Fudoin Temple

Fudoin Temple, Hiroshima

Fudoin Temple
4
Historic Sites • Religious Sites
What people are saying
hfot2 🌸🍁🌸
By hfot2 🌸🍁🌸
Quiet temple off the tourist track
Nov 2018
This temple seems to be infrequently visited and that’s a shame. It was only slightly damaged by the war, which in itself is a reason to visit. The wooden structure is the oldest of its kind in Japan, again another reason to visit. We were disappointed that the two story Culturally Important Niomon gate was under cover for restoration. We had to walk around it to enter the grounds but it was closed off from view. The temple compound was primarily a dusty piece of land with the cemetery rising up a small hill. The koi pond with small shrubs surrounding it was the only relief from the dry dusty appearance of the grounds. There was not much color in the trees, but that is not what brought us here although this was our 2018 koyo trip. The main hall (kondo), a National Treasure, was early, restrained, and elegant, a very graceful building. It was distinctly memorable for its severity and restraint. Unfortunately, it was closed, though we were able to look in through the glazed fretwork at the front doors. We were not able to see the ceiling, nor the Important Cultural Property statue of Buddha. The red and white bell tower, another Important Cultural Property, was photographable though the sun angle was not the best. Around the back of the compound is a small Inari shrine and the red of the shrine alongside the red in the maples was a lovely sight. Most of the other leaves on the temple grounds were dusty and dry. The whole compound is small, quiet and peaceful. We had the site to ourselves for much of our visit. As we were leaving a family arrived to visit the temple and to pay respects at the cemetery; two school girls stopped to look in the koi pond and take selfies, and a few young men raced through the grounds on bicycles. It’s relatively easy to get to from the Hiroshima station on the Astram Line or by bus also from the station. Exit at Fudoin-mae whether arriving by train or bus. If bus, take the elevator up and walk over the tracks and take the elevator down. Then follow the sign and walk down a short flight of steps from the main road to a parallel road. There is a sign almost at once pointing you to the entrance to the temple to the right. We headed off to the right, wandered around the uphill neighborhood for about 10 minutes until we came to a man who pointed us right back to our starting point. We saw the sign again and also saw a little road to the left which headed directly to the temple. You can visit Mitaki-dera in the morning, return to the station in Hiroshima for lunch and head out to Fudoin for an afternoon visit all in one day. I wish we had planned more time for Hiroshima to be able to spend a day walking the The Futabanosato Historical Walking Trail which begins at Fudoin. Next time!

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4.0
37 reviews
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10
Very good
18
Average
8
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James H
Brisbane, Australia13 contributions
Peaceful suburban place of worship
Jan 2020
As others have mentioned this place is a must-see for people wanting to understand the locals in Hiroshima. Not particularly hard to find, has a lot of small shrines in the one place, and doesn't seem to be overloaded with tourists.
Written January 13, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

hfot2 🌸🍁🌸
Vermont6,573 contributions
Quiet temple off the tourist track
Nov 2018
This temple seems to be infrequently visited and that’s a shame.

It was only slightly damaged by the war, which in itself is a reason to visit. The wooden structure is the oldest of its kind in Japan, again another reason to visit.

We were disappointed that the two story Culturally Important Niomon gate was under cover for restoration. We had to walk around it to enter the grounds but it was closed off from view. The temple compound was primarily a dusty piece of land with the cemetery rising up a small hill. The koi pond with small shrubs surrounding it was the only relief from the dry dusty appearance of the grounds. There was not much color in the trees, but that is not what brought us here although this was our 2018 koyo trip.

The main hall (kondo), a National Treasure, was early, restrained, and elegant, a very graceful building. It was distinctly memorable for its severity and restraint. Unfortunately, it was closed, though we were able to look in through the glazed fretwork at the front doors. We were not able to see the ceiling, nor the Important Cultural Property statue of Buddha.

The red and white bell tower, another Important Cultural Property, was photographable though the sun angle was not the best. Around the back of the compound is a small Inari shrine and the red of the shrine alongside the red in the maples was a lovely sight. Most of the other leaves on the temple grounds were dusty and dry.

The whole compound is small, quiet and peaceful. We had the site to ourselves for much of our visit. As we were leaving a family arrived to visit the temple and to pay respects at the cemetery; two school girls stopped to look in the koi pond and take selfies, and a few young men raced through the grounds on bicycles.

It’s relatively easy to get to from the Hiroshima station on the Astram Line or by bus also from the station. Exit at Fudoin-mae whether arriving by train or bus. If bus, take the elevator up and walk over the tracks and take the elevator down. Then follow the sign and walk down a short flight of steps from the main road to a parallel road. There is a sign almost at once pointing you to the entrance to the temple to the right. We headed off to the right, wandered around the uphill neighborhood for about 10 minutes until we came to a man who pointed us right back to our starting point. We saw the sign again and also saw a little road to the left which headed directly to the temple.

You can visit Mitaki-dera in the morning, return to the station in Hiroshima for lunch and head out to Fudoin for an afternoon visit all in one day.

I wish we had planned more time for Hiroshima to be able to spend a day walking the The Futabanosato Historical Walking Trail which begins at Fudoin. Next time!
Written August 18, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Tanaka33471
Hiroshima, Japan34 contributions
Important Cultural Assets in Hiroshima city
Apr 2016 • Solo
You shuld visit here if you're interested in temple.This temple is the A-bombed Building & never destroyed by A-bomb. So it's valuable to come here. It's easy to reach here by Astram or bus from center of Hiroshima city.
Written June 5, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Mimi P
24 contributions
The little temple in Hiroshima
Oct 2015 • Friends
It was not hard to find this temple. Easy to reach. Not much to see but still okay to seize the time.
Written April 3, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

CM K
London, UK173 contributions
Beautiful and tranquil
Dec 2015 • Family
This temple is one of the national treasures in Japan and had beautiful buildings. Make sure to look around and visit the back areas where you can absorb the tranquil, old-time atmosphere. I heard it would be absolutely wonderful to visit when the cherry blossoms are in full bloom.
Written January 8, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Peter S
Sidcup, UK143 contributions
A beautiful temple on the fringes of Hiroshima city
Oct 2015 • Couples
The Fudoin Temple forms the start of the Futabanosatio Historial Walking Trail, which means that it sits 3-4km away from the centre of Hiroshima itself. It is served by a nearby train station so you are able to get there by public transport. However, the walk along the river is worth it because you get to see more of the 'real' Hiroshima.

The temple itself is designated a National Treasure in Japan and it's definitely one of the more beautiful on the route. The gate is especially impressive to look at, especially when you consider that this was one of the few temples that survived the atomic bomb.
Written October 30, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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