Lumbini Monastic Site
Lumbini Monastic Site
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles218 reviews
Excellent
113
Very good
68
Average
21
Poor
8
Terrible
8

Toru O
Setagaya, Japan2,928 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2022 • Solo
You can visit Buddhist temples from around the world. You can admire the architectural designs of each country’s temple.
Most temples will deny entry if you don’t wear garments that cover your shoulders and knees.
Best to rent a bicycle or motorbike to tour the area yourself. Watch out for terribly paved streets and cow feces.
Written August 1, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dr R M Thapa Syangja
Putalibazar, Nepal346 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2023 • Friends
You can tour all the temples and monasteries on foot or on a boat. This is a small boat ride. The water is clean. Tourists from all over the place could be seen humbled at the nativity site.
Written December 30, 2023
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

venkatesh501
Belgaum, India160 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2015 • Couples
LUMBINI in Nepal is a birth place of Lord Buddha and a holy place of Buddhism. There are several Monestries in entire campus constructed by countries promoting Buddhism and for the convenience, benefit of the people from those countries visiting this Holy Place. Tourist can hire tricycle to go around all the monestries. The birth place of Lord Buddha is well preserved and boards are installed for the tourists to know the importance of the Place. Very impressive place to visit.
Written September 25, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Christine B
44 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2022
What could be a place of harmony and peaceful reflection is one of filth, loud music, and what seemed to be a good idea at the time but never got finished. Lack of security, expanse, and isolation makes this a predator's haven. Please be careful girls wandering around the area, especially in the late afternoon. A bunch of male Tuk-tuk drivers seems to congregate mocking the foreign women. It's only a matter of time before someone is attacked. It is badly signposted so unless you are on a tuk-tuk tour good luck with finding the temples. The Cambodian, Myanmar and Thai temples are along a dusty, dirty, unsealed road. You will pass signs that say "please be silent" "please don't play loud music over speakers in the picnic area", "please don't litter." Totally pointless because any semblance of quiet or peaceful enjoyment of the temples is shattered by people yelling into their phones or at each other. Buddha's birthplace backs onto the picnic area where people do what the sign tells them not to do...play loud music over speakers. The waterways are polluted with rubbish that people were too lazy to put in the bin. Signs on the bins advising people to keep "Lumbini clean" are only written in English...so apparently the English are the ones throwing crap on the ground & into the water. I found it very difficult to find any level of spirituality in this place. If the Taj Mahal was treated with such disrespect there would be worldwide condemnation.
Written March 15, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Holidays to Nepal
Kathmandu, Nepal38 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2015 • Friends
Lumbini is the peerless landmark of the Buddhist world. It is the birthplace of Gautam Buddha. It is recognized as a pilgrimage of all the people of the who follow Buddhism. UNESCO enlisted Lumbini as a world heritage site in 1997 AD. The Ashok pillar which was made by emperor Ashoka in 245 BC is located here. Some other attractions of Lumbini are Puskarini pond, Maya Devi temple, monasteries, stupas, libraries, museums and research center. One should visit in their lifetime.
Written December 6, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ricardo R
Mogi das Cruzes, SP1,881 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2017 • Solo
Many budhist countries contributes with this place and each conubtry constructed a caracteristic temple in this area. So we find thai, cambodian, indian, nepali, japanese temple among many others. I think the most beautiful is the Mianmar pagoda.
The temples are scattered in a big area, difficult to see them all by walking.
Best to hire a cycle rickshaw and go to see most of them and the Maya Devi temple ( Boudha´s birth place ). I bargained a cycle rickshaw for 300 nepali rupees for a 3 hs ride and saw many of them. From the border we can take a bus to Bairahawa and then another to Lumbini, the bus stop is in front Maya Devi temple and each bus is around 25 rupees.
Written October 28, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

sangeetasrivastava
Lucknow, India128 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2014 • Family
We visited Lumbini in November 2014.This is the birth place of Gautam Budhdha. We rented a maruti car taxi and visited different monastries built by several countries. We went to French, German, Burmese, Japanese, Vietnamese, Chinese, Singaporean and Nepalese monastic sites along with Mayadevi temple, Ashoka pillar, peace flame and World Peace Pagoda.
Written October 21, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Amrit Atwal
4 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019 • Couples
Lumbini, the birth place of Siddharta Gautama. The birth place of Buddha. This "village" (it's neither a city, nor a village, it's just a place) is full with Hindus and Buddhists and there is no place in the world that is more spiritual which you will realise very soon after arriving here. Or is that so?

To be fair, my husband and I stayed in Lumbini for only approximately two days. But we don't regret this shortage of time because we feel like two days were more than enough to experience the true and full atmosphere of this area. Within these two days, we were able to visit the temples all around, eat at the local restaurants and get to know three locals. During this time we stayed at the Lumbini Lodge Village- a hostel that is located in the exact road where most of the other hostels are located. And this is where the problem begins.

Lumbini is made for tourists. It's a tourist area. There's a hostel next to a restaurant next to a hostel next to a tourist information centre next to a hostel and so on. All this while the locals sell their products nearby but none of the tourists need to go there because every necessity is conveniently right next to you. Of course, some people still take the time to experience the whole place. But do you really want to do that when the air around you numbs you out and, much more importantly, when you see how the people here actually live? It's not spiritual. It's not beautiful. It's a disaster.

