Daming Palace Site Park
Daming Palace Site Park
3.5
Historic SitesArchitectural BuildingsParks
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Monday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Tuesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Wednesday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Thursday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Friday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Saturday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM
Sunday
12:00 AM - 11:59 PM

Top ways to experience Daming Palace Site Park and nearby attractions

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Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.


3.5
3.5 of 5 bubbles103 reviews
Excellent
24
Very good
38
Average
33
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SOH KIEN PENG
Singapore, Singapore6,671 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2017 • Solo
The Great Tang Dynasty was the most powerful, most magnanimous and most magnificent of the strings of imperial dynasties of Ancient China. Daming Palace was the iconic royal symbol and hallmark of the Great Tang Empire and the most impressive, the grandest and the biggest palace ever built in the history of mankind. It enormously occupied an area equivalent to 500 foot ball fields. Throughout the 289 years of Tang Dynasty rule, it was the royal palace and the administrative center for 17 emperors for 222 years.

The Forbidden City in Beijing and the Heilo Palace in Kyoto are modeled after the Daming Palace in their architectural design. There is no doubt that Daming Palace had her place as the ultimate jewel in the crown of the glorious Tang Dynasty.

Unfortunately, such a dignified architectural wonder was completely destroyed and devastated by rebellious forces at the fall of the Tang Dynasty. What we now see at the site was just the `empty' ruins site and a park.

For those who hope to see the architectural wonder of the ancient days at this park, you will be disappointed. There are directional signboards that will indicate to you at which site was once the Han Yuan Hall, the Xuan Zheng Hall, the Zicheng Hall or the Linde Hall or the Penglai island and so forth. But gone were the actual building structures. There are miniature model of the Palace that were displayed in showcase along the route but the actual structures are all gone. Only the Xuanwu Gate is rebuilt at the front entrance for an appreciation of the architectural design.

To better visualize how this Daming Palace was like, it is recommended to watch the documentary youtube video on Daming Palace and the Tang Dynasty before visiting the site to gain a better historic perspective of this park.

It was at this Daming Palace that ambassadors and envoys from Japan, the Roman Empire and the Persian Empire were hosted and tributes presented to the Tang Emperor. It was at this palace that the Imperial Examination for the county magistrates was once held and supervised by the Tang Emperor himself to ensure the most talented and the brightest were selected for such appointments. It was also at this palace that great creative literary poems, calligraphy, performing arts and writings of the finest quality and standard were born. It was also at this palace that sports like polo gained its popularity. It was also at this palace that Empress Wu Zetian the first and only Empress of China ascended the throne and brought Tang China to another golden era of achievements.

However, it was also at this palace that Emperor Xuanzong's infatuation with Yang Guifei led to his neglect of the state affairs and the start of the decline of the Tang Dynasty. It was also at this palace and at the decline of the Tang empire that the eunuchs started to grab political power in their hands and ordered the massacre and assassinations of officials within the palace.

The Palace is divided into the north and south sector halls. The north sector comprised halls meant for the luxurious relaxation for the royal families while the halls at the south was for the emperor to meet this officials for state affairs.

The current site Daming Palace Site Park may look like a recreational park for residents of Xian but the various sites re-conjure images of the historic past; the incidents that marked the growth, glory and downfall of a once great empire and the many stories of the royal families.

It is a pleasure mixing history of a great empire with a stroll in the park.
Written December 23, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Timothy R
47 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2018 • Couples
The park is located in the North of the city, beyond the old city walls by about 4 Km.
Various buses go there, given it's size they park has multiple entrances and each seems to be serviced by at least one bus.

We took the Number 16 from a stop next to where North Street intersects with Xixin Rd. 2 Rmb each and it dropped us of near one of the east side entrances.

The Park is large and free to enter, however the central core is only accessible an entrance fee, which includes the museum apparently.

However if your here to chill, people watch and walk then there is a very clearly marked circular route round the park core. You can walk it, takes about 2 hours non stop, 3+ if you wander and watch, take the road train, (50 Rmb each I'm told) or hire a 1,2,4,6 person cycle machine, costs vary. These are 4 wheeled multi-person pedal machines with sun hood and the hire points are about 2/3 of the way north on either side.

We walked, it was hot, (34c), so the occasional ice cream outlets were welcome. From the south end you pass a replica of the old building and enter a large parade ground, now used for big shows and similar. In-front of you is the current version of the old structures, which seem to act as protection or any remains and house the museum. If you want to enter, then the ticket office is to the right, although other access points exist and are opened as required. There is a permanent access point to the North.

If your here to walk only, then choose clock wise or anticlockwise and head accordingly. As you walk round there are many placards giving explanation in Chinese and English of what was at the location, a picture taken from archaeology and contemporary description is normally included.

