National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting

National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting, West Chester: Tickets, Tours, Address, Phone Number, National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting Reviews: 4.5/5

National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting

National Voice of America Museum of Broadcasting
4.5
Popular mentions

4.5
29 reviews
Excellent
22
Very good
5
Average
1
Poor
0
Terrible
1

Joe2211a
1 contribution
Hidden Gem Relating Decades of Cold War History
Nov 2019
This museum is a hidden gem. Documenting more than 50 years of history from World War II through the 1990's this is the location where America broadcast the message of freedom to the rest of the world. Tour guided by enthusiastic volunteers whose passion for this museum and the mission it carried out carries through in all aspects of their presentation and the exhibits they maintain. Do Not Hesitate to Ask Questions! Very fortunate to have been also able to visit an operating ham radio "shack' which operates as part of the museum. WC8VOA contacts people from around the world. The operators were more than willing to answer any questions, tell the story of armature radio and make contacts with faraway stations (Italy in our case) while you visit. Well worth the few dollars admission price.
Written October 6, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

HDS1
Fairfield, OH791 contributions
Fascinating
Feb 2020
My wife and I went to the VOA Museum on a recent Sunday. Their website says to plan on 1 1/2 hours to visit; we were there for 2 1/2. You start with a short video on the history of the VOA, then a docent leads you around the rest of the museum. After that you can stroll around on your own. There are a number of different themes in different sections: the equipment and operation of the VOA, Cincinnati radio pioneer Powell Crosley and his other interests, the history of radio itself, and the history of radio and television in Cincinnati. It was well worth the time.
Written February 25, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

John L
Amanda, OH58 contributions
Was not open
Dec 2019 • Couples
Hours on web were much different than on the door. We as well as several other cars showed up to visit, but sll left. It was not open. Unfortunately, we planned our motel stay near this museum, but never got to got vis the changed limited hours. Cautio: call this place to make sure they are open.
Written December 17, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

bob A
Homestead, FL306 contributions
History At Its Best
May 2019 • Couples
This is a great piece of history from the 40s, 50s,60s and 70. The building and equipment is well perserve and presented. Other collections that deal the the radio and early TV industry has also be add to enhance your visit. There is an active Amature Radion Club with a club station in the Museum and will put you on the air if you wish. Fun for all.
Written May 24, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Steve Herman
Alexandria, VA391 contributions
An amazing treasure of broadcasting and Cincinnati history
Mar 2019 • Business
Anyone with an interest in broadcasting, international relations, WW2/Cold War history or any Cincinnatian should definitely spend some time her absorbing a rather unique museum occupying a historic building.
Much original equipment remains in place and the number of related exhibits keeps growing. The fact this has all been put together by an independent non-profit organization and volunteers makes it all the astounding.
Written March 8, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

T R
Cincinnati, Ohio132 contributions
Great educational and eye-opening experience!
Dec 2018 • Couples
This museum was once one of many radio relay stations for Voice of America broadcasting. Have passed by this museum numerous times between West Chester and Mason, but never went in until now. It is quite interesting! A history lesson and experience of broadcasting. Definitely worth the visit! Admission is $5 per person (cash), or $6 per person (credit cards). All volunteer run. There is a donation box at the entrance. Donations can be accepted online as well.
World famous VOA...locally unknown.
Written December 16, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Raymond C
Columbus, Ohio, United States31 contributions
More than history, it's AMERICA
Mar 2018 • Friends
Once the site of MASSIVE radio towers that broadcasted to the planet, this building is all that's left, but inside there's a piece of history everyone should see: just how America won the cold war (and then some) was THIS facility.

Antique equipment, incredibly large power lines, great displays including some of Cincinnati's broadcast (entertainment) history all await. Staff is more than happy to talk about the amazing things on display here, which is more than just wires and transmitters.
Written November 19, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Bob W
Maineville, OH472 contributions
History Adventure Cool Important
Aug 2018 • Friends
The museum is open every weekend from1-4pm on Sat and Sun.There are many well informed docents to make this an education and informative trip.There are always new displays to look at and the West Chester ham radio operators are usualally there operating one of their 7 stations.
Written August 27, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Jeff M
6 contributions
World famous, locally unknown
Sep 2017 • Family

The VOA is better known in far off corners of the world than in this country because their target audience was there, not here. Nevertheless, history and technical buffs will appreciate the important things that happened here in Cincinnati starting in WW2. At the time, they had the world's most powerful shortwave transmitters. The antenna farm took up a square mile. Also, the museum highlights the Cincinnati radio and TV broadcasting history, with many artifacts. Powel Crosley is honored because he not only was instrumental in bringing the VOA to this location, but he was a nationally known industrialist, broadcaster, and Reds owner. Once Cincinnati's largest employer. His many household products and car are on display. open weekends 1-4 pm $5
Written July 9, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

russellp117
Freeland, MI509 contributions
A GREAT piece of history!
May 2018 • Friends
The Voice of America was iconic during the 50's and 60's. I built a shortwave reciever and listened from out west. To now visit, was very good exciting! Much of the equipment is still located there. There also is a amatuer radio station(I made a contact to Belgium), a museum of Collins equipment, and a Powel Crosley museum. All were well thought out, and informative! There were lots of docents to fill in the history. What a great afternoon, and all for $5!
Written May 20, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

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