Lindisfarne Priory
Lindisfarne Priory
4.5
Historic SitesAncient RuinsPoints of Interest & Landmarks
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
About
Ahead of your visit please make sure to check our website for full opening times, as they vary depending on the tide times. English Heritage is a Charitable Trust taking care of over 400 historic sites throughout England. Lindisfarne Priory is one of these very precious sites. A substantial site where almost 1400 years ago St. Aidan, brought here by King Oswald, chose Lindisfarne to build his church and bring Christianity to the ancient Kingdom of Northumbria. Follow those years through our museum and exhibition and then walk through St. Mary's churchyard to the dramatic ruins where you can walk in the footsteps of the monks who inhabited this 12C Priory and monastic buildings. Hours of opening may vary due to the tides. For your own safety please check the tide times carefully.
Duration: 1-2 hours
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  • Bonymerlin111
    Manchester, United Kingdom189 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Beautiful ruins in an enchanting setting
    Atmospheric ruins run by English Heritage - definitely worth a visit. I would recommend getting the guide to make the most of the visit as you wander around - available in the shop. You also get a great view of the priory if you walk up to the Heugh (where there are also more ruins/remains of interest to see). The priory opens at 10am in May, but as always you do need to check the tide times if travelling over from the mainland!
    Thank you for your review. Our opening times vary due to the tides so we don't always open at 10am
    Written May 13, 2023
    This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
    Visited May 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written May 5, 2023
  • John B
    Rossendale, United Kingdom82 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Gets very busy
    Wanted to visit here for a long time and a holiday in Northumberland gave me the chance. After checking the tides we set off. Plenty of people were already there. I was slightly disappointed. I thought it would have been bigger, but what was there was fascinating.
    Visited June 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written June 9, 2023
  • Chris T
    Lincoln, United Kingdom377 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Stunning as always
    Not our first visit to the Priory, but you are still stunned by the place and its history. Buy the guide and read more about it than is given on the displays throughout the site. It's nothing like Fountains Abbey in grandeur, but historically so significant.
    Visited June 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written June 26, 2023
  • Roy V
    Leatherhead, United Kingdom633 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    A great and historic ruin
    The Green Lane car parking is a short walk from the Priory and is also the nearest to Lindisfarne Castle. We received a positive welcome at the Priory entrance building and there was good signage and information boards within. The views towards the castle are superb. Well worth a visit, but check the tide times first!.
    Visited July 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written July 13, 2023
  • TauntonBob
    West Parley, United Kingdom938 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Wonderfully atmospheric
    We were fortunate that on the day we visited, and having stayed on the island the night before, the tides were such that no one could get on to the island again until mid afternoon. This meant that we were able to stroll to the Priory at its opening time and have it virtually to ourselves.. Much more pleasant than queuing and battling the hoards! The ruins are very majestic and there is a good view from them across to the castle. It's a pity that there is not more about the famous Lindisfarne Gospels in the Priory museum.
    Visited July 2023
    Written July 19, 2023
  • Joasi23
    South Yorkshire, United Kingdom1,421 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Dramatic location and ruin
    Slightly confused initially regarding access without paying the entrance fee . We were surprised that only the interior part of the ruins necessitated a ticket . We could see the majority of the area as we made our way to the adjacent church . It was substantial and interesting , so much so we looked up the history , which we maybe should have before we visited .
    Visited July 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written July 22, 2023
  • Jane
    Leicestershire, United Kingdom15 contributions
    4.0 of 5 bubbles
    Steeped in History
    This place was the main reason for our short holiday in Northumberland. Lindisfarne Island has been on my 'bucket list' of places to visit forever and this year I finally got the opportunity to go. I was expecting a lot, and Lindisfarne island as a whole did not disappoint me. It was an early start, as we were governed by the tides crossing the causeway, information which is displayed around the village and also before you cross the causeway but which we had researched beforehand when we were planning our trip. (Safe crossing that particular day was 7:10am till 2:20pm) and it was about half an hour drive from where we were staying. However, because we chose to arrive on the island quite early we had the pick of the parking at the main public carpark (there is a second car park in the village but that is for disabled people only and you have to have a blue badge to park there, and that is also where the public toilets are situated) and after a short walk into the centre of the village managed to stay ahead of the majority of the tourists who didn't arrive till around 9:30/10am. We did a circuit of the castle, (but didn't go in) the harbour and the village and ended up at the ruins. After lunch we then walked around 'The Heugh' a large ridge of land which offered spectacular views over the Priory and whole area. The whole island exceeded expectations it really was a truly lovely place. Knowing the history of Lindisfarne priory and knowing just how old it is takes your breath away when you see it. The only 'gripe' I have is, I know that English Heritage are guardians for the place and they have to make it accessible for everyone but the modern additions around the site are little intrusive. There is also a small visitor centre which details the history of the place and displays artefacts which have been found at the site. Our visit to Lindisfarne Priory itself was quite short (just over an hour) in comparison to the total time we spent on the island, (over 5 hours) as a whole but it is well worth seeing.
    Visited July 2023
    Written July 27, 2023
  • Janeylou D
    Camberley, United Kingdom53 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    A beautifully peaceful and sacred place to rest and think.
    Sandy grey stones, emerald green grass, sapphire sky. Wow! You would be hard pushed to take a bad photograph here, whatever way you turned. We bought the guide book as it gave so much information and history. My husband sat and read it on one of the many benches set around the abbey whilst I must have covered every single inch looking at the ruins and the plants and insects happily bimbling amongst the buddleia plants growing against the walls. The member of staff in the ticket kiosk at the entrance will happily answer any questions, too. The gentleman who was there on our visit was extremely pleasant to chat to. Not really much for the youngsters, but well worth taking a picnic to sit and reflect and unwind from the trials of modern life. St. Cuthbert certainly knew what he was talking about ...
    Visited August 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written August 13, 2023
  • Cassini W
    9 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    Fantastic afternoon
    I'm a Viking and general history enthusiast and have wanted to visit this site for many years. The priory site was brilliant, although I would have liked more information boards. It was well worth the visit and the museum was enjoyable if small. My favourite part was the beach and island with St Cuthbert's grave and when we walked around the hillside we could see perfectly inside the priory...for free. I will be returning to further explore the island and watch the seals but won't pay to enter the priory again.
    Visited August 2023
    Traveled with family
    Written August 16, 2023
  • EnglandCath
    Wirral, United Kingdom239 contributions
    5.0 of 5 bubbles
    PRIORY IS BEAUTIFUL
    We had always wanted to visit and finally made it. It is very atmospheric but too busy and far too may dogs! We paid to enter , so the actual priory was quiet. Be warned we paid £17 for 2 white small rolls. Yes that is not a typo! £17.00 so take you own sandwiches. We did not pay that in AMALFI.
    Visited September 2023
    Traveled as a couple
    Written September 9, 2023
These reviews are the subjective opinion of Tripadvisor members and not of TripAdvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

