Temple of the Five Immortals (Wuxian Guan)

Temple of the Five Immortals (Wuxian Guan), Guangzhou

Temple of the Five Immortals (Wuxian Guan)

Temple of the Five Immortals (Wuxian Guan)
4
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Monday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Tuesday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Wednesday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Thursday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Friday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Saturday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Sunday
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM
What people are saying
Douglas M
By Douglas M
Two Goes into Five Once
Jun 2020
Here in GuangZhou we’re emerging from the rainy season; we only have one downpour a day! I rummaged through TA’s places to visit for one that wasn’t too far, and we hadn’t visited. I despaired until I came across the Temple of the Five Immortals which seemed ideal for a sultry Thursday afternoon. How we’ve missed this remains a mystery! SWMBO looked at her bus app and determined a No. 124 bus would take us straight there. Knowing this SWMBO packed her bag with essentials such as tea, chunks of hami melon, and cracker biscuits to eat, and a jar of bug repellent to stop them eating us. We strolled down the road towards the bus station noting that a new fast-food place had opened specializing in BeiJing duck. A chap was loading an oven with ducks. SWMBO popped her head around the door, yes they were open for business, yes they did all the accompaniments, but no flyers or a mobile phone app yet. We’ll give this place a try definitely. A No. 124 was waiting se e climbed aboard swiping our travel cards for expected ¥2 (¥1.20 if you use the card enough) flat fare, and the usual temperature check from the driver. The drivers are now a bit fed-up with this and just wave it in your general direction. Off we went. By now I know the routes this bus takes. Past the main entrance to YueXiu Park (TA reviewed) which was amazingly still closed. Past the long closed and never to re-open and much missed Sywin Music Store. The bus turned right into Huifu West Road and SWMBO interrupted my daydream by telling me we get off at the next stop, appropriately called Huifu Lu. Most of the passengers headed towards the exit, not surprising observed SWMBO as it’s the stop for a hospital. Once off the bus we walked back along the road for a couple of hundred metres to the entrance to the temple which is set back of the road by a very nice forecourt. I won’t bore you with the palaver of getting admission in these extraordinary times, even with all the right apps on our mobile phones the chap on the gate was reluctant to let us in. His boss must be consulted pointing to the building next to the temple. SWMBO strolled off and returned with his boss. No problem and in we went. No admission charges. There’s plenty to see in the temple. There’s a couple of nice displays either side of the entrance. All the signs have a good English translation. As ever, look upwards to see the best bits as they tend to be unmolested. We wended our way through the temple towards the bell tower at back. We climbed the steep stairs to the top of bell tower. Unfortunately, the 4.5 tonne bell is just too out of reach to be given a bong. Mind you, it was only rung in emergencies. Be aware the stairs are steep and not very wide. From the bell tower we wandered around and looked at the footprints of the five immortals which is now a series of fish and turtle pools. Of course, I threw a small handful of food to the fish from my stock in my man bag, regretting that I didn’t have anything for the solitary turtle. Then we strolled and had a look at ‘The Trench’ which is a display representing GuangZhou’s role as the departure port of the Maritime Silk Road. Not much too see except for a very nice old photo of the port with a couple of paddle-wheel ships moored. Unfortunately, a guy had literally pulled out the plug and The Trench was now empty. I gather there was a few shallow and narrow trenches which acted as canals in the old trading part of the city. We availed ourselves of the ablutions which were very clean. Then sat and enjoyed the melon, crackers and tea while SWMBO rubbed insect repellant onto exposed arms. A bit more strolling and we were ready to head home. Plan for about an hour or two for a leisurely visit. Note, Huifu West Road is one way. Coming out of the temple we turned left and walk the three hundred metres to Renmin Road and hailed a taxi home as SWMBO was feeling rather worn out in the sweltering heat. If you turn right coming out of the temple you eventually (a kilometre or so) come to the southern end of BeiJing Road, the famous shopping centre (TA reviewed). Another note, Haifu West Road is the street for electrical and electronics components. If you need spare parts, you’ll get them here.

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Douglas M
Guangzhou, China1,973 contributions
Two Goes into Five Once
Jun 2020
Here in GuangZhou we’re emerging from the rainy season; we only have one downpour a day! I rummaged through TA’s places to visit for one that wasn’t too far, and we hadn’t visited. I despaired until I came across the Temple of the Five Immortals which seemed ideal for a sultry Thursday afternoon. How we’ve missed this remains a mystery!

