Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque
Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque
4.5
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The area
Neighborhood: Mehrauli/Qutub Minar
Home to the most beautiful step wells in the country, Jamali Kamali Mosque and a 200 acre park with facets of heritage peeping at you from every nook and cranny, Mehrauli is one of those treasure houses where the stories of the past can go on for years. Visitors need a whole day at the Mehrauli Archaeological Park to truly enjoy the opulent 1000-year old legacy of this neighbourhood. A great spot for picnics, this giant heritage park with Qutub Minar in the backdrop, has become a popular cricket playground among the local youngsters. Mehrauli has a number of artistic gems that have been converted into stunning art galleries & rooftop restaurants popular for a grand view of the Qutub Minar and large part of South Delhi.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.5
4.5 of 5 bubbles59 reviews
Excellent
30
Very good
23
Average
6
Poor
0
Terrible
0

PhilthetravellerXI
Avoca Beach, Australia841 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2020
This fascinating complex contains remains of the first mosque built in India going back to around 1200 CE. The complex of buildings, towers, minarets, and some crumbling ruins make for a great history lesson and photographic adventure. The site can be very crowded but is quite large and you can wander peacefully. We had a guide who explained the significance of the various sites and left time then to photograph the intriguing ruins. Do not miss the famous Iron Pillar originally built around 400CE and has a huge amount of metallurgical history. There is an entry fee but the whole trip, a short distance from the centre of Delhi, is well worth it
Written May 3, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Mike Flores & Jones Co.
Mexico City, Mexico486 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2017 • Friends
The Quwwat-ul-Islam is located inside Qutub complex, celebrating the Muslim conquest of India. This is the first mosque of all India, thus the significance of this place. It is built of red sandstone, gray quartz, and white marble, but is probably inspired by the iron "Pillar of the Law" that stands on the site. A very beautiful archeological site worth to stop by, you can get great shots (especially from the columns and its captions). No need to buy additional tickets or extra fees to enjoy it, its included in your 500 Rupees ticket, don't miss it!
Written June 15, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Satyendra Garg
National Capital Territory of Delhi, India6,946 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2014 • Solo
This was the first mosque built in Delhi, in 1193 AD, after conquest by first Islamic rulers defeating the Rajputs. Qutub ud din Aibak, a general of Muhammad Ghuri, who managed the Indian territory and forces after victory of Muhammad Ghuri on Prithviraj Chauhan, built this mosque, in the Qutub complex, out of the remains of Hindu and Jain temples. The columned corridor was later on added by Iltutmish. In the middle of the mosque is the world famous rust free Iron pillar made during Gupta dynasty rule. From the mosque one gets a beautiful view of the Qutub.
Written November 23, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

macedonboy
Glasgow, UK185,732 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2019
The Quwwat-ul-Islam Mosque is widely considered to be the first mosque built in what is now Delhi in the first of the Islamic conquests of the subcontinent by the Mamluk Dynasty. To be honest, there’s not an awful lot to see as what’s left is he reconstructed remains of the colonnade that would've surround the courtyard of the mosque. Worth visiting this part of the Qutub Minar complex as part of the self guided tour.
Written December 27, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MARGDARSHI
Mumbai, India1,331 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2015 • Couples
The Mosque`s name means `The Might Of Islam`& it is also known as the Great Mosque Of India.It is situated next to the more famous ancient Qutub Minar complex & completed in 1197 by Qutubuddin Aibak of the Slave dynasty along with the Qutub minar.The material for its construction were obtained with the destruction of 30 Hindu Temples & some of the structures like carvings,pillars & arches have been wholesale used here with certain repairs.Mud & bricks with decorated tiles were added to give the typical Muslim style with the mosque being constructed on a raised platform.The central arch`s `S`shaped walls have engravings with motifs decorated with the finest carvings & design display a major Hindu influence.Can see it with other ancient monuments in the composite complex.
Written April 11, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Dilip S
Vadodara, India1,111 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2014 • Couples
The third monument visited by us in the Qutub Complex was Quwwal Ul Islam ( might of Islam ) mosque measuring 65.2 m x 45.4 m constructed by Qutubuddin Aibak in 1198 using the materials taken from 27 demolished Hindu and Jain temples over the remains of a destroyed Hindu temple at the heart of the captured Rajput citadel of Quila Rai Pithora . The courtyard was surrounded by pillared cloisters with steps on the north , east and south sides taking one into the porches famous for their resplendently carved temple ceilings .

Inside the mosque , the sanctuary cloister to west was four bays deep , the colonnade on east had three bays and the remaining sides were content with only two bays . The arcades in this mosque constructed from the remains of the Hindu temples were of architectural significance . Columns of diverge design taken from diverse temples were ranged together , sometimes set one above the other , in rows to support a roof smuggled from a wrecked temple . The pillars boasted a range of Hindu iconography , from sculpted figures like kirtimukh and vyal , lotus flowers , bells and chains , to Kalasas spouting flowering creepers . There were numerous beautiful versions of kirtimukh , a stylized monstrous demon face motif .

We spent more than an hour documenting the intricate carvings on the pillars .
Written November 9, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

scvrose
Fiddletown, CA1,058 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2014 • Friends
One of the oldest mosques, it is in the Qubab complex. Much of it remains although there are several ruins as well.
Written December 22, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Kumar S
New Delhi, India420 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2017 • Solo
This mosque is located within Qutub Complex. The mosque is in ruins now but few parts are extremely well maintained despite the fact that it was built in 13th century!
Written December 27, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Ema Datshi
Northampton, UK1,251 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2017 • Couples
This is another of the attractions of the Qutab Complex and you'll only be able to see it by visiting the site including all the other sub-attractions.

The mosque dates back to the initial conquest of the region by the Muslims and the mosque was the first they built, destroying and plundering the carved stones from a couple of dozen older Jain and Hindu temples. You can see carvings typical of both religions incorporated into the pillars. Recycling at its earliest and most macabre perhaps.
Written January 20, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rumples
Tucson, AZ11,677 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2016 • Couples
As a history buff, I found the ruins of this 12th-century mosque -- the first in India -- to be one of the more interesting attractions in New Delhi's Qutub complex. The mosque, constructed with the remains of 27 demolished Hindu and Jain temples served as a symbol of the Muslim defeat of Hindu rulers. It stands below the site's star attraction, the 240-feet-tall, red-sandstone-and-marble Qutub Minar, a victory tower and minaret. And though the mosque has crumbled throughout the centuries, it still beckoned to me with a line of arches on the West and a hall of pillars, which display intricate stone carvings.

As I looked closely at the remains, I noted Hindu motifs, such as leaves and sculpted figures, throughout the structure because of the building material. The mosque's decorated pillars provided the biggest draw and we joined myriad other visitors, who were inspecting them. A lone 23-foot-high iron pillar, dating back to the 400s and likely also part of a Hindu temple, stands in the mosque's inner courtyard. The iron has not oxidized, showing the metalwork skills of Indians many centuries earlier.

Information signs in English proved to be most helpful as we explored what is left of the mosque.They helped me to envision how the mosque originally looked, and the beautiful Qutub Minar looming nearby was a constant reminder of the area's former purpose.
Written April 25, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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