Kofukuji Temple
Kofukuji Temple
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4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles107 reviews
Excellent
30
Very good
58
Average
19
Poor
0
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0

hfot2 🌸🍁🌸
Vermont7,552 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2014 • Couples
After visiting Sofukuji Temple we ask the ticket man how to get to Kofukuji which is more or less at the other end of the long string of temples. The two maps, in Japanese only, posted at the front of Sofukuji are difficult to decipher.

It is a very very long walk but pleasant to be strolling in some back streets. This is a marginally earlier temple than Sofukuji (only by nine years). There are grand things to photo, although there’s a maddening tendency here to post signs right in the way of the best shots.

Again it is reminiscent of temples we have visited in China with interesting drum and bell tower. The grounds are well maintained and it is in a lovely setting. It seems to be only occasionally visited and we had the site to ourselves for most of our time there.
Written June 22, 2014
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Martina1888
Inverness, UK507 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2023 • Solo
A wonderful Chinese temple with striking red colour in Nagasaki. It's well worth a visit and I definitely recommend a visit if you're in the city.
Written November 18, 2023
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Ari
11 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2021
Beautiful temple with interesting inner worship hall. You can also enjoy a lovely and authentic green tea service!
Written April 4, 2021
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Oldjack
Greater Melbourne, Australia28,982 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
The origins of this temple date back to 1620 when Chinese merchants arrived in Nagasaki and needed a shrine to pray for safety. The original Main Hall was built in 1632 but was destroyed by fire and the current main hall dates from 1883 and is still impressive as were all the other buildings in the complex. The complex is definitely worth a visit but the ugly concrete buildings opposite built in the second half of the 20th century detract from this historical part of Nagasaki on the hill.There is a fee to enter.
Written October 5, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

tomizuta1953
Funabashi, Japan1,355 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2019 • Couples
Once you cross Meganebashi from the west side, there is a narrow slope road leading up to Teramachi-doori running north-south. We turned left to visit Koufukuji Buddhist Temple. I have found some saying that the estimated population of Nagasaki in the 17th century was 60,000 of which one sixth were Chinese, citing it from a description in the Nagasaki History Museum. The Chinese were allowed to live on the mainland as they were not Christians, whilst the Dutch were confined in the small island of Dejima. The Chinese had to outwardly show they were not Christians, which led them to found Chinese temples of which Koufukuji is one. The origin of Koufukuji Temple dates back to 1620 and the founder was the Chinese monk Shin-en. The second head priest was Mokusun-yojou who constructed Meganebashi. The third head priest Itsunenshouyuu was instrumental in inviting the Chinese high zen priest Ingen of Oubakusan Manpukuji Temple in Fujian, China. In 1634, Ingen came to Japan in his sixties, resided one year at Koufukuji and founded the Oubaku zen sect which is related to the Rinzai zen sect. He was given permission to stay in Japan and in 1661 founded Manpukuji Temple in Uji, Kyoto. Hence the Chinese temples in Nagasaki all belong to the Oubaku zen sect of Buddhism. We took a moment to marvel at the grand sanmon gate rebuilt in 1690 after the original gate was lost in the great Nagasaki fire of 1663. There are a couple of very interesting buildings with characters unseen in Japanese temples. First there is the Maso-dou. Maso is a goddess of maritime safety originated in China, the veneration of which spread to Taiwan and other areas outside of mainland China during its Ming Dynasty (1368-1644). It reminded me of the Maso temple in Tamsui, Taipei that I had visited earlier in the year. All Chinese ships carried Maso statues. When they landed, they would carry her to Koufukuji, and then back to the ships when they set sail. A Maso parade portraying this is held every year. Then there is the grand main temple building Daiyuu Houden. The original building was constructed in 1632 but was destroyed by fire. The current building was built in the Meiji era in 1883. I understand from the temple’s website that it “is built in a purely Chinese architectural style, and consists almost entirely of wood carved and prepared in China for export to Japan.” I was able to make out the Ruri-tou glass lantern hanging from the ceiling, the largest of its kind in Japan. It has been designated as a national important cultural property. Certainly worth the admission fee of 300 yen.
Written May 27, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

olafoomes
Amstelveen, The Netherlands1,660 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2018 • Solo
Fascinating Buddhist Temple built by Chinese merchants living in Nagasaki at the beginning of the 17th century. At that time it had a direct link to the sea travel by those Chinese merchants. For that reason you will find a big carved fish and a big carved whale within the premises of the complex. They are not in top condition anymore but they will give you a real sense of the historical importance of this complex.
What I found of special interest was the huge palm tree in the garden. A real beauty which has to be supported at some place to avoid that branches might break away. The whole complex is absolutely worth a visit.
Written October 27, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

mickknap
North Yorkshire, UK5,980 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2018 • Solo
Although on the tourist track around Nagasaki this temple/shrine is a lot more laid back and quiet , surrounded by some nice gardens and old ,very artistically designed gates/temples/shrines. Off the beaten track and in the old part of Nagasaki , very historical area ,there are other places of interest close by ,but not as peaceful and serene as it is here , well worth a visit ,and to take a rest whilst on your temple rounds , if you see one of the monks , ask him to sign your seal book with the temple scripture, as usual its 300 yen .
Written June 14, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Nancy154987
Crystal Beach, Canada41 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Friends
Against the backdrop of the busy city is this quiet haven on "Temple" road. While very understated in it's presentation, it is rich with history, and quiet corners to sit in peace.
Written May 11, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

gbltz
Bucharest, Romania126 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Apr 2018 • Friends
Take a walk along the river, admire the bridges, enjoy the art cafes and the small shops. The street behind is famous for the many old temples you can find there. This one is the largest and oldest one (1620). Peaceful, with a lovely small garden, not crowded. There is a small entrance fee. The other temples are free. Really a nice walk back into history.
Written April 25, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

S H
Cardiff, UK71 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2017 • Solo
Another impressive temple in Nagasaki. It was quite cheap to enter and there was some English information available too. Impressive structures. You may not need too long here, would be good to combine visiting it with walking to other temples nearby.
Written December 9, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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Kofukuji Temple, Nagasaki

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