To the North of the park is the lake you can walk round the northern side but to get to the southern side you would need to pay the fee etc... There are many remote automated spotlights and across the lake a large performance area which locals told us was always changing shape and structures depending on what was being presented.

It might have been the hot weather, but it was surprisingly quite for a Sunday and I am left wondering if the locals prefer a more intimate park somewhere.
Written June 10, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

MikeJuliya
Colombo, Sri Lanka683 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2017 • Friends
This place is good for relax with your family members. Bicycle ride is make this visit more fun. Recommended to visit
Written March 8, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Marie-Hélène M
London, UK373 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2018 • Couples
We spent an afternoon there to chill and hired bikes to view the whole park as it's huge (3 square kilometers).
You can also hire peddle boats at the lake.
We needed some rest so didn't bother visiting the museums inside but you can if you want (paying). Entrance to the park itself is free.
Written May 17, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Jwpgoh
Singapore, Singapore131 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Dec 2017 • Family
Many tourists would give this place a miss because it is just a public park. It is in fact to the contrary. Daming Palace is the second palace of the mighty Tang Dynasty. The palace site is many times (5 times, I think) bigger than the Ming and Qing’s Forbidden City in Beijing. Constaruction reportedly started during Emperor Taizhong’s reign. It was only completed during Emperor Gaozhong’s reign. While the foundations have been renovated, there are still some portions of the original sand and stone foundations. There are also museums there to learn about life during the Tang Dynasty.

For me, it was a personal achievement to be here. My ancestors who left China many years ago to make a new life in Singapore have also referred to China as ‘Teng Sua’ ( in Hokkien) or Tang Mountain, and Chinese as ‘Teng Lang’ or Tang People. It simply shows how much my ancestors look up to the Tang Dynasty.
Written December 22, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

zack2010
Kiel, Germany30 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Nov 2016
ok, if you do not like to walk this is not for you. The name says it already: it is a *big* park, in fact it was the (?) greatest palace ever built in history: 4km². On the surface you will have to read the (English) explanations to understand what you are seeing - there is not much left from the original palace, but the dimensions become clear from the reconstruction work. But even if you do not see very much you will be surprised by the dimensions of this palace and get a new respect for Chinese history and tradition.
In the middle of the park there is a new museum (entrance fee included in the park entrance) where everything is explained in detail and English. The entrance fee is also valid for the big door (not much to see, some excavations) and a smaller gallery with pottery and ceramics (really nice exhibition if you like this kind of things). I would not recommend this site for families with children - the distances are too long and there is not much to see for children.
Written November 6, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

TMHCollin
Kuching, Malaysia16 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
May 2016 • Solo
Roughly about 1/3 of the size of the old city of Xi'an, this park is huge. I visited this place on a windy day so there were hundreds of people flying kites here. You can easily purchase a kite from the numerous vendors if you're incline to join in. This place is divided into two sections: paid (access to museums and numerous sculptures) and unpaid (nothing much to see). Worth a visit if you have the time.
Written August 20, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Professor-Kunich
Charlotte, NC78 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2016
This is an enormous park just north of the ancient city wall, but there isn't much in the way of flowers, plants, or statues. Vast empty spaces mostly, and not many locals exercising. There are some museums on the grounds, available for a fee. The ruins of the ancient palace are virtually gone, with only some signs discussing what was once there. I much prefer the Xing Qing Gong Park.
Written July 1, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Thomas M
Shanghai, China11 contributions
2.0 of 5 bubbles
Jul 2013 • Family
Huge park, nice even if you do not pay the entrance fee for the palace area. The palace area mainly show the foundations of a Tang dynasty imperial palace and some modern structures to give an impression of size and shape of the palace.
However when my teen son needed to use the public toilet in the park we were seriously offended by the very rude attitude of the staff. First time experienced this in many years in China!
Written July 31, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Travelingmaven
Chicago, IL292 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2013 • Friends
I'm not sure what we expected when we decided to visit the Daming Palace - certainly not to see the base of a gigantic palace, with a large open space, and a large sandstone public building that was essentially empty when we visited. There is a scale model inside the building showing how the palace looked when occupied. It supposedly housed 10000 administrators during the Tang dynasty. Another scale model shows the 30000 structures cleared away to create the park where people walk and fly kites today.

The ruins are impressive for their size. Was it worth a visit? As far as we were concerned, not really. We understand there are no plans to rebuild the palace, although archaeological excavations are on-going. It's a huge site, more than 1 mile square, and free to wander (there's a 60 yuan charge to visit the museum of cultural relics).
Written June 23, 2013
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

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