We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The Tripadvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Historic Sandusky

25 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.

Historic Sandusky

25 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
25Reviews1Q&A
Traveler rating
  • 15
  • 8
  • 2
  • 0
  • 0
Traveler type
Time of year
Language
Selected filters
  • Filter
  • English
Taylor B wrote a review Aug 2018
Chicago, Illinois6,568 contributions5,325 helpful votes
En route from Appomattox to Lexington, Virginia, my wife and I were persuaded to visit the Sandusky House in Lynchburg. Because we are always fascinated by old houses of Revolutionary War or Civil War vintage, we had to make an unanticipated stop. We're glad we did. Although some parts of the house are being restored, there is enough to see in the house and museum to warrant a visit. A formal two-story, brick I-shaped house, it was built in 1808 by Charles Johnston. It is one of the earliest homes in Virginia's Piedmont region to display the architectural details and refinements characteristic of Federal design. In 1817, Johnston hosted neighbor Thomas Jefferson of Poplar Forest for dinner. Johnston named his home Sandusky after the place in Ohio where he was captured by Shawnee Indians and barely escaped with his life. In 1864, during the battle of Lynchburg in the Civil War, Sandusky served as Union headquarters and a barn was utilized as a field hospital. More than 100 wounded and dying Union soldiers were left there following the battle. To this day, the parlor room is stained with blood. Among those quartered in the house were General David Hunter and future Presidents Rutherford B. Hayes and William McKinley, who served on Hunter's staff. Other buildings on the property include two 20th century tenant houses, one frame and one brick. An excellent guided tour and an 18-minute documentary help to tell the story. Sandusky was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1982.
Read more
Date of experience: July 2018
1 Helpful vote
Helpful
Share
Jack L wrote a review Jan 2018
East Syracuse, New York719 contributions539 helpful votes
Sandusky is compose of two structures: a mansion & visitor center/museum. The mansion was built in 1808 by Charles Johnson. The mansion went through three owners before the civil war. During the Battle of Lynchburg, June 17-18, 1864, Sandusky was occupied by Union Gen. David Hunter with two staff officers that became US presidents-Rutherford Hayes & William McKinley. Also the mansion was used as an union hospital. In 2000 the last Hunter owner sold Sandusky to the Historic Sandusky Foundation to preserve & interpret Sandusky's history. My tour guide was Kelly. Since I was the only visitor, she was able to take her time, detailing the mansion's history, all family members & owners. Only half of the first floor is available for viewing, with all rooms getting the detail treatment. The tour lasted about 40 minutes, what a group tour would last I have no idea. The mansion is red brick, with the surrounding grounds with surrounding grounds well taken care of. On the grounds are two info stands-Sandusky's Headquarters & Lynchburg ' Early & Hunter'. The museum is small only one large room. Here are a few weapons, about a field hospital during the Battle of Lynchburg, civil war medicine, 'Lynchburg Citizen Soldier's. A complete museum visit probably will last 30 minutes at most if a visitor takes the time to view & read all. I was more interested in the museum before arriving than the mansion, however Kelly's detailed tour changed my thinking. She was able to answer all questions. There might be only two or three original mansion items, all the rest are time period, close the mansion's early period. Photography is allowed, however NO flash. The upstairs is currently under restoration. Any person with an interest in early & mid-1800's life style, furniture & architecture would enjoy a visit. Even with only a 40 minute mansion tour & a 25 museum visit-my museum stop lasted about 45 minutes-a tour of both is recommended.
Read more
Date of experience: September 2017
1 Helpful vote
Helpful
Share
Susanne N wrote a review Sep 2017
Columbia, South Carolina74 contributions25 helpful votes
Eighteen minute documentary very nice. Not much to see in the museum. Did not tour the house. Still working on the site.
Read more
Date of experience: September 2017
Helpful
Share
JohnBCowgill wrote a review Aug 2017
Washington DC, District of Columbia796 contributions244 helpful votes
It is a small site, but it had great significance. It is undergoing renovations, but the tour is still good, and the museum tells much as well.
Read more
Date of experience: August 2017
Helpful
Share
Ben S wrote a review Jun 2017
Louisville, Kentucky622 contributions248 helpful votes
+1
Realize before you go that the house only has a couple of rooms that are done. The upstairs is not open to the public and about half the downstairs is not restored. That said, there's a great visitor's center with displays and a wonderful video to see. The cost is minor. Go see it!
Read more
Date of experience: June 2017
Helpful
Share
Previous
Frequently Asked Questions about Historic Sandusky