We met two homeless boys, called Raj and Bahu (if I remember his name right), both aged 12. They were wonderful. Also, they looked half their age due to malnutrition and therefore, slow bodily development. Raj's parents are in jail while Bahu's parents have died. I am lucky that I was able to talk to them with the little bit of Hindi that I speak and they said there is no one to take care of them. Instead, they take care of each other. While eating dinner with them, a local called them over and slapped Bahu in the face because "he comes here everyday." I said it's none of his business and to leave him alone. He doesn't seem to be very successful with his begging, given the fact that he is dangerously malnourished.

During the temple visits there were tons of beggars. Some had no hands, some were blind and some were simply homeless while carrying a baby in their arm. Their conditions and lifes are the product of the overwhelming poverty in Lumbini. That has nothing to do with a nice, beautiful, spiritual spot. Like I said: It's a disaster. Moreover, in our opinion, the temples are worth a visit but don't get your hopes up too high. Nowhere is there any closer information given about the temples- not even about Buddhism itself. At the spot where Buddha was supposedly born it literally just said "Buddha's exact birth place." And it was very uneventful to go there. It's just a glas window that visitors throw money on, for good luck I guess.

The tourists only go to these temples to take cool pictures with them so that they can show the pictures to their family and friends and then never look at them again. It was quite annoying to stand and wait because someone who probably had no connection to it at all, needed to take a picture of him with a Buddha statue while making a peace sign. To me, this is very ridiculous. I might be over-reacting because tourist hotspots are always like that but I just don't get it. And I especially don't get it when it happens at a supposedly holy place. By the way, if you hope to see and meet a lot of religious people here: You won't. There were only a handful of monks in the whole area.

I don't mean to say that no one takes care of the temples. The temple areas themselves were pretty clean but they haven't really done anything with them. At this point, I can't even really judge the countless people who just walk by those gigantic buildings after taking a selfie because there is really nothing else to do. As I said, it would have been nice to at least have something to read- about the building and structure of the temples, the religion itself etc.

It seems like tourism and hostels are more important than the people who live here. This might be the case almost everywhere. It most likely is. Which makes no place on this earth really spiritual.

So don't get your hopes up too high if you want to visit Lumbini. Don't visit this place with the thought "I want to be in the birth place of Buddha before I die" or "that's the place where I will find true enlightenment and peacefulness." In my opinion, if you see and digest the circumstances just as they are, you will only find poverty and desolation.

In the end, I just wish there is more one can do for the kids who live here on the streets or just anywhere in the world on the streets. We were at least able to give Raj and Bahu new shoes and some more money to eat. I really liked them a lot. And on the first evening, they even came by and gave my husband and me each a piece of banana. Whilst this being a wonderful gesture, their kindness also broke my heart. I will never forget them.
Written October 5, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

vikast_11
Huntington Beach, CA93 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2019 • Family
Lumbini is a holy city for Buddhists, so those visiting on a pilgrimage should enjoy their time at the site. A more casual tourist may find the site does not live up to the standards of other UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

The main attractions of the Monastic site are the birthplace of Buddha and Buddhist monasteries constructed by the Buddhist communities from the around the world.

The birthplace of Buddha, the Maya Devi Temple, was serene. However, most of the temple consists of a wood walkway surrounding temple ruins and a highlight of where Lord Buddha was born. Getting to the Maya Devi Temple requires about a 15 minute walk from the main entrance of the grounds, which can be challenging in Nepalese summers.

The monasteries built by Buddhist communities around the world can be interesting. Each monastery reflects the nation's architecture and view of Buddhism. The monasteries are spread out throughout the area and require some type of taxi to get from some monasteries to others. The Myanmar (Burma), Thai and German monasteries were particularly interesting. Other monasteries weren't particularly exciting or notable, such as India's monastery.

The heat of May made walking between monasteries a bit of a challenge. Moreover, the overall area did not seem well maintained. Many of the water features were turned off and were collecting dust.
Written May 28, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

antalkovacss
Bonn, Germany5 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2016 • Friends
I think I had too high expectations concerning Lumbini. The site is actually a huge square compound built in the middle of a very undeveloped village-town-field area inhabited by people who look and speak like Indians. Walking alone i the surrounding villages is maybe not the best thing I would do, especially after 4-5 PM... I also think that the megalomaniac palaces that they erected in the name of Buddhism there, do not anyhow remind one of Gautama Buddha's teachings of modesty...I was traveling so far to get to this place, and was lightly disappointed, to say the truth. Some monasteries care more about your donations than anything else. I stayed a few days in the house of my Nepalese friend, so I cannot describe the accommodation. But my Russian friend wanted to stay in the Chinese Temple, ad they refused him, saying only Chinese people can stay there. It felt unpleasant. Maya Devi Temple is but relatively modest and a strong feeling. So I do recommend Lumbini, just that count with a one-day visit and rather return to Kathmandu, Pokhara or Chitwan...
Written April 25, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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