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Address: Azuma, Kiso-gun, Nagiso-machi, Nagano Prefecture
Name/address in local language
Phone Number: +81 264-57-3123
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Great example of preservation in Japan

Tsumagojuku (also known as Tsumago) is a credit to Japan for its efforts to preserve its historical treasures. Walking through this town is as close as you can get to what it was... read more

5 of 5 starsReviewed 4 weeks ago
Allan L
,
Sydney, Australia
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189 Reviews from our TripAdvisor Community

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Showing 53: English reviews
Sydney, Australia
Level Contributor
53 reviews
37 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 29 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed 4 weeks ago

Tsumagojuku (also known as Tsumago) is a credit to Japan for its efforts to preserve its historical treasures. Walking through this town is as close as you can get to what it was like when this was a post town along the main thoroughfare between Tokyo and Kyoto. There are no cars or power poles; just a narrow road with... More 

Helpful?
1 Thank Allan L
Esher, United Kingdom
Level Contributor
208 reviews
63 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 126 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 15, 2016

Tsumagojuku is one of the old 'post towns' set up along the various roads throughout Japan over 1,000 years ago. As with many of the wooden towns it has suffered from fire and was rebuilt, to the original designs, in the 19th and 20th centuries. The town is the perfect place to either start or end a walk along the... More 

Helpful?
Thank DerrickJS
Colchester, United Kingdom
Level Contributor
21 reviews
10 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 3 helpful votes
4 of 5 stars Reviewed June 12, 2016

Amazing chance to experience the way Japon used to feel during the time of Samurais & Shoguns, mainly inhabited by businesses, and with a small museum but without being a "tourist trap"; well worth if only just to see another side of Japan and with friendly locals.

Helpful?
Thank Tom-Frenchy
Derbyshire, United Kingdom
Level Contributor
46 reviews
28 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 16 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 3, 2016

you must visit this quaint town while in Japan. the houses are all made of wood and so old. it is very traditional and unspoilt by tourism

Helpful?
Thank vhyde03
Level Contributor
51 reviews
13 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 8 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed June 2, 2016 via mobile

We did the nakasendo trail and Tsumago was our first stop. Beautiful old town,cleaned and tidy,great shops and beutiful old japanese houses. A trip to see old japan.Nice and quiet from big cities. The street is lit at night time.

Helpful?
Thank Vikash S
Beijing, China
Level Contributor
29 reviews
5 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 18 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed April 27, 2016

We've seen many small towns in Japan over the years and Tsumago is a very charming small town in a lovely area. It's small but just enough small stores and coffee shops to make it a nice stop for ~1 hour (or stay there). We stumbled on a small restaurant and their wagyu beef on a stick was absolutely delicious,... More 

Helpful?
Thank Sincyrity
Level Contributor
819 reviews
376 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 352 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed March 31, 2016

It's an amazing sight after the walk from Magome. The street stretches for quite a ways so keep going (the bus stop is near the end). The usual craft and souvenir shops plus some good cafes and snack shops. But mainly it's about the beautiful old-style buildings, and there will be plenty of other tourists photographing them.

Helpful?
Thank mrdom
Hong Kong SAR
Level Contributor
190 reviews
90 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 33 helpful votes
4 of 5 stars Reviewed March 24, 2016 via mobile

Well-preserved post town built in the Edo era with countless photo spots. Houses remain as how they were looked like centuries ago.

Helpful?
Thank Patrick T
Level Contributor
34 reviews
15 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 14 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed February 14, 2016

A charming town on the old postal route between Kyoto and Tokyo. It's worth staying o couple of nights to see the village outside of tourist hours and to enjoy the excellent walks in the area (Magome to Tsumago especially). By chance I was here on July 23rd and 24th which happened to be one of their main festivals. Everyone... More 

Helpful?
Thank ACSM11
Kopavogur, Iceland
Level Contributor
8 reviews
3 attraction reviews
common_n_attraction_reviews_1bd8 4 helpful votes
5 of 5 stars Reviewed February 10, 2016

We walked the trail between Magome to Tsumago. Beautiful trail that stops in this small Edo period post town. I loved exploring the little shops with different crafts. We also had a lovely lunch at Fujioto. Recommend taking the trail and stopping for a little while to explore this town.

Helpful?
Thank Sólveig G

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