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Castle House Castle Street, Haverfordwest SA61 2EF Wales
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North Pembrokeshire Tour
Day Trips

North Pembrokeshire Tour

Departing from Tenby, our Land Rover will take you north through the spectacular Preseli Mountains and along the north Pembrokeshire coast towards Britains's smallest city, St. Davids. Highlights of this picturesque tour will include Pentre Ifan Burial Chamber, the Gwaun Valley, Porthgain Harbour and St. David's Cathedral.<br><br>We use the legendary Land Rover Defender 110, equipped with six forward facing seats for added comfort and viewing hight. The vehicle holds a full Private Hire License from Pembrokeshire County Council.
$112.55 per adult
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TeamWard wrote a review Oct 2020
Nottingham, United Kingdom4,291 contributions6,092 helpful votes
Haverfordwest castle is mostly a ruin and wasn't open due to covid or neglect when we visited, it was the 3rd wet castle of the day and they all look horrible places to visit in these conditions.
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Date of experience: August 2020
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darceyhorse wrote a review Aug 2020
Swansea, United Kingdom200 contributions116 helpful votes
We visited during the summer holidays, expecting to find an open attraction as the website does not state otherwise. The castle was accessible but the office/museum was locked with a lady sat at a desk. The disappointment however came from the terrible state of the castle itself. Human and dog waste littered the place, rubbish was strewn everywhere. There were empty alcohol cans and syringes in places too! It was truly not what we were expecting. So much more could be made of this site, especially as there is so much history here. There was no information or any signs outlining any of what must be hundreds of interesting facts associated with the past. They’ve clearly missed a trick here!
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Date of experience: August 2020
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Sarah B wrote a review Nov 2019
112 contributions35 helpful votes
November is not the right time of year to visit this castle apparently. You can walk around for free and stand and stare at the ruined walls but if you want any history or even a bit of information it's in the museum...which is shut. Bit of a shame really.
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Date of experience: November 2019
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Welsh NZers wrote a review Nov 2019
Auckland Central, New Zealand1,024 contributions51 helpful votes
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We walked to the Castle ruins from our Hotel and although they don't have flash signage, they're certainly interesting with the Museum providing more detailed information than the signs outside. This Norman Castle, built by Gilbert de Clare in around 1290 (1st Earl of Pembroke), as it had a natural defensible position. It's had a colourful past with one of its previous owners in the 14th Century being Edward, the Black Prince. Oliver Cromwell ordered the Castle be destroyed in 1648 and was going to imprison the towns people if they didn't demolish it. You can read these letters in the Museum next to the Castle - they were only discovered in 1986. The Pembrokeshire Record Office is located on the site which was originally the Prison. We were very glad we'd included this historic landmark in our itinerary.
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Date of experience: July 2019
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Carol B wrote a review Sep 2019
Birmingham, United Kingdom4,703 contributions672 helpful votes
Saturday 17 August 19, My husband and I decided to go to visit Haverfordwest Castle, situated high on a hill in the centre of the town. Haverfordwest Castle is a stone keep motte and bailey fortress built between 1110 and 1113. The castle was built by Tancred the Fleming, husband, of Gwladus (the aunt of Gerald of Wales). Gilbert de Clare appointed Trancred’s son Richard fitz-Tranced as the custodian The castle was first attacked (unsuccessfully) by Gruffydd AP Rhus, Prince of Deheubarth, between 1135 and 1136. In 1173 the castle had its first royal visit by Henry II of England who passed by the town coming back from a trip to Ireland. In 1188 Gerald of Wales visited the castle with Archbishop Baldwin during his progress around Wales preaching for the 3rd Crusade that Richard the First, the Lion Heart led to the Holy Land. By 1200, many of the original timber buildings had been replaced with the first stone buildings, including a rectangular north eastern tower to serve as the castle's keep. In 1210 King John passed Haverford in order to sail to Ireland to crush a rebellion by the Normans there. In 1213 the King persuaded William Marshal, who had inherited the surrounding Marcher Earldom of Pembroke to garrison the castle in return for an exorbitant sum of money; William Marshall was at this time already extremely wealthy. William Marshal was responsible for replacing most of the original timber walls, towers and gatehouse with stone in the 1210s, and by 1220 little remained of the original castle. Today all that remains of the 1120 establishment is a large square keep in the north-east corner of the inner ward. This reconstruction to strengthen the castle was due to the persistent attacks during this period. In 1217, Llewellyn Fawr (Llewellyn the Great)), Prince of Wales threatened William Marshal and in 1220 he burned the town but failed to take the castle. Following the burning of the town, it was rebuilt greater than before and developed quickly in the 13th century as a commercial centre due to its position and its navel links at the centre of Pembrokeshire. In 1248, Humphrey II de Bohun acquired the castle and resisted an attack in 1257 by Llywelyn AP Gruffudd, Prince of Gwynedd (Llywelyn the Last). In 1265, Haverfordwest castle was taken by William de Valence, Earl of Pembroke, during the Second Baron’s War, but in 1274 royalty intervened and granted it back to the de Bohun family, to the next generation, Humphrey III de Bohun. In 1284 King Edward I and Queen Eleanor of Castile visited the castle for the first time during a royal pilgrimage to St David’s. Eleanor fell in love with the castle. Four years later she borrowed a huge amount of money, from the de Bohun family and loaned £407 to fully rebuild the castle and complete its transition fully into stone. A massive scale re-construction took place, and it was completed a year later in 1290, shortly before she died, the castle then became known as the "Queen's Castle at Haverford". Today much of what remains is dated to Queen Eleanor's 1290 version, including the extensive curtain wall. The castle remained in Royal possession after Eleanor's death and it was granted out to various wealthy tenants. In the 14th century, the castle was occupied by many owners; amongst them was Edward, the Black Prince, from 1359 to 1367. The castle was owned by the crown from 1381to 1385, who paid for restoration works of the castle. These works proved important later, as in 1405 the castle was strong enough to fend off an attack during Owain Glyndwr’s War of Welsh Independence The town walls around the high ground near the castle also did much to protect the castle from invaders, although nothing remains of these town walls today. By the 16th century, however, the castle had become dilapidated and subsequently was re-fortified during the English Civil War. In 1644 Haverfordwest Castle was occupied by the Royalists, but they abandoned it after misinterpreting the noises of cows for a Parliamentary army. It was recaptured and held for the king for a year, who finally surrendered it after the Battle of Colby Moor. Oliver Cromwell sent letters to the castle, ordering it to be destroyed in July 1648 and threatened to imprison the townsfolk unless it was demolished. This derelict medieval castle was then converted to a prison in 1779 My husband and I took lots of photographs of this historic and important castles. If you are a history fan and love castle, then this is one for your bucket list. PLEASE NOTE: There is parking at the castle, but you must get a free parking ticket from the museum, otherwise you run the risk of being clamped and a £ 70 fine.
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Date of experience: August 2019
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