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Hacienda San Lorenzo Oxman

270 Reviews
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Hacienda San Lorenzo Oxman

270 Reviews
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North west of Valladolid, Valladolid 97780 Mexico
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All-Inclusive Chichen Itza, Valladolid with Cenote Swim & Mexican Buffet

1,033 reviews
Chichen Itza is an ancient Maya city in Mexico that was abandoned in the 15th century. Now a UNESCO World Heritage-listed archaeological park, its intact temples, and famous stepped pyramids may be explored during this comprehensive guided tour, which tops off fun-filled history lessons with a visit to the colonial town of Valladolid and a swim in a sacred limestone waterhole. A savory buffet lunch is also included.
$64.00 per adult
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Jordan wrote a review Nov 7
4 contributions
A few reasons not to visit this cenote: - Way too busy - Expensive - 1/4 mile from the city dump We went to cenote oxman on a sunday afternoon in October 2020 when the state of Yucatán was in the traffic light designation of orange, meaning things can only be open at 30% capacity. Well, cenote Oxman was totally packed and easily at 100% capacity. In the middle of the pandemic, it was difficult to get more than 2 feet away from anyone else. We read in the reviews that the entry fee can be applied to their restaurant. Well, that wasn't the case for us, their restaurant was closed and it was still 150 pesos per person to get in. I'd recommend going to cenote zaci instead. That cenote doesn't require you to drive there, if you're staying anywhere in Valladolid it's a pretty easy walk, it's only 30 pesos to get in, and it's just as pretty as cenote oxman.
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Date of experience: October 2020
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chrisanddunc wrote a review Jun 2020
Northampton, United Kingdom223 contributions30 helpful votes
Stopped here while travelling with Homys Tours on the way back from Chichen Itza and was chosen for it’s fairly easy access into and out of the water. 80ish steps down to the ceynote but steps are solid and there is a handrail. Changing rooms at ground level. There is a ladder into the water which makes access easier than others I saw which had a platform to jump off and haul yourself back onto! Fantastically clear and cool water was just what we wanted after a few hours walking around Chichen Itza.
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Date of experience: March 2020
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Luana B wrote a review Apr 2020
9 contributions4 helpful votes
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My husband and I visited the Oxman Cenote in Feb. 2020 as part of a day tour that also included Chichen Itza, a Mayan cultural center and the village of Valladolid. This was one of the coolest tours we have been on, and we would love to bring our kids back and do it again! The Oxman Cenote was definitely a highlight. It was unlike anything we had ever seen before, and was incredibly beautiful and fascinating, and a must-see for visitors to the Yucatan peninsula, especially if you come as far as Chichen Itza. We were staying in Playa del Carmen, so it made for a long day, but was so worth it, and we would do it again in a heartbeat! The hacienda is an unexpected little oasis set back off the beaten path and through the jungle, but not too far from Chichen Itza, and DEFINITELY worth the trip. The hacienda as a whole was both very charming and very clean, and had all the needed amenities—bathrooms, changing rooms, food & drinks, and even a beautiful swimming pool. The cenote itself is deep down in the ground, and you can get an awesome view of it from above before descending down the steps on the inside. (Pictures don’t do it justice.) Once down inside the cenote, you feel like you’re in some kind of jungle adventure movie, with the damp stony walls, the deep blue-green water and the jungle vines hanging down everywhere. Although there were several people there, it didn’t feel crowded at all. There are free life jackets to use (recommended) of all sizes, and there were plenty available. You can enter the water either from steps that go right down to the water, or be more adventurous and use the awesome jungle rope swing (recommended!) and swing out from a platform over the water and let go. (It kind of makes you feel like Tarzan!) The water is a little on the cool side, but definitely refreshing—especially after a hot morning at Chichen Itza. It was all absolutely perfect, until we had a little mishap. But read on…it all ended better than we could’ve hoped for! I jumped in first, from the rope swing, while my husband took a video of me. Then he jumped in from the rope swing, with my iPhone in a waterproof phone pouch, with the strap wrapped around his wrist and clutching the pouch the best he could in his hand (not recommended!). When he hit the water, the impact was hard enough that it broke the pouch off the strap, knocked the pouch out of his hand, and what we thought was a floating pouch sank down, down, down, complete with all the pictures from our whole Mexico trip and also my heart (this happened one day before we came home). And ironically, my photo cloud backup had not been working right since we had come to Mexico, so none of those pictures were backed up. I’m not sure why we didn’t think through that whole scenario before jumping into a 260 foot deep body of water, but I think we were too excited about how cool the place was and wanting to capture it all on camera. (We recommend you do that from the side, not from the rope swing!) We borrowed a snorkel mask from someone, frantically searching for the phone and hoping that maybe it would float up like it was supposed to, but with no luck. Our guide and the workers at the cenote were sympathetic and all tried their best to help us, but without scuba gear, the water was too deep to go down and search, and the phone didn’t turn up. Unfortunately we spent the rest of our time there searching and trying to figure out what to do, so we didn’t get to enjoy the rest of the hacienda like we would have liked to do (another reason to go back!). Finally it was time for our tour to leave, so all we could do was leave our contact info, in case by some miracle my phone showed up, and we were given the cenote owner’s