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GuatemalaGringo
Manchester, UK55 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2021 • Couples
Visited the wild and windswept island of Lindisfarne in late April, had a lovely if cold walk around to the castle, beach and the village centre. We finished at the historical priory which we wrongly believed our National Trust membership would give us free access to, unfortunately not the case as it’s run by English Heritage Fair enough but when we realised it would be £14 each to visit the ruined ruins we politely declined and decided to view them from above at the observation point. Looking in we wondered how on earth they can charge £14 when the museum is closed and all you’re getting is a few Information boards for your dollar. Surely a price adjustment should be made considering the much lauded museum isn’t accessible due to covid restrictions!
Written April 29, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review. We are sorry you were disappointed with Lindisfarne Priory. It appears that you asked about National Trust members having free access but may have looked at the admissions board for the entry price rather than query it with a member of staff. The entry fee has actually been discounted to allow for the museum being closed. The price £14 you are quoting is for 1 adult plus a £4.50 Guide Book and including the donation to allow us to claim Gift Aid to visit both the Museum and the Priory Ruin. There are a range of entry fees to choose from e.g. with or without the Guide Book, with or without Gift Aid, Adult, Senior, Student or Families. Once again we are sorry you were disappointed and apologise if there was any misunderstanding of the information available to you.
Written May 20, 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

