Kyaly Khat Wai Monastery
Kyaly Khat Wai Monastery
4

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles107 reviews
Excellent
27
Very good
55
Average
22
Poor
2
Terrible
1

Jacco S
Wormer, The Netherlands846 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Sep 2013 • Couples
This is a spectaculair monastery. We were there during the end the end of the monsoon and there were hardly any tourists. ( also very little rain) Our guide told us that when you're there during the season there are more tourists than monks (1200) So we could shoot beautiful pictures without tourists on it.
It is a nice ritual when all the monks line up to go and have there meal at.10.15 h. It's very diciplined and its a long long row. Very nice to see. So I warn you when you're there during the season, be prepare to meet "some tourists and some big autobusses"
Written October 11, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Princess_PAustralia
Australia13 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2015 • Friends
We were brought to this place by our lovely driver who showed us how to witness the midday meal time respectfully. Luckily for us, it being shoulder season there weren't too many other tourists.

We had no tours or drivers booked when we arrived in Yangon. The first person we met was Htain Linn who drove us from the airport to our hotel. He offered to drive us around - even to Mandalay, Inle Lake and Bagan. We politely declined, but for our last day in Yangon we decided to book Linn for a day trip to Bago. Linn was punctual, reliable, polite and honest. Although his English is a little limited we enjoyed chatting to this inteligent and enthusiastic young man. He took us to some lovely places - including this monastery- and shared his love for his country and culture.

You can contact Linn on 09 420307276 or email jamehtainlin47@gmail.com
Written October 23, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

bsorge
Jacksonville, FL856 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2014 • Couples
We arrived just before 11 when the monks file in order to have their meal. They walk in order with tourist on both sides and you give them gifts which they put in pots. They then file into their mess area and sit on floor and set while tourist take pictures all around them. You then should walk into the food kitchen which interesting. Tough life.
Written April 8, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

yipjcs88
Hong Kong, China9,965 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2019 • Solo
It is quite ordinary but it provides one with the experience of monks walking down a long walkway at11 am, to be bestowed by donors (rice or money, from mainly the locals). Tourists generally just take photos, but it is very crowded. I chose to go to the other end of the walkway to avoid getting pushed by the crowd.
Written February 26, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Suwatss
Bangkok, Thailand5,681 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2016 • Couples
Kha Khat Wain Kyaung Monastery is one of three largest monasteries in the country, located in Bago (หงสาวดี), former capital of Myanmar. It is famous and very popular for Thai people to come to make merit. However the highlight here is to watch the long line of monks and novices file out in the early morning around 10.30am for their daily round of alms. What's quite a sight to behold!!

Prior to the protests of 2007 there were over 1.500 monks here but that figure fell to just 400 today.
Written December 11, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

M W
San Diego, CA76 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2016 • Friends
The train ride to Bago was wonderful... a bit bumpy, but if you travel in 'ordinary' class at least one direction, a great way to interact with the locals.

The monastery is a 20 minute walk from the station, through the main market street. Just keep going, it will appear over a small rise a couple of hundred meters after the end of the market.

If you need help, the owner of the San Francisco Guest House is wonderful and always willing to offer advice -even to those not staying there.

At the monastary we chose not to take photos, and sat quietly on the sidelines instead. Turning the monks daily fast-breaking into a tourist attraction just does not feel right.

How would you feel if a busload of tourists from Myanmar came to a family dinner at your home and stood around in your diningroom taking photos of you while you ate with your family?

If visited with respect, a nice day trip.

Michael Wood
Munich, Germany

Written June 29, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Rockstones
Asia82 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Feb 2016
Visited the Kyakhatwine Monastery in Bago where about 4 hundred monks live while studying Buddha's literature. Each monk carried his own alms bowl and stood in a single line ready for their lunch. They walked in between 2 rows of tourists who offered them rice, gifts and cash. It was in deed a unique experience to witness monks collecting alms. Somehow I could not stop thinking… those in the front queue would collect the most donations. Tourists literally disappeared when they have nothing to offer to these monks. Those monks who were right at the back of the queue would collect only rice. Some even have to help themselves with the rice near the entrance of the hall. Why cant the tourists offer their gifts and donations to the Monastery? Tourists just provide rice to the monks?
Written February 20, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

John W
Chonburi, Thailand261 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2015 • Friends
This monastery is said to house 1,000 monks from very young to old. While the tourists make it a bit of a spectacle getting up close to the monks with cameras, it is quite an inspiring sight watching the procession of monks going for their main meal of the day. According to our driver, the monks eat twice a day unlike Thai Monks who mostly eat once.

As a tip if you interested taking pictures, you should wait for a few hundred to pass and then the visitors lose interest. A clear path is then created to watch the procession and keep a respectable distance from the monks.

Be forewarned, there are no shorts allowed or immodest blouses and no shoes or socks can be worn while inside.
Written December 5, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Hoa L
Cherrybrook, Australia117 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2015 • Family
We arrived to monastery just before the monks possession starting around 11am. There were 700 monks took part in the activities. Visitor lined up on both side of the hall way and offered foods and money to the monks. We joined in the activities, offering rice to the monks as they walk toward the lunch hall. They have to finish the lunch before 12pm and that will be their last meal for the day. It was quite emotional for us to take part in the activities. Great.
Written July 22, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

ECJUNE
Milan, Italy142 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2014 • Solo
Nice to see the monks studying in the big hall in the afternoon. Your guide will show you around and you will see the kitchen with huge cauldrons in which local people cook the food for the monks. You are shown the room in which they eat and the 'rice cooking' room, a sort of a strange kitchen where there are multi-level pans in which tons of rice is cooked for the monks.
Peaceful and quiet place. Very enjoyable visit
Written March 22, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Kyaly Khat Wai Monastery, Bago

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