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Hail to the Sunrise / Mohawk Park

27 Reviews
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Hail to the Sunrise / Mohawk Park

27 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
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Road569785 wrote a review Nov 2020
1 contribution
The cast bronze statue is magnificent. I have seen it may times and it is overwhelming. However it actually faces the river crossing which the Mohawks used to traverse when they came to collect wampum from their underling tribes. Or to raid.
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Date of experience: May 2020
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Shelburne Falls resident wrote a review Sep 2020
1 contribution
Hail to the Sunrise is a culturally inaccurate Native American statue that exemplifies how history has been rewritten through a colonizer’s lens to promote tourism. The Mohawk Trail, misnamed for a Native American tribe that was NOT native to this Massachusetts region, is a beautiful, historic area to explore, yet it’s important to understand when and where its history has been misrepresented, for example, with this statue. Coming across this statue (before its likely future removal) is a starting point to understanding one example of cultural appropriation. The Hail to the Sunrise statue features a Native American man dressed in clothing that was NOT traditional to the tribes native to this area. The statue, created by sculptor Joseph Pollia, was installed by a whites-only, males-only organization known as the Improved Order of Red Men in October of 1932. While more than 2,000 people gathered to witness this monument’s installation, it failed to accurately represent the region’s Native American heritage. The area around Charlemont has other inappropriate Native American attractions worth understanding better during our society’s renewed attempts to correct racist symbols.
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Date of experience: September 2020
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Chris P wrote a review Feb 2020
Ivoryton, Connecticut6 contributions4 helpful votes
These statues are beautifully sculpted and really capture the natural spirit of North West Massachusetts. Although each only requires a few minutes out of the car, they are each placed in great locations with pleasant views. You won't get more beauty for your buck than these.
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Date of experience: August 2019
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Weekend_Roamer1 wrote a review Dec 2017
Warrington, United Kingdom715 contributions316 helpful votes
On I2 Mohawk Trail you are upon this little park almost instantly and it is either a stamp on the brakes or sail past and make a U-turn (I did the latter) because you do not really get any warning and if they want more visitors to stop and appreciate the park then they should put up a half mile attraction sign and perhaps provide a little better parking. basically there is a road alongside the small park and that is where we left our vehicle as we took a look around. If you know the history then this place will hold some significance but you do not really get the opportunity of tranquil reflection as timber trucks thunder past 100 yards away. If you get a break in the traffic then you do get to understand the inspiration behind the monument and stone mosaic.
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Date of experience: October 2017
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inua7 wrote a review Oct 2017
Colrain, Massachusetts14 contributions2 helpful votes
The statue is of a pretty handsome fellow, in a very lovely area, but to be honest - this is Mohican and Nipmuc territory/homelands, NOT Mohawk. The fountain was erected by The Royal Order of the Red Men, in which you must be white to join, then given a "Indian" name, which is on the placards. The placards are not tribes or actual Indigenous people, but members of a cult group. Complete cultural appropriation, and misinformation given in a romanticized colonizer POV.
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Date of experience: October 2017
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