The Powder House

The Powder House, Exeter: Address, Phone Number, The Powder House Review: 5/5

The Powder House
5
Historic Sites • Points of Interest & Landmarks • Historic Walking Areas
What people are saying
Maurene_K
By Maurene_K
IMPORTANT HISTORIC SITE & A WALKING TRAIL
Mar 2021
After having seen The Powder House from the other side of the Squamscott River numerous times, I wanted to try to see it up close. As a historian, it had long fascinated me. I researched it and found that it was accessible by the end of Jady Hill Ave at Powder Point. This Powder House is a very historic site. It was built in 1771 ~ four years before the official start of the American Revolutionary War. And, it was not too soon because, after the raid on Fort William & Mary in New Castle near Portsmouth on December 14th & 15th, 1774 ~ 4 months before the Battles of Lexington & Concord, MA, some of the ammunition taken during the raid was stored at this powder house and some went into the cellar of the meetinghouse in front of Major General John Sullivan’s house along the Oyster River in Durham. Some of the powder stored here was used in the Battle of Bunker Hill in Charlestown, MA on June 17, 1775. The Powder House also stored and supplied half of the State of New Hampshire’s ammunition for battles during the War of 1812. The Powder House was refurbished in 1999. The Town of Exeter fires off its July 4th fireworks from Powder Point. On arrival on the day of my visit, I learned that this was part of a walking trail that passed several historic sites. There was an info board in front of The Powder House. Some of the best known places are the American Independence Museum, the Ladd-Gilman House, and Folsom Tavern. During my trek around on a sunny Sunday in the mid 50’s, I found lots of people out walking – some alone, some with dog, and a few couples. I also learned that this is not situated on the river but on Clemson Pond adjacent to the river. The pond is home to some wildlife. I saw several turtles basking in the sun up on tufts of reeds or grasses along the shore. One person told of a sighting of a red-tailed hawk that landed a couple of feet from him. Others told about seeing bald eagles regularly. Exeter is s town steeped in history. The Powder House is just one of the historic sites from Colonial times that have been preserved for hundreds of years. For its scenic setting, its condition, and its historic importance for its roles in two wars in the fight for independence from England, I rate The Powder House at 5.0. It’s a “Must-See Historic Site” in Exeter. If you found this review helpful, please click THANK below.

Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing

5.0
1 review
Excellent
1
Very good
0
Average
0
Poor
0
Terrible
0

Maurene_K
Dover, NH7,984 contributions
IMPORTANT HISTORIC SITE & A WALKING TRAIL
Mar 2021
After having seen The Powder House from the other side of the Squamscott River numerous times, I wanted to try to see it up close. As a historian, it had long fascinated me. I researched it and found that it was accessible by the end of Jady Hill Ave at Powder Point.

This Powder House is a very historic site. It was built in 1771 ~ four years before the official start of the American Revolutionary War. And, it was not too soon because, after the raid on Fort William & Mary in New Castle near Portsmouth on December 14th & 15th, 1774 ~ 4 months before the Battles of Lexington & Concord, MA, some of the ammunition taken during the raid was stored at this powder house and some went into the cellar of the meetinghouse in front of Major General John Sullivan’s house along the Oyster River in Durham. Some of the powder stored here was used in the Battle of Bunker Hill in Charlestown, MA on June 17, 1775.

The Powder House also stored and supplied half of the State of New Hampshire’s ammunition for battles during the War of 1812.

The Powder House was refurbished in 1999.

The Town of Exeter fires off its July 4th fireworks from Powder Point.

On arrival on the day of my visit, I learned that this was part of a walking trail that passed several historic sites. There was an info board in front of The Powder House. Some of the best known places are the American Independence Museum, the Ladd-Gilman House, and Folsom Tavern.

During my trek around on a sunny Sunday in the mid 50’s, I found lots of people out walking – some alone, some with dog, and a few couples.

I also learned that this is not situated on the river but on Clemson Pond adjacent to the river. The pond is home to some wildlife. I saw several turtles basking in the sun up on tufts of reeds or grasses along the shore. One person told of a sighting of a red-tailed hawk that landed a couple of feet from him. Others told about seeing bald eagles regularly.

Exeter is s town steeped in history. The Powder House is just one of the historic sites from Colonial times that have been preserved for hundreds of years.

For its scenic setting, its condition, and its historic importance for its roles in two wars in the fight for independence from England, I rate The Powder House at 5.0. It’s a “Must-See Historic Site” in Exeter.

If you found this review helpful, please click THANK below.
Written March 28, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Frequently Asked Questions about The Powder House