gail h
3 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2021
Talk about a sitting duck!!!!
Got up especially early to get onto holy island as soon as the tide would allow to make the most of it!
When we arrived at the car park which we had to use as it's a small village and access is actively discouraged we found we were allowed 3 hours for £4.50 or £7.50 for a full day. 3 hours seemed like we would be clock watching and given that it was only 9am and the tide allowed us to stay till 2pm we had 5 hours to wander round. Settling for the 3 hour rate we went to the Priory. It didn't open till 10 and was around £9 each .deciding to walk to the castle 1st along a lovely walk and then a steep climb up. the castle was closed because of covid which we knew. would have been a further £9 each . To see the Priory and the castle a total of £36 add on the car park for 3 hours and it's over £40 and that's just for 2 people for a mornings activities!
Back over in bamburgh and going into the lovely atmospheric church with a detailed history of the arrival of Christianity beautiful stained glass windows and lovely decorations and all for free. I wouldn't like to take a family to holy island!! Surely we should be allowed to view our heritage on these sites without getting a mortgage to do so!!!
Written May 2, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review. I can only comment on Lindisfarne Priory as this is its TripAdvisor page and not for the entire island. We are sorry that you were so disappointed with us. On the date of your visit our museum/exhibition was still under the lockdown rules and unable to open. The Priory, however was open and tickets for entry, to be pre booked online, were offered at a discounted price to compensate for this. As a charity we can assure you that we are very grateful for every admission fee or membership purchased. This helps to ensure that English Heritage can take care of and preserve over 400 historic sites not only for the present but for future generations to enjoy. Many of our sites remain free for all to enter.
Written May 18, 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

settrington19
Scarborough, UK47 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2021
The ladies toilets nearest the museum are unbelievably horrendous. Having paid over £4 to park and then another £12+ to go in the Priory, you would expect toilets to be a little bit better than when the Priory was first built in the Middle Ages. What a terrible impression overseas visitors must have of these primitive ablutions. They are a disgrace to Northumberland. We deserve better in this day and age. We had taken our cousins visiting from America & we were ashamed to go in there & to say that places like this still exist in the UK.
Written October 2, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
We are sorry that your visit to the island was such a disappointment but this is the review page for Lindisfarne Priory not the whole of the island! The car park and the toilets are run by Northumberland County Council so please complain to them. As a charity, English Heritage look after over 400 historic sites across England. Many of these are free to everyone to visit. Our staff are dedicated, hardworking and knowledgeable about the site and the island. Unfortunately your low rating and this review of the 'island's facilities' on this page, only reflect our performance.
Written October 19, 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

middleclasslass
North Yorkshire, UK157 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2022 • Couples
We have an English Heritage membership - £15 entry without - and visited the Lindisfarne Priory & Museum during the Easter holidays expecting it to be busier but we got in straight away and there was plenty of parking still on the island.

The museum has plenty of history on the life of St Cuthbert, including some good artist illustrations of what the wooden monastery would have looked like in his time and also what his cell on Inner Farne would have looked like. There are photographs of the possessions found in his tomb: the cross, the stole and the comb, plus photographs of his wooden coffin.

There are Anglo Saxon stone crosses in the museum which were found on the site of the Priory and artist illustrations of how they were painted and used.

For once the £5 guide book was actually worth buying! Many of the English Heritage books of abbeys I have purchased concentrate on the architecture where as this one has more information on the life of the people of this place over the centuries.

The stones of priory itself were not of particular interest to me but all the same it was meaningful to walk on the land where the old monastery would have been.

