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National Voting Rights Museum and Institute

65 Reviews
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National Voting Rights Museum and Institute

65 Reviews
Sorry, there are no tours or activities available to book online for the date(s) you selected. Please choose a different date.
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Susan wrote a review Mar 2020
2 contributions3 helpful votes
This museum changed my life. Because of it, I found out so much more about the history of voting rights in Selma and the sacrifices people made so that everyone could exercise their right to vote. The museum run by the National Park Service is fine---but this one is grassroots. The Interpretive Center is free, and this one is not--but that's because it's a non-profit trying to keep its doors open. After I came here, I knew I wanted to come back to live in Selma and volunteer, and I am doing that now. YOU NEED TO MAKE RESERVATIONS. The museum has a tiny staff--some volunteer like I am--so the doors can't stay open all the time. Currently, the museum is open when there is a tour scheduled--which is just about every day--but the times vary. So if you absolutely want to come, you need to call ahead. And be patient if someone doesn't answer the phone or call back the same day. Again: phenomenal museum, but skeletal staff. The best thing to do is to book a tour, but that costs more because you'll be talking with the museum historian. In the "Special Features," of the movie SELMA, you can get a foretaste of that tour and what there is to see in the museum. COME TO SELMA!
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Date of experience: February 2020
2 Helpful votes
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AlexTeacherTraveler wrote a review Oct 2019
Cincinnati, Ohio62 contributions22 helpful votes
This museum really brought home to me what mattered in Selma and to the community of Selma. I loved the size of the museum - not overwhelming - and the ability for the tour to focus on a) the voting history and b) who in our recent history made a positive impact. Walking the bridge? Gave me chills as I realized how the people must have felt on Bloody Sunday!
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Date of experience: September 2019
1 Helpful vote
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Tyrone S wrote a review Sep 2019
New York City, New York31 contributions7 helpful votes
Selma was the 2nd stop on my mom and I's Heritage Tour that I came up with for us to go across the South and see all these amazing historical sites that are so important to our heritage. Before we walked across the Edmund Pettis Bridge, we already planned to stop here at the Voting Rights Museum and I am so very glad we did. We took our time going through the museum and Mr. Williams (I believe) and Ms. Pearlie Walker who runs the museum were an ABSOLUTE JOY and they told us even more about the history and the purpose of this museum. Ms. Walker even showed us the picture she has of meeting President and Mrs. Obama when they walked across the bridge on the 50th anniversary of Bloody Sunday, in 2015. I saw a lot of amazing sites on this Tour but I STRONGLY suggest making a stop in Selma to visit this museum.
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Date of experience: August 2019
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Phil H wrote a review Jul 2019
Shipley, United Kingdom315 contributions67 helpful votes
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Most people have heard of and seen footage of the Civil Rights march from Selma, AL to Montgomery, AL, and been horrified by the images of marchers being violently attacked with batons and tear gas. However, it is quite another thing to actually visit the site of the start of the protest. It was a blazing hot day, and we were greeted by a wonderful young man called Columbus, who is the curator of the Museum, and whose uncle was one of the marchers. Columbus told us that his uncle, who was injured during the clashes, only passed eight months ago. He then introduced us to George Sallie, who is 90, and was one of the marchers. He was injured during the violence, but has forgiven those who hurt him and his fellow protesters. The Museum is situated at the far end of the Edmund Pettus bridge and contains several displays paying tribute to the leaders of the march and another details the history of lynchings in Selma. It was a very moving experience and the National Voting Rights Museum is somewhere everyone should visit.
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Date of experience: July 2019
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Fabreeze131 wrote a review May 2019
Chattanooga, Tennessee751 contributions81 helpful votes
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This just moved from the down town to across the river. They were still fixing things around the museum, but there was a ton of information, activists and spectator comments and foot prints. Take some time to visit this museum!
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Date of experience: April 2019
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