Museum of Tolerance
Museum of Tolerance
4.5
Speciality MuseumsHistory Museums
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
10:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Tuesday
10:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Wednesday
10:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Thursday
10:00 AM - 3:30 PM
Sunday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
About
The Museum of Tolerance is a human rights laboratory and educational center dedicated to challenging visitors to understand the Holocaust in both historic and contemporary contexts and confront all forms of prejudice and discrimination in our world today.
Duration: More than 3 hours
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from $20.52
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Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

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4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles172 reviews
Excellent
104
Very good
40
Average
12
Poor
7
Terrible
9

alexisrachelletx
Nashville, TN1,631 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
The Museum of Tolerance is different from every other Holocaust museum I've been to (NY, Israel, DC). It's hard to explain but basically you and any people that walk in around the same time as you walk through the museum watching videos. You stand in one area and watch a video then the audio moves further down, you walk a few paces and another video starts there, etc. It was interesting, because I'd never been to a museum that approached it this way and I did see some interesting footage that I don't think I'd seen before. But I didn't really enjoy standing without walking for so much or that we had to stay in a group or that there wasn't really anything to read or get more information about. It's an interesting concept, but perhaps a limiting one? We knew they closed at 5pm, and we showed up a bit before 3:30pm. We were told that they don't really recommend anyone starting after 3:00 but didn't really understand why! Now I do! It takes about 1.5 hours to do all of the videos with the group of people you're with. There's a bit more to the museum, but we didn't get to explore that as it closed at 5pm (strangely, the Anne Frank exhibit is open until 6:30 although the rest of the museum closes at 5). If you live in LA, then this is a fine museum to visit/take your children to. If you're traveling to LA and have been to other Holocaust museums in the country, I don't necessarily think that this museum is a must see. Interesting, but not a museum I'd recommend (certainly not over other Holocaust museums).
Written February 19, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Benjamin
1 contribution
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
I was surprised that there was no mention of the Holodomor or Palestine or other massacres committed by Jews. So they should rename it to museum of Jewish history. The references to civil rights leaders are also shallow in that they don't talk about Malcolm X like they talk about MLK. Being a Jewish museum, they have to welcome immigrants and discuss their plight from only one side. So, if you are Jewish and you want to be given a serving of confirmation bias, this is the place. If you are not, then maybe find different museum? It won't teach you about the Holocaust, any more than watching Schindler's List or another Hollywood drama will. They never discuss it with hard evidence and facts, just anecdotes.
Written January 5, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jessica T
Oakland, CA3 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2014 • Couples
Yesterday my boyfriend and I went to the Museum of Tolerance to see the much discussed exhibit on Anne Frank. The entire experience left a bad taste in our mouths.

For starters, I booked tickets online that morning for 3:00pm. We arrive at the museum at 2:50pm, get our tickets, and head upstairs to the exhibit. I hand my tickets to the guide on that floor, and they rudely tell us that our tickets are for 3:45pm (the lady upfront apparently couldn't find my reservation, even though I told her 3:00, and took it upon herself to just give me a later time without saying anything) and that two big groups were ahead of us, so we couldn't go in. So first we had to wait 45 minutes for our tour. I looked at my confirmation and sure enough, I had booked for 3:00.

The tour starts at 3:45 and we're in a group of around 25-30 people, most of whom are elderly. We slowly shuffle up a narrow hallway at a shallow angle. The exhibit is largely done on a series of screens no bigger than a normal television. And you have to walk to get to each screen which gives a presentation about 5-10 minutes in length. This doesn't sound too bad expect that if there's a group that big, a lot of people aren't going to be able to see the film. The entire exhibit is made up of narrow hallways, and my boyfriend and I were largely stuck at the back where we couldn't see anything and we were too polite to shove our way into the view. We hung back at the previous screen, but the whole exhibit is on a timer, we would have had to wait until the next tour group came to see the films. It seems ridiculous that they couldn't just have the screens on a continuous loop so that people could spread themselves out a little more. As a result, our money was basically wasted. I saw maybe less than half of the content that we'd payed for.

