Quin Abbey

Quin Abbey

Historic Sites • Religious Sites
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Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
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4.5
308 reviews
Excellent
206
Very good
83
Average
15
Poor
3
Terrible
1

Bozeman-Dublin
Trim, Ireland8,423 contributions
Feb 2022 • Solo
I thought Quin Abbey or Friary was absolutely beguiling. I couldn't believe my eyes when I pulled up outside it. What a gem.
Only about a 15 minute drive from Ennis, plenty of parking on the street outside and it's completely free to visit.
There is a nice path leading from the road and there are ruins of a small church beside it too
It was a Franciscan Abvey and dates from the 1400,'s however it was built onto a pre existing 12th century castle. The massive central tower still dominates and the cloister is remarkably well preserved. The walls are almost completely intact and though roofless the Abbey is as imposing and beautiful as it must have been in its heyday
A treasure and a must see if you're in the area.
Written February 23, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

rubylass
cork137 contributions
Jul 2020 • Family
Had a lovely visit on a wet day in July. We didn’t know what to expect but are so glad that we visited. Most of it is outdoors but there are some indoor parts where you can shelter from any Irish showers. It’s free to enter and it’s self guided. We loved wandering around and we found it quite safe for the kids. Some parts were under construction and restricted access but well worth stopping for 30mins or more.
Written July 19, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Liz D
Livonia, MI55 contributions
Sep 2021 • Couples
We stayed in Ennis and were looking for old ruins to see in the area. The trip to Quin Abbey was delightful and we would have spent more time in Quin if we had it. The church next door is active so try to avoid visiting at mass time. It’s also fascinating that it is still an active burial ground.
Written September 16, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Ann F
Ballina, Ireland4 contributions
Jul 2014 • Family
On visiting the abbey my children and I were approached by about 5 local youths one with red hair who verbally abused us and made very intimidating actions. When we ignored them and walked away the "m other" who was me was again verbally abused and when I looked them in the eye one pulled down his trousers and showed me his bottom. My daughter was crying at this stage. I was then called a nasty word an,given the finger. When we got to the car I thought the red haired one was going to kick it. Will never visit Quin again. Its a pity cos the Abbey looked lovely.
Written July 25, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Ferdia
County Clare, Ireland8,853 contributions
Set in the quintessential pretty Irish village of Quin is the terrific Quin abbey (in reality the is a friary) - which incorporates a De Clare castle which was built in 1280.

This castle was destroyed in 1286 by the MacNamara clan in revenge for the slaying of a relative, and the remain thick stone walls were incorporated into a church which was constructed by the MacNamara clan in 1330.

The cloisters were added in 1402, the buiding finally completed in the mid 15th century.

The friary was dissolved in 1541 during the reformation, and it passed to the O'Brien clan in 1547.

The friars remained at Quin abbey unofficially until Father Hogan, the last friar, died in 1820. He is buried in the abbey.

These friars lit a beacon each evening to warn travellers passing by the nearby river of Ardsollus - which gained its name from this event - Ardsollus meaning 'high light.'

The abbey is very impressive, on a beautifil setting on the Rine river, and open for visitors free of change from early May until late September, every day but Tuesday. There is an OPW officer at the entrance, and information can be purchased for €3.

There are a number of pubs and restaurants in Quin village, and a visit can be easily incorporated into a stay in either Shannon town or Bunratty village, and really worth the time if you want to visit something missed by most tourists.

The McNamara (Fire ball) tomb should be incorporated into the visit, and of note, this family also built Bunratty castle, Craggaunowen and Knappogue castle.
Written May 11, 2008
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

KeithTynan
Berlin, MA11 contributions
Jul 2014 • Family
A resident of both Ireland and the United States, I've been traveling in the Republic of Ireland for most of my life and have visited most tourist and historic sites in the country. Quin Abbey is a standout in terms of accessibility and preservation. As close as it is to Craggaunowen and the Ennis Friary, it's certainly a "must see", especially with free admission. It is worth noting in advance that this is holy ground with an active cemetery, and proper decorum should be observed by visitors.

The only drawback to this location is the curator, who has been rude to me and my family (including small children) over the years. Why he is still employed there is a mystery. Absent his presence, Quin Abbey rates four stars.
Written July 23, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Chris H
Peterborough, Canada33 contributions
May 2012 • Couples
We hadn't planned on visiting Quin Abbey. I am so glad that we found it. On the advice of the wonderful ladies in the gift shop at Craggaunowen we drove a couple kilometers north to the town of Quin and directly into this wonderful Abbey.

The cloister is beautiful, each of the living areas are in varying levels of ruin, however all of them are accessible. You even have access to the second level, which is quite rare in my experience of ten to twelve abbeys that I've visited in the Republic. The chapel is very well preserved with the altar intact.

If you are interested in visiting Religious Sites or simply want to see the a well preserved ruin in the Ennis area of Clare. Do yourself a favor and take the short drive to Quin.

Cheers from Canada
Written May 20, 2012
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

johnshiel
Wonder Lake, IL14 contributions
Aug 2017 • Solo
My first visit was my best. 1998, August. Solo, first stop off the plane in Shannon. Caretaker (John O'Halloran?) was just finishing mowing an interior micro lawn, and took great pleasure in welcoming me. The Clune clan epicenter is Quin, and my father's mother was a Clune. Her da baptized in Killaloe 1842. Most recent visit was May 2015, a rainy Sunday afternoon. Everything locked and deserted, perfect day for a walkaround! This site could surely use some interpretive attention, quality signage maybe. But historic site "development" could easily degrade the visitor experience. Quin Abbey is so magnificent already, that any info upgrades should become a case study in how to do it right, WITHOUT detracting from or degrading the resource. It can be done, lads and lasses...
Written December 28, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Keith S
Dublin, Ireland13 contributions
Aug 2015 • Business
This is one of the most stunning monastic remains in Ireland and a must see for anyone in the area!

The village of Quin is a fine example of a medieval settlement consisting of an impressive fifteenth-century Franciscan friary built within the remains of an Anglo-Norman castle, a deserted village (now marked by grassy mounds), and across the river Rine a large thirteenth-century parish church dedicated to St Finghin. As the friary is so intact, it allows the visitor to enter the world of medieval Franciscans. The medieval stone high altar remains in its original position, and to the right of this are the very rare remains of an early seventeenth-century stucco crucifixion, on the wall above a tomb. The intimate cloister, the chapter room, kitchen, refectory and dormitories stand almost as they did at the time of the dissolution.

The site is accessible to the public but access to the interior of the structure is limited:

Admission : Free

No Tours

Opening Hours:
April to End of September
Tuesday to Sunday
Closed Mondays
Tue to Fri 10am to 4.30pm
Sat and Sun 9am to 3.30pm

October to early November
Wednesday to Sunday
Closed Mondays and Tuesdays
Wed to Fri 10am to 4.30pm
Sat and Sun 9am to 3.30pm
Gates Closed at least half hour before closing time
Written December 10, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Jim and Leslie
Quaker Hill, CT190 contributions
Oct 2019
We were looking for something to do after landing in Shannon so we decided to stop at Quin Abbey. It was a cold and windy morning and we probably did not dress for it but the place was very cool. The arrangement of the graves were awesome and the abbey itself was worth the stop.
Written November 3, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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