bridge Orange? San Francisco for the Curious.

This sign that fronts the Double Play bar at 16th and Bryant Streets is the only reminder of the storied beginnings of the San Francisco Giants that in 1958 moved into Seals Stadium across the street. The stadium with its 2600 bleacher seats was appropriately described by sportscaster Russ Hodges as that "beautiful little watch charm of a ball park." Now the site of a shopping center, the stadium had been home to the legendary San Francisco Seals. Old time residents will remember the excitement when New York Giants owner Horace Stoneham brought his losing team to San Francisco in 1958. The on-again-off- again club had finished 6th in New York two years in a row. Its home field, The Polo Grounds, was about to be demolished, and attendance at the park was half what it used to be.

Spurred on by the news that Brooklyn Dodgers owner Walter O'Malley would be moving his team to Los Angeles, then San Francisco Mayor George Christopher goaded Stoneham into bringing his team to the 18,600 stadium where the Seals had performed before adoring fans. It was as a San Francisco Seal that the young Joe DiMaggio perfected his craft, in 1932 hitting successfully in 62 straight games for the Pacific Coast League team.

Arriving in town with one superstar, the already legendary Willie Mays, the Giants began beefing up with the players fans still celebrate today: Orlando Cepeda, Willie McCovey, and, pitcher Joan Marichal, he of the high leg kick and intimidating delivery.

By 1962, after moving into the now much demeaned but then celebrated Candlestick Park, the Giants were ready to play serious ball. That year, with seven games to play, the team was behind the Dodgers, four games out of first place. But by seasons end they had pulled even with LA and then proceeded to defeat the despised Southlanders in a three game playoff series. And it was on to the World Series.

That Series against the Yankees is remembered by fans for what might have been. It came down to a tiebreaking game seven, a pitchers' duel in which the Dodgers were up 1- 0 when the Giants came to bat in the bottom of the ninth. With two outs, Mays was on second with McCovey at bat. A hard line drive -- a sure hit off pitcher Ralph Terry -- brought the fans to their feet. Terry threw down his glove in disgust. But second baseman Bobby Richardson had moved out of position chasing a previous McCovey foul ball and was at the wrong place at the right time. Richardson snagged the ball, robbing McCovey of the game changing hit, giving the Yankees the series.

The mourning began. In December of 1962 Peanuts creator and Giant's fan Charles Schultz had Linus and Charlie Brown sitting on a porch looking glum for three panels. In the fourth Charlie reaches toward the heavens. “Why couldn’t McCovey have hit the ball just three feet higher?” he laments. Unfortunately, Charlie Brown wasn't around to see his heroes redeemed with World Series victories in 2010 and 2012.
Written June 2, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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