Wicker Park
Write a review
About
Wicker Park is the former meca of the Chicago art community and location of the bi-annual "Around the Coyote" art festival. The area has experienced massive economic growth over the past few years and is now home to many boutiques, thrift stores, bars and restaurants and known for its “hipster” vibe.
Suggested duration
2-3 hours
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Tours & experiences
Explore different ways to experience this place.

Top ways to experience Wicker Park and nearby attractions

Detailed Reviews: Reviews order informed by descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as cleanliness, atmosphere, general tips and location information.
Popular mentions

4.5
123 reviews
Excellent
65
Very good
47
Average
10
Poor
1
Terrible
0

Taylor B
Chicago, IL8,010 contributions
Oct 2020
Wicker Park is all things to all people. One of the fastest rising and trendy neighborhoods in Chicago, it has been recognized as one of the hippest hipster neighborhoods in the country and widely known for its local culture, art community, nightlife, high fashion boutiques, cutting-edge gourmet restaurants and bakeries, European-style cafes, upscale independent grocers and artsy businesses. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places and designated as a Chicago Landmark District, Wicker Park is a convenient place to live for downtown workers due to its proximity to public transportation and the Loop. The area stretches from Ashland Avenue on the east to Western Avenue on the west, from Division Street on the south to the Bloomingdale Trail (or the 606) on the north. Historically, Wicker Park was founded in 1868 by Chicago alderman Charles Wicker. The Great Chicago Fire of 1871 spurred the first wave of development and homeless Chicagoans looked to build new homes. At the end of the 19th century, it became a destination for German and Norwegian immigrants. Many of Chicago's wealthiest brewers built mansions on Hoyne Street, which became known as Beer Baron Row. Today, Wicker Park is home to such trendy restaurants as Dove's Luncheonette, Small Cheval, Big Star, Schwa, Handlebar and Cafe Istanbul, from fine dining to tacos to Ramen to sushi to Cajun. Stay at the Robey Hotel or Wicker Park Inn or Ruby Room. Visit the 606, Farmers Market or Flat Iron Arts Building.
Written October 7, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

psudino
Weehawken, NJ3,744 contributions
Nov 2019
Was in Chicago for business (On the Miracle Mile of course) and this is where some locals sent us to get out of the touristy areas. We ended up at a so-so speakeasy (reviewed separately) but we really enjoyed the area while wandering around. When we can start travelling again, Chicago is a common destination, and this area will definitely be a place that want to dedicate more time to checking out.
Written October 16, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Taylor B
Chicago, IL8,010 contributions
Sep 2016 • Couples
Wicker Park is one of the fastest growing neighborhoods in Chicago. Located west of the Kennedy Expressway, west of Pulaski Park, northwest of the Loop, north of East Village and Ukrainian Village, east of Humboldt Park and south of Bucktown, Wicker Park has about 30,000 residents and is known for its local hipster culture, art community, nightlife and restaurant scene. The Wicker Park Historic District, which includes "Beer Baron Row," where many of Chicago's wealthiest brewers built their mansions at the end of the 19th century, is on the National Register of Historic Places and much of Wicker Park has been designated as a National Landmark. The borders of the Wicker Park neighborhood are generally accepted to be the Bloomingdale Trail to the north, Ashland Avenue to the east, Division Street to the south and Western Avenue to the west. The area was filled with Polish immigrants after World War II and noted Chicago author Nelson Algren lionized the Division Street strip in his books. The demographics of the area changed dramatically in the 1960s with the construction of the Kennedy Expressway. Polish-Americans moved out and Puerto Ricans and other Latinos moved in. Today, Wicker Park is best known for its numerous commercial and entertainment venues and a convenient place to live for downtown workers due to the proximity of public transportation. The neighborhood is extremely trendy with high-fashion boutiques, cutting-edge gourmet restaurants and bakeries, European-style cafes, upscale independent grocers and art galleries. In 2012, Forbes named Wicker Park the No. 4 hippest hipster neighborhood in the country. Property values and taxes have gone up, increasing wealth for property owners and making Wicker Park more attractive to even richer real estate re-developments. But Wicker Park retains its historic significance. Several mansions still exist on Beer Baron Row on Hoyne Street between Pierce and Schiller. The Joseph Schlitz mansion at Hoyne and Ewing stood until the 1920s. The area reminds of South Prairie Street, where many of the city's famous retailers and meatpackers such as Marshall Field and Swift and Armour built their mansions in the late 1800s. It's all a great part of Chicago's history. In Wicker Park, however, you get a feel for the old and the new.
Written January 10, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Andrew B
Los Angeles, CA38 contributions
Jun 2015 • Solo
Wicker Park used to be dangerous and awful. Then it became hipster and cool. Now its rapidly gentrifying. But make no mistake: this neighborhood is FANTASTIC. It is LOADED with delicious restaurants and bars, and there are many fashion boutiques as well. The park itself is just OK, spend your time walking around the perimeter roads (Division, Damen, North, Ashland ... Ashland is the least interesting) and the primary cut-through road (Milwaukee Ave). Take a little time to wander through the side streets, there are many older homes that are quite nice, plus a number of new constructions sneaking in alongside them (its a hot neighborhood, many people are moving there as of June 2015). You'll love it, do yourself a favor, go check it out.
Written June 24, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

