Silk Mill

Silk Mill, Lonaconing: Address, Silk Mill Reviews: 4.5/5

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Forsakenfotos
Eldersburg, MD4 contributions
The Owner Sadly Passed in 2019
Mar 2019 • Solo
Not sure of the faith of this Silk Mill because Herb Crawford, the owner passed in 2019. I found his daughter but she never replied about the Mill. I knew Herb so well, and sent so many photographers to him ... i was honored with a lifetime free pass. My heart is broken he is gone !
Written February 4, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Shutter_Lady14
Binghamton, NY98 contributions
Preserving History
Jun 2017
The Lonaconing Silk Mill was shuttered in 1957, but everything inside was left as it was at that point, making for a step back in time. It is only open by appointment and mostly to photographers, but what an experience and photographic opportunity it was. Although the building is starting to fall into disrepair (holes in the roof, puddles on the floor) it is still an amazing place to view the past and imagine what it was like when fully operational. Thousands of silk spools, rows of machinery, shoes still in place, 1957 calendars still hanging, packing crates - amazing!
Written June 23, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.

Patrick S
Laurel, MD401 contributions
An interesting artifact
Dec 2015 • Solo
The old Klotz Throwing Mill, popularly know as the Lonaconing Silk Mill, closed and locked its doors in August of 1957, due to a labor dispute. It is intact inside. The 1957 calendar is on the wall, and the workers lunch pails are on the desks. It is a time capsule.

This mill was the recipient of raw silk from the far east, coming to the west coast in sailing ships, and rushed across country in special priority trains. At the lonaconing facility, the raw silk was transformed into thread. It then went to mills in eastern Pennsylvania by train.

The old factory has been visited by American Pickers and a Smithsonian Film Crew.
Every one wants to restore it, but it is structurally beyond that. It is privately owned, and not generally open.

There was a similar facility in Cumberland, some 15 miles away. The building survives, but is empty.
Written May 1, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC.
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