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Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum

1,990 Reviews

Nagasaki Atomic Bomb Museum

1,990 Reviews
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Nagasaki Custom Full Day Tour
$237.12 per adult
Nagasaki City and Shimabara Peninsular Sightseeing Tour
$1,086.80 per adult
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7-8 Hirano-machi, Nagasaki Nagasaki Prefecture
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Nagasaki Full-Day Private Tour with Nationally-Licensed Guide
Cultural Tours

Nagasaki Full-Day Private Tour with Nationally-Licensed Guide

Explore Nagasaki with a nationally-licensed and experienced multilingual guide! Your guide will help you efficiently enjoy a full-day walking tour of Nagasaki and introduce both modern and traditional sides of this dynamic and ancient Japanese city.<br><br>Your guide will pick you up in the morning at your hotel in Nagasaki, or anywhere else at your convenience, and take you to visit Nagasaki's famous sites.<br><br>Along with atomic bombing of Nagasaki during WWII, this city's history features many prominent events. You can learn about this and other interesting aspects during this full-day walking tour accompanied by your privte guide.<br><br>Note*1: Please select your must-see spots from a list in the tour information to create your customized itinerary.<br>Note*2: The Nationally-licensed Tour Guide-Interpreter certification is issued by the Japanese government requires a good knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture and history.
$138.32 per adult
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Inoussa M wrote a review Jan 9
Nagasaki, Japan5 contributions
I visited the Atomic Bomb Museum of Nagasaki more than once. It shows the horror of the atomic Bomb and the need to get rid of nuclear weapons and the necessity of peace for a better world
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Date of experience: October 2020
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Safariholic wrote a review Sep 2020
Horsham, United Kingdom1,904 contributions481 helpful votes
+1
The scale model of the Bomb, time-lapse of the Explosion (ghoulish or what), the Display about the History of Nuclear Bomb Development, its Testing and their proliferation around the World since - they were good. The rest, I regret to say, was a big disappointment, as was the crowds inside (over-exited & out-of-control School Children, all in immaculate School Uniform comprising the majority). I have to stress, this was an exception - only time on 7 weeks. Being incredibly rushed, on a -round day Trip from Fukuoka, due to an error in Tour Planning, did not help, but this Museum compared very poorly with Hiroshima.
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Date of experience: October 2019
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Rumples wrote a review Sep 2020
Tucson, Arizona10,509 contributions3,481 helpful votes
A friend and I visited this moving museum on a weekday morning in early October. We had come to see how Nagasaki portrayed the effects of the Aug. 9, 1945, atomic bomb drop on the city. The curators have chosen to tell a story, presenting Nagasaki before the bomb fell; immediately after the explosion; and today. They weave explanations of historical details within the story and show what happened through photos, videos, artifacts and much more. The conclusion focuses on the need for peace and the end of nuclear weapons, made abundantly clear by the bomb's destruction of the city and the killing of at least 74,000 people. Those, who survived, would often have to endure physical ailments from the radiation and psychological trauma. As soon as I entered the exhibition hall, I felt uneasy, looking at a giant black-and- white photo of Nagasaki as it appeared before the bomb fell. That's because I knew what would be ahead for the thriving city. A recovered wall clock frozen at 11:02 a.m. soon appeared, marking the exact time that the horrors began. Displays feature English descriptions and include photos of the atomic wasteland that Nagasaki became, along with stories of that fateful day from survivors, including heroic rescue work. Artifacts damaged from the flash of heat range from a 14-year-old girl's lunch box with rice charred from the fire to six green glass bottles melted at the top and stuck together, which were found in a store's ruins. A helmet with the remains of a skull inside is one of the more grisly items. I found information on the bomb itself to be especially interesting. A life-size model of the one used on Nagasaki is displayed and called "Fat Man," because of its appearance. A video shows the military loading Fat Man and transporting it to the plane for the mission. There is also a photo taken from the plane that shows the mushroom cloud rising into the sky after the blast. We went through the relatively small museum in about 1 hour. It cost 200 Y (about $1.89 U.S.) to enter. A corridor leads from the museum to the adjacent Nagasaki National Peace Memorial Hall for the Atomic Bomb Victims. There is no fee to enter the Memorial Hall. Both are located near ground zero for the blast and the Nagasaki Peace Park. To reach the museum, we took the blue line to the Matsuyamamachi tram stop and then walked for about 4 minutes.
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Date of experience: October 2019
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KobeWorldtraveller wrote a review Sep 2020
Kobe7 contributions
This is a place everyone needs to visit to be reminded that we should never again wage nuclear war. The exhibits are clearly set out and English explanations and labels are extensive - unusual for Japan. There is also an audio guide in different languages. A very moving memorial to a terrible event.
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Date of experience: August 2020
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TWHK wrote a review Aug 2020
Hong Kong, China174 contributions84 helpful votes
It is a must visit in Nagasaki. The exhibits show the moment of the explosion and the aftermath. The presentation hits the heart of the visitors.
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Date of experience: January 2020
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