santafefreak
Oakville,Ontario Can228 contributions
Apr 2013 • Friends
I found the shopping along Mag Mile to be quite dull; nothing I hadn't seen before or had access to in my hometown in Ontario. Thought I'd try walking through Wicker Park on my own and was so pleased that I did. Lots of little shops selling unique shoes, boots, jewellery, clothing etc. The area is great for walking; I felt completely safe and enjoyed the funky vibe. Check out Bucktown while you are there; it's just across the street! I spent a few hours one afternoon here and would recommend doing so if you aren't in the mood for the Magnificent Mile and the run of the mill shops along that strip.
Written May 15, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

MissLenore
Farmington Hills, MI410 contributions
Aug 2014 • Friends
We went here with some friends who had recently moved to the Chicago area. We came in to visit for the weekend. Wicker Park is a nice area with lots of trendy shops, restaurants, and bars. We really enjoyed the Myopic Books bookstore that was four floors of used books. We ate at Township and later at Inspirations Kitchen, which is just outside Wicker Park, closer to Logan Square. We also had doughnuts at Stan's Doughnuts, and they were sooo good!!! The next time I come back to Chicago, I'm going to make sure we come down in this area again. We were able to hop on the bus for part of our travels down to Wicker Park, and the buses are free (might seem obvious but it wasn't to us Michiganders). Nice place to spend the day.
Written August 24, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

wireless_in_CA
United States4,694 contributions
Aug 2020 • Family
We made a quick stop here to check out the fresh produce at the farmer’s market but there was a long queue to enter. I guess they were trying to limit the number of customers entering at the same time.

Besides the Sunday farmer’s market, we found a large fountain, not working, framed with trees and large potted plants. It was a nice place to sit down, relax and do a little people watching. Besides the shoppers the rest of the park was not as busy.

To the left was a large grassy area where a number of groups were kicking back on blankets. A sign advertised Covid-19 Softball but not exactly sure what that actually meant.

Behind the fountain was a statue of Charles Gustavus Wicker for which the park was named after. He was posing with a broom 🧹 and the plaque mentioned that he was always willing to do things that needed attention. one of which was sweeping the dirt floors in the local police station. Quite unusual but quirky.

We did not get to explore the surrounding neighborhood but will try if in the area again. Street parking was free in front of the homes fronting the park along N. Wicker Park Ave.

Written August 17, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Diane K
Venice, FL3,789 contributions
Jul 2017 • Couples
We took an architecture tour of the neighborhood. Many of the historical homes were built in the 1880s and 1890s. The park with Wicker's statue is a pleasant place with lots of people enjoying the statue and fountain. The neighborhood was bustling with people which was good to see.
Written July 31, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Emy M
Mexico City, Mexico28 contributions
Mar 2015 • Friends
Really enjoyed an afternoon in the 4 main streets of Wicker Park, a lot of food options, cafés where to work for a while, second hand shops, galleries, designer stores. You must go to the GIANT bookstore, it´s impressive! I missed the night life scene!
Written March 27, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Meredith M
St. Louis, Missouri26 contributions
Feb 2014 • Family
Was visiting Chicago for the weekend with 4 teenage girls who wanted to shop. They were interested in some of the stores on Michigan Avenue but really wanted an area with boutiques and vintage clothing shops. Checked TripAdvisor and was recommended the Wicker Park area, near Bucktown and were very pleased with our day! Within a 5 block area, we hit vintage clothing stores, upscale boutiques, a funky record shop, bookstore, lots of cool shoe stores (Doc Marten for one) and fun cafes. Although it was snowing all day, the shops were warm and inviting. And everyone came home loaded down with bags!
Written February 19, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.

Showing results 1-10 of 98
Anything missing or inaccurate?
Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing

Wicker Park (Chicago) - All You Need to Know BEFORE You Go

Frequently Asked Questions about Wicker Park

We recommend booking Wicker Park tours ahead of time to secure your spot. If you book with Tripadvisor, you can cancel up to 24 hours before your tour starts for a full refund. See all 4 Wicker Park tours on Tripadvisor