Lastly, the layout was awful and confusing. You are shuffled back and forth in the exhibit without rhyme or reason by the huffy staff. Like I said, there were a lot of elderly people on our tour, and they seemed to have trouble walking up the sloped entrance, and walking the narrow hallways to reach each screen, and we were expected to be able to stand for a very long time. It would have been much better to have one presentation on a big screen with chairs, and then allow people to see the rest of the exhibit at their leisure.
Written January 20, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

LarryBuellton
Santa Barbara, CA36 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jan 2014 • Family
We went there January 2014 and I was disappointed over all. Some staff were surly but there were some great displays and dramatic presentations. About 2/3 to 3/4 of the material delt with intolerance and savegery toward Jews throughout history. About 1/3 of the material and interactive presentations were about intolerance toward other minorities and people in general. The interactive materials were geared toward high schoolers.
My big gripe was that I expected a hopeful, tolerance encouraging presentation and it was just the opposite for the most part. 90% of the presentations described how intolerant some people can be with no information about all the great programs around the world that exist to encourage understanding, compassion, and tolerance.
Many of these programs exist in Israel and Palistine and strive against all the mutual hatred to bring mutual respect and peace. Not a word was presented about any these tolerance programs. Even the book store was devoid of the wonderful tolerance liturature that exist. My hero, Ebu Patel and his Interfaith Youth Core, was nowhere to be seen. Museum of Tolerance? I think not!
Written March 9, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

NWDiner999
Cornwall Bridge, Connecticut, USA31 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2014 • Couples
One would imagine that a museum meant to expose future generations to the horrors of the Holocaust would be somber, contemplative. One would be wrong. This is a propaganda theme park. At every turn, there's another screen with someone talking AT you. There are "interactive" screens designed to lead groups of children in study of modern-day terrorism, as if it is somehow related to the Holocaust. The entire structure is filled with giant groups -- tours -- of children, each with a guide or teacher of some sort. To go by yourself is difficult and unpleasant, starting with trying to get in, as other reviewers have mentioned.

Having bought general admission tickets online, my wife and I drove the half-hour to get there and were told that the "next" admission was 1:30. This was at 11:00 a.m. Reservations are "recommended." We next phoned in for a reservation, got a machine, left our details (as requested). We arrived, went through the ID check and car search, got to the desk, and, surprise -- no reservation. At this point I complained and the manager appeared. "Let them in," she said, warning us that 300 children would be present, as they were the last time we tried to get in. I asked an employee if it was filled with children every day, and she said yes. All the employees are not only curt but unfriendly, as though it were policy.

No map is given. No signs on the exhibits mark a preferred path, so we chose to walk through the museum avoiding the tour groups. At least five times, someone asked if he or she could "help us," the emphasis being on suspicion that we were somehow doing something wrong. "No, no, we're fine," I said. One man, glaring at us while leading a pack of kids, said, "You're going the wrong way."

Having been to museums all over the US and the world, I can only sadly report that this was the worst museum experience we have endured.
Written March 3, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

J J
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates61 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2017 • Business
It's not a museum so much as an onslaught of reminders that humanity can be horrendous. For education in the Holocaust one should be reading and watching documentaries, not using a one hour walk through as a substitute for education and critical thought. While certain themes were excellent, the concept is mixed up and somewhat unclear, though one can guess that it's meant to warn us against another Holocaust. The problem with that is that horrendous genocides still occur today and I wonder how many people actually walk out of this exhibit with solid plans of action. Leery of the fact that the ONLY Muslim representation I saw was negative. I would not allow my own children to attend and believe critical thought and actually travel is what grows a mind and heart. A 50 million dollar building with gift shops does not.
Written May 20, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kafreena
Philadelphia, PA335 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
Wow. What a horrible experience. We never even got in. Shouldn't a tolerance museum be happy to try and accommodate those who are interested and care about human rights issues? We were rudely told by the front desk lady that they were sold out of tickets for the day. We decided to just go into the gift shop because I never pass up a chance to buy a new human rights book so I can read and understand even more. While in there my fiancée had to go to the bathroom. Unfortunately, the only bathrooms are inside the area where you can only go if you have a ticket. He asked the front desk lady if he could use the restroom and she said to ask the security guard. He just shook his head no. I don't entirely mind dealing with rude staff at normal places but the TOLERANCE MUSEUM?! why don't you either hire better people or train them better?
Written February 16, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

