Pullman Historic District
Pullman Historic District
4.5
Tours & experiences
Explore different ways to experience this place.

Top ways to experience Pullman Historic District and nearby attractions

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles58 reviews
Excellent
28
Very good
22
Average
6
Poor
2
Terrible
0

citywoman99
14 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Pullman is not a typical tourist site - it's a living, breathing neighborhood. There aren't many signs, no costumed interpreters or labels on the buildings. But if you do some homework - read about the founding of the town, the labor movement that started there, the significance of the different types of housing - the town will come alive for you. There's a library with a good collection of original materials just west of the historic area, at 11001 S. Indiana. Although it's a walkable distance, plan to drive there. There is a foundation office that will help you get started on your walking tour, and in the fall, some homes are open for tour. Although it's a walkable distance, plan to drive there. There are some works in progress - the Florence Hotel is being renovated, as are Market Square and the original administration building. As you're strolling around the town, try talking to one of the old men sitting out on the stoop in the sun - it might just turn out that he worked at the Pullman shops or was the son of someone who did.

There is not a lot to see in the area except for Pullman, nor are there any restaurants in the historic area at present, but it's a great day trip if you're visiting the city. (homework hint: the amount of detail in the brickwork and trim reflected the status of the workmen who lived within.)
Written January 22, 2006
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Spirit7dancer
Dayton, OH100 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2015 • Couples
I have NEVER had a bad experience with a National Park before and this was the first. I was really looking forward to visiting this site. When we got there, the guy at the front desk was reading, looked up, and said "Hiii? Can I help you?" (a tone that seemed to translate in "are you lost?") After visiting 6 parks over the past week, I was a little taken back as the other parks are so welcoming. I said I was here to get a stamp and check it out...he said ok and went back to reading. Other rangers at the other parks always stood up and seemed engaging, telling us about the center, events, places to check out while we are here, and more importantly, made us feel welcome. We walked around the center and I wanted to purchase a magnet. I placed it on the counter and he just looked at me weird. I said I wanted to purchase it and he said some lady's name around the corner takes the money. I felt so awkward going into someone's office and asking if I could buy a magnet. The lady looked at me weird too...at this point, I decided I just wanted to get out of there. I felt so unwelcome, so uncomfortable that I just wanted to leave. I told the lady that I changed my mind and left. I always like to support the parks beyond my yearly pass with a purchase of some kind. Luckily, I learned everything I needed from wikipedia and a few other sites prior to going, else I would have walked out not learning much. The only nice person who greeted us was a guy, dressed in shorts and t-shirt who I assume was doing work outside, who was coming in as we were leaving and said welcome, thanks for stopping by!
Written September 19, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Roger101052
Fort Scott, KS116 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2015 • Couples
As a history teacher I found the site fascinating and I hope that now that the NPS is involved it can be better preserved. The NPS ranger we dealt with could barely take his eyes off his computer screen to answer questions. He acted bothered that we would disturb him and some of his answers were condescending.
Written July 16, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

DoctorJoeE
North Caldwell, NJ449 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Definitely worth your time, especially if you are interested in American history. This was the very first planned community. Most of the homes remain occupied, and are beautifully maintained (at least the exteriors). The nice lady in the visitor center will set you up with a map and directions for a walking tour, which takes an hour at most. The hotel is undergoing restoration, but you can walk around the first floor. The Pullman factory, now a crumbling ruin, is across the street. Certainly worth an hour on your way to, say, the Frank Lloyd Wright houses in Oak Park.
Written August 9, 2010
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Taylor B
Chicago, IL8,421 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2015 • Couples
I grew up in Blue Island, a south suburb of Chicago, and only a few miles from the Pullman Historic District. In fact, it is located east of Cottage Grove Avenue from East 103rd Street to East 115th Street, east of Gately Stadium, where I spent many occasions covering high school football games during my 33-year newspaper career. So you can imagine my disbelief when I decided to make a pilgrimage to the historic Pullman community on a day when the Hotel Florence, one of the signature structures on the property, was closed for renovation. Don't make the same mistake. Call (773-660-2341) or e-mail sleepingcars@sbcglobal,net to be sure that the hotel has reopened. This is a landmark of Chicago history, like the Prairie Avenue Historic District to the north. George Pullman built this "company town" for his railroad workers in the 1800s. It was the first model, planned industrial community in the United States, a place to produce Pullman's famous sleeping cars. It uses historic structures and public programs to showcase 19th and 20th Century industrial society. The signature Clock Tower Administration Building and Assembly Shops and the four-story Hotel Florence give tangible evidence to the national and international influences of Pullman--on transportation, industrial design, architecture, labor, urban and town planning and landscape design. The visitors center offers historical displays and a short film. The website documents information about who lived and worked in the town. In addition, there is an on-site reading room, the Bertha Ludlam Library, which is a valuable community resource.
Written January 25, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

NorthernSpy
New York City, NY46 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2015 • Family
Took the first walking tour of the season in what's left of this intended worker utopia. Our guides live in the neighborhood. Be sure to watch the 2nd video after the tour- it's in the visitor center behind a little room divider- it gives a different and important viewpoint on subjects touched on in tour and gives some ideas of why this boss built "utopia" failed amid labor strife.
Written May 5, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

02wonderful
Tampa, FL52 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2015 • Friends
It's been on my "to-do" list for some time and we finally made it down to see the Pullman District. It's a lovely walk around the preserved buildings/homes and we hit a perfect Chicago day. (3/21/15) I called in and they recommended that we hit the Visitor Center first to get the birds eye view and a walking map. Glad we did. They have an old (80s) video you watch. In all fairness we did go down to Pullman to learn about the late 1800s so the old video wasn't the end of the world. It was quite good. My takeaway from the video was that Pullman came to Chicago as a contractor to help raise the buildings in downtown Chicago. Then enter the railroad boom to which he shifted his energy into building high-end sleeper cars. That I found interesting. I did notice they didn't talk too much about the dislike of Pullman and historically the Pullman Porters. They should be deeply included to tell the whole story. Maybe now since they have the National Park Designation (as of 02/15) the whole story can be told. The hotel was closed when we were there but from the outside it looks like it's spectacular on the inside. Next time. Worth the drive down from Chicago.
Written March 24, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

set2go52
Chicago,Illinois290 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2011 • Friends
A group of us recently had the pleasure of touring the Pullman area in Chicago. It is an area steeped with history. Nearly 1,000 of the town's original rowhouses and several major buildings are still intact and in various stages of restoration. This Pullman District is a designated National Historical Landmark and is well worth a visit.
Written August 20, 2011
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Carol R
Austin, TX126 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2015 • Friends
Pullman has just been designated a National Monument. The visitor center is informative and has a good video of the history and importance of the area. Call ahead and find out if there is a tour to take, if you visit - all the buildings were closed when we were there, and that was disappointing. Restoration is starting however, and that is exciting.
Written March 23, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Noel J
Evanston, IL458 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2015 • Couples
This area is a significant part of Chicago's history and its recognition is long overdue and richly deserved. The official visitors' center is in process and the Hotel Florence is being restored. There is still much more work to do with restoring this community but its supporters over the years have done a wonderful job of keeping it up.
Written March 20, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Showing results 1-10 of 52
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Pullman Historic District - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go (2024)

All Chicago HotelsChicago Hotel DealsLast Minute Hotels in Chicago
All things to do in Chicago
RestaurantsFlightsTravel StoriesCruisesRental Cars