Wat Khae

Wat Khae, Suphan Buri: Address, Wat Khae Reviews: 4/5

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Raintree_Thailand
Bangkok, Thailand2,816 contributions
For big tree lovers!
Nov 2020
This temple is rather non-descript, but there are several features alongside (some natural; some manmade) that make it an interesting place to visit. The main attraction for us was the giant tamarind tree, some 10 meters in circumference and reputedly to be over 1000 years old (I'm a bit skeptical). There is also a large banyan tree, with some Buddha statues artistically placed among the hanging air roots. And, apparently honey is a local delicacy and commercial product, and the temple has erected a giant honey bee (complete with someone astride the back) in the back of the temple. Can't say that I understand it, but it's definitely different!
Written November 28, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

David B
Rayong, Thailand9,813 contributions
Side Attraction
Oct 2017 • Friends
As Thai Buddhist temples go, Wat Khae is very ordinary and is not worth a visit.

However, it was mentioned in the Thai classical poem, "Khun Chang Khum Phaen", which is still widely read today. As a consequence the temple has established a park alongside the temple commemorating the poem.

This epic poem which has its roots in Thai folklore, is one of the most important works in Thai literature. Chang and Phaen are the leading male characters involved in a classical love triangle, competing for the hand of Wanthong. Their 50 year struggle to win her hand involves abductions, revolts, court cases, trial by ordeal, jail and treachery and the poem is full of heroism, romance, sex, violence, custard-pie comedy, magic and horror.

In the end the king condemns Wanthong to death for failing to choose between the two men.

Every schoolchild in Thailand learns passages from the poem, and it is the source of many songs, popular sayings and metaphors.

The park is home to an enormous, giant tamarind tree, which according to local legend, is the tamarind tree mentioned in the poem, where Phaen is taught how to magically turn tamarind leaves into wasps. There is a large notice alongside it declaring it to be one of the "Trees of Thailand" and is under Royal protection.
Written October 4, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Supamas S
Suphan Buri, Thailand7 contributions
Beautiful
Oct 2016
The main interest here is an old house. The house is a representation of an old style house of a charector ,Kun Pan,in a famous Thai literature called Kun Chang Khun Pan. The story is about a triangle love between 2 men and a lady.
Written October 26, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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