chgo919
Long Beach, CA164 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2015 • Family
The Museum of Tolerance does convey the horrific information about the Holocaust. This is important to share. There's no denying that. However, we had a very disappointing experience. First, visitors must be aware that this is NOT a museum where you will be allowed to explore at your pace and take in what you wish. You will be controlled and directed. We were VERY put off by the aggressiveness of the first employee (Kenya) we encountered. She was stern in her tone and not welcoming at all. We wanted to linger for a moment to see the Simon Wiesenthal information, but were told "no" and directed to the start of the exhibit. Once in, the automatic doors open and then close behind you. You are in darkness and must listen to the recorded options that take you through. It's all very scripted. The unfortunate part is that some of the audio from one side of the exhibit leaks into your area as well. So you get distracted listening to what you're hearing and then the next portion. (Plus, there was a crying baby in the group before us...in the closed space, that echoed.) You see some images and are moved along to the next section. We did not like this at all. We were also disappointed with how much emphasis is on the Jewish experience. While it's very important, everything else seems to be a secondary issue. Little is said about Darfur, Armenia or other genocide. It's there, but literally gets a sentence or two. You get the feeling that it's bad, but there's no in-depth information. Further, modern day issues such as Matthew Shepard are addressed, but the situation gets about three paragraphs on the wall and nothing more. Videos show events such as the Selma to Montgomery March and school integration, but there is nothing nearby to explain it. If you aren't familiar with what you are looking at (or even who the major players are that are shown throughout), you are NOT going to learn from this video. There are not captions and nothing to provide insight. As you leave, there is a VERY cheesy futuristic (pseudo Star Trek) looking room where you can sit to be quizzed on events. It's all fine and well, but we had to wait for the looping video to restart and then the scoring screens didn't work. As we exited, we noticed the guy at the welcome desk just sitting with his iPad playing video games. In the gift shop, where we hoped to find books that we could read on various topics, we instead encountered a CD player blasting Bob Seger's "Night Moves" and the attendant singing along. Hmmm...not exactly the respectful atmosphere I expected while looking at information about Anne Frank and pondering a purchase of "Night and Fog." Finally, I think there is great opportunity lost here. If we're to make a difference, as this museum seems to stress, there is no information about WHAT would work and why. There is nothing that offers ideas or concepts on moving forward in a powerful way. We left, still stung by Kenya's attitude from the start, and then more of an emptiness because so much bad can happen in this world...but what can be done to make it better? We were first time visitors. I will not go again and do not recommend this venue. You do not get your money's worth.
Written July 13, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Hilma13
6 contributions
1.0 of 5 bubbles
The unfriendly security check was a bad start which got worse downstairs when we were unable to process our children's photos. An attendant said they had been having trouble with the computers. So we asked for our money back, which was a further unpleasant experience, the manager saying no refunds but the very nice woman on the till saying they did!!
More a museum of intolerance and not the kind of service I have been used to in the 20 years of visiting the U S!
Written January 19, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Sharron D
Melbourne, Australia289 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2013 • Friends
The Anne Frank Exhibition, a permanent exhibition, had only recently opened when we arrived in October 2013. We'd visited before and found the Museum's "Finding our Families, Finding Ourselves" exhibition, narrated by Billy Crystal, very memorable. We would have visited again just to see that, as new narratives are added. But the highlight of the visit was the new Anne Frank exhibition, and it is certainly a beautifully put-together experience.

Timed and narrated, and with helpful guides to assist, it is a combination of audio-visual materials, artefacts, and spaces that do more than just tell the story of Anne Frank and her family's experiences hiding in their secret rooms in Amsterdam. The diary "comes to life" as you see images of their home in Germany, their move to Amsterdam, the changing political situation, her father's attempts to get the family to the safety of the United States and the years spent in hiding.

The bookcase "door" to the room where a film recreates the space they lived in, gives a sense of both expectation and dread. To see the other objects on display -- the letters to and from Anne to those outside, the yellow felt Star of David which Jewish residents were forced to wear, and to hear the church bells replicate the bells Anne heard while in hiding, create a very strong sense of intimacy with the story. There is film footage of Anne and a narration post-war from one of her relatives.

Particularly affecting was the wall of neatly folded clothing that wraps around the entire exhibition, floor to ceiling. It starts out colourful and cheerful, with the bright coloured floral prints and patterns of children's clothes. As you travel through the exhibition subtle changes take place. The clothing becomes more subdued, then drab, before morphing into the grey stripes of the uniforms of those condemned to Auschwitz.

If anything seemed out of place it was the "interactive" element at the end of the exhibition. Touchscreens display a range of concepts taken from the diary on topics such as "valuing your family", "making the world a better place", etc. and encourage visitors to share their own reactions. The visitor reactions I saw displayed were hardly profound, meaningful or in keeping with the tenor of the exhibition and came close to devaluing and trivialising the experience. Not a good end. See the exhibition, and also the other exhibitions including the main holocaust exhibition; they are very good. Skip the equivalent of "twitter" responses at the end.
Written November 9, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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