phone number and email address. The next day on our way to the airport, we called and spoke to Juan Pablo, the owner, to see if by chance it had turned up, but still nothing. He asked me to email him when I got home, so I did. He told me they send divers down once a month to clean out the cenote, and that he would have them look for my phone the next time they did. But with as big as the cenote was, and with as much as things settle in the fine sediment down that deep, and with a waterproof pouch that first of all wasn’t rated for that deep, and second, definitely wasn’t rated for underwater protection for that long, we knew it was a long shot. About three weeks after we returned home from Mexico, we got the happy news that one of the divers cleaning out the cenote had found my phone. My phone was passcode protected, but he charged it to see if it would still even turn on, and it did. The phone seemed to be in perfect condition, although the pouch was completely destroyed. They found it at about 200 feet deep, so all we can figure is that the pressure that deep must have been so much that it basically vacuum packed my phone in the pouch—destroying the pouch, but protecting my phone from the water for three weeks. But even more remarkable than my phone being found and in perfect condition was the fact that everyone was so honest about it and intent on returning it to me. Juan Pablo paid about $60 (US) up front to send my phone via Intl. FedEx Express from Mexico to the US, even though he didn’t know me and had no way to know if I would really reimburse him. Then he sent me a picture of the FedEx package with its labels (addressed to me, and with the cenote’s return address) and the tracking number and shipping receipt. Within about four days of that, I had my phone back, miraculously in perfect condition, and complete with all the pictures from our Mexico trip! (Told you it had a happy ending! And of course I reimbursed him, with some extra as a thank you.) So not only was the cenote itself absolutely incredible and one of the coolest places we have ever been, but also Juan Pablo, the owner, is honest, kind, helpful, and has given us some of the best customer service of anywhere we’ve been. He and his staff definitely went above and beyond in helping us with a mishap that was entirely our own fault, and thanks to them, our story had a very happy ending, and now we have our Mexico trip photos to enjoy for years to come so we can remember all our great adventures! The Oxman Cenote is definitely worth checking out with the whole family (those who aren’t adventurous enough to get in the cenote water can just enjoy some lunch or the beautiful pool there!) Go visit this cenote, not just because it is an amazing place, but also to support the awesome locals that own and work there. They have earned our trust and loyalty, and we hope it’s not too long before we can return with our kids to show them this unique hidden gem!
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Date of experience: February 2020
4 Helpful votes
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Olenka wrote a review Apr 2020
Northampton, United Kingdom581 contributions171 helpful votes
Oxman Hacienda is based next to the hacienda. You need to go down to the hole in the ground by walking down concrete steps. The cenote is not very big. The biggest attraction for us was the rope swing and jumping into water was cool. All people jumping used the life jackets that were provided for free. The attendant was very nice and you can leave tip for him in a tip box.
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Date of experience: November 2019
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BrittanyAdventures wrote a review Apr 2020
Winnipeg, Canada3,182 contributions409 helpful votes
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I visited Cenote Oxman on March 1, 2020 while staying in Valladolid. I have previously visited here on two occasions in 2015, and this is one of my favourite cenotes in the Yucatan. It's kind of a secret local gem. I had rented a bicycle from my hostel and cycled about 15 minutes to the cenote (approx. 4 km south of Valladolid). After cycling through the city south on Calle 54, the road turned to gravel and followed through the peaceful countryside. There was a sign at the corner of the road leading to the cenote pointing out the direction (turn right at the corner). This was a very bumpy and pothole-filled road that eventually led to the entrance to the cenote. There was some bike parking or you could lock it against a tree in the parking lot. The cenote was on the property of a restored hacienda that was painted in a bright yellow colour with a cobbled path leading to the entrance. It was situated on a beautiful rural setting that was quiet and surrounded by jungle. There were two options for the entrance fee - you could pay 150 pesos which included access to the cenote, swimming pool on-site, and 150 pesos worth of food at the on-site restaurant; or you could pay 70 pesos for entrance to the cenote only. The 150 peso option was a fantastic deal and you essentially get your money back with free food at the restaurant. The facilities had improved since my last visit here in 2015. There were new changing rooms, washrooms, locker area, hammocks, and picnic table seating with netting around the pool for the restaurant seating. Cenote Oxman was sooo beautiful. It was a large, open cenote that was deep underground and there were quite a few winding stairs to get to a natural rock platform at the bottom. Long tree roots dangled from the ground into the cenote water. There was a rope swing to jump into the water, and it was fun watching people. The water was so cool and refreshing and there were lots of little black fish swimming around. After swimming in the cenote, I enjoyed relaxing in one of the lounge chairs by the outdoor pool and a delicious lunch of guacamole and fresh juices. There were only a few local families and a few tourists at the cenote and pool during my visit, and it was pretty quiet which was awesome. Not crowded at all! I love this cenote because it's off the beaten path and lesser known than others in the area. It's located in a peaceful rural setting and is absolutely beautiful! I visited during late morning and early afternoon and it was lovely. Would recommend.
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Date of experience: March 2020
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