As I have an English Heritage membership it was definitely worth the visit but if I had paid £15 I probably would have felt ripped off as it takes less than an hour to walk around. Check tide times on the Northumberland Council website.
Written April 20, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your review. Like many people you have glanced at the admission price board and naturally focused on the first column. This shows the price for entry plus a guide book. The cost for an adult to enter the museum/exhibition and the Priory ruin is actually £9. We are trying to get this issue rectified. We really do appreciate your support as a member and indeed everyone who pays the admission price. This enables English Heritage to preserve and protect over 400 sites. Many of these are are free to all to visit.
Written April 27, 2022
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Rafal W
Skoki, Poland1,401 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2020
Founded in 7th century on the tidal island off the northern coast of England by comer from Iona Island, Irish monk Saint Aidan, sits Lindisfarne Priory. Request came from King Oswald, ruler of Northumbria. Lindisfarne became base for Christian evangelism in North England and Mercia. Lindisfarne Priory was also, like many other monasteries, centre of copying books.The team of illuminators and calligraphers from Holy Island has made, now famous, manuscript known as Lindisfarne Gospels. The Viking raid from year 793 during of which priory was looted and pillaged is often taken by modern historians as the beginning of the Viking Age but it was the Danes who sealed fate the Irish monastery. Still, despite Danes raids from the first half of the next century Priory flourished. It was the advance of the Danes to the north and fall of Kingdom of Northumbria in 875 that made Irish monks flee. Monastic life on Holy Island was re-established by Durham Priory in 1093, nearly three decades after Norman conquest. New, Benedictine congregation took over the remains of earlier, Irish monastery, and continued until its suppression in 1536. Due to the boarder warfare of the 13th and 14th centuries monks of Lindisfarne Priory were forced to fortify and man the priory, remains of such fortifications are still visible. The Lindisfarne Priory was relatively small religious house compare to other, richer one from other parts of England. Humble, monastery church was built around 1150 in late Romanesque, early Gothic style. In 14th century some alternations took a place there. After Dissolution of Monasteries priory slowly fell into disuse. Church's central tower has collapsed in the late 18th century, Priory's stone work was cannibalised by the locals or used for construction of small fort near the priory. The only way to get there leads via periodically flooded causeway connecting Holy Island with the rest of England. There are buses going every second day from Berwick Upon Tweed to Holy Island, but this time I've rented a car. While travelling to and from Lindisfarne one have to remember and follow rules regarding crossing the causeway or somebody may find oneself trapped in the middle of it by high tidal waves. The day I'd visited Lindisfarne priory was cloudy, windy and rainy. Under the dun skies of North Sea Holy Island looked grim and inhospitable. Same like in case of Whitby, advance ticket booking was required. It was worth seeing it, however, it didn't impress me that much like other monasteries that I've seen before.
Written March 23, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Simon B
Poole, UK94 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2020
Historic site that is well wort a visit. The museum is informative, telling the history of St Cuthbert, St Aiden and the Vikings that first landed in 793. Not a lot left of the Priory, but the ruins give you a feel of the size of it.
The island gets very busy, we went late September, so best to go out of school holidays. Also check the tide timetable as the causeway to the island will be cut off at high tide.
Written October 1, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for this great review. We are so pleased you enjoyed your visit.
Written October 5, 2020
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Vince H
Wisbech, UK467 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2021
The Priory is owned and run by English Heritage. Although derelict and in ruins, the priory still gives some sense of what life would have been like hundreds of years ago for St Aiden and his followers who inhabited Lindisfarne. The structure is still impressive and inspiring. It is testament to the building skills of the local labourers and masons that the rock arch still stands intact to this day. The ticket price includes entry to a lovely museum which we found very informative and with detailed information relating to the history of the Priory. We found the whole visit to be good value for money.
As a side, it is worth mentioning that a visit to Holy Island is altogether an experience not to be missed. The whole island has an atmosphere of peace and tranquility which is rarely experienced in the modern world. You are able to just switch off and soak up the atmosphere. A perfect place to spend a few hours away from the hubbub of daily life.
Written September 19, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for the lovely review.
Written October 3, 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

John C
Sheffield, UK266 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2021 • Couples
Lindisfarne is an atmospheric & evocative place, & the Priory is at the heart of it. The visit starts with a tour of the museum, which tells the story of Holy Island clearly & interestingly, then after an exit through the gift shop, you can wander around the remains of the Priory, which are quite spectacular.

Everything was well organised, so a very worthwhile time was had by all
Written July 14, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Thank you for your lovely review. We really do appreciate your comments.
Written July 15, 2021
This response is the subjective opinion of the management representative and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

AlinaRC
Hertfordshire1,533 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2022
The beautifully atmospheric ruins of the priory are a must see on a visit to Lindisfarne, or even the North East of England. The most dramatic feature is the rainbow arch, a surviving part of the central tower. This isn't the Lindesfarne that St Cuthbert would have known, what we see now was built in the 12th century, when the threat of attacks from the sea was reduced. Apart from the tower, the other striking feature is the west front, which you arrive through to enter the church. If you have also visited Durham cathedral, much of the architecture will look very similar. While not as dramatic, its worth taking some time to explore the working areas - where bread was baked, beer brewed and horses stabled. It has one of the most intact set of service buildings of any in the UK. There are glorious views across the harbour and to the castle.

The area is administered by English Heritage, who also run a visitors centre which gives an account of the history. Both are open till 5pm in the summer, tides permitting. There are benefits to going at the start or end of the day, depending on tide times if you want some quiet to enjoy the atmosphere. We had it more or less to ourselves visiting at 4pm. On the practical side there are no toilets onsite - there are free public toilets a couple of minutes walk from the visitors centre. There is a charge to visit unless you are an English Heritage/ Cadw member. English Heritage do a professional job managing the monument. Only slight irritation was the amount of 20th Century clutter, signs, more signs, boards that seemed to get into every photograph.
Written July 21, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

David T
Weybridge, UK189 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2023 • Couples
Interesting ruins but in a very commercialised setting. Extremely windy. You have to park in the poorly maintained main car park for the Island at a cost of £6. Tickets had to be purchased at the same tills used by the museum gift shop so there was a long queue.
Written October 1, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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