SWMBO looked at her bus app and determined a No. 124 bus would take us straight there. Knowing this SWMBO packed her bag with essentials such as tea, chunks of hami melon, and cracker biscuits to eat, and a jar of bug repellent to stop them eating us.

We strolled down the road towards the bus station noting that a new fast-food place had opened specializing in BeiJing duck. A chap was loading an oven with ducks. SWMBO popped her head around the door, yes they were open for business, yes they did all the accompaniments, but no flyers or a mobile phone app yet. We’ll give this place a try definitely.

A No. 124 was waiting se e climbed aboard swiping our travel cards for expected ¥2 (¥1.20 if you use the card enough) flat fare, and the usual temperature check from the driver. The drivers are now a bit fed-up with this and just wave it in your general direction.

Off we went. By now I know the routes this bus takes. Past the main entrance to YueXiu Park (TA reviewed) which was amazingly still closed. Past the long closed and never to re-open and much missed Sywin Music Store. The bus turned right into Huifu West Road and SWMBO interrupted my daydream by telling me we get off at the next stop, appropriately called Huifu Lu. Most of the passengers headed towards the exit, not surprising observed SWMBO as it’s the stop for a hospital.

Once off the bus we walked back along the road for a couple of hundred metres to the entrance to the temple which is set back of the road by a very nice forecourt.

I won’t bore you with the palaver of getting admission in these extraordinary times, even with all the right apps on our mobile phones the chap on the gate was reluctant to let us in. His boss must be consulted pointing to the building next to the temple. SWMBO strolled off and returned with his boss. No problem and in we went. No admission charges.

There’s plenty to see in the temple. There’s a couple of nice displays either side of the entrance. All the signs have a good English translation. As ever, look upwards to see the best bits as they tend to be unmolested.

We wended our way through the temple towards the bell tower at back.
We climbed the steep stairs to the top of bell tower. Unfortunately, the 4.5 tonne bell is just too out of reach to be given a bong. Mind you, it was only rung in emergencies. Be aware the stairs are steep and not very wide.

From the bell tower we wandered around and looked at the footprints of the five immortals which is now a series of fish and turtle pools. Of course, I threw a small handful of food to the fish from my stock in my man bag, regretting that I didn’t have anything for the solitary turtle.

Then we strolled and had a look at ‘The Trench’ which is a display representing GuangZhou’s role as the departure port of the Maritime Silk Road. Not much too see except for a very nice old photo of the port with a couple of paddle-wheel ships moored. Unfortunately, a guy had literally pulled out the plug and The Trench was now empty. I gather there was a few shallow and narrow trenches which acted as canals in the old trading part of the city.

We availed ourselves of the ablutions which were very clean. Then sat and enjoyed the melon, crackers and tea while SWMBO rubbed insect repellant onto exposed arms.

A bit more strolling and we were ready to head home. Plan for about an hour or two for a leisurely visit.

Note, Huifu West Road is one way. Coming out of the temple we turned left and walk the three hundred metres to Renmin Road and hailed a taxi home as SWMBO was feeling rather worn out in the sweltering heat. If you turn right coming out of the temple you eventually (a kilometre or so) come to the southern end of BeiJing Road, the famous shopping centre (TA reviewed).

Another note, Haifu West Road is the street for electrical and electronics components. If you need spare parts, you’ll get them here.
Written June 19, 2020
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

PushExplore
Singapore, Singapore4,776 contributions
Always Nice
Oct 2019
I came here with some out of towners and it was a nice day to be outdoor. Weather was thankfully pleasant.
Written November 25, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

PushExplore
Singapore, Singapore4,776 contributions
Enjoyable Tour
Feb 2018 • Solo
The visit to the Temple of the Five Immortals was interesting, since we were quite enamoured by its name. It was also one of the things we saw while we explore the Temple of Six Banyan Trees, so we were in a mood to be out and about. The weather was perfect, which I believe also made a difference !
Written August 21, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

TJim60
354 contributions
Beautiful Temple Interesting Legend Pleasant Stop
May 2018 • Couples
We stopped here en route while walking from Liurong Temple (Temple of Six Banyan Trees) to Shamian Island.

This Taoist Temple was built in 1377 CE on an earlier 11th Century shrine to honor the Five Immortals (Wu Xian) and their gift to Guangzhou.

It has been renovated/reclaimed several times since then. In 1923 KMT local officials "sold" the temple to a local club to fund local military needs. In the 1980s, the temple was reclaimed and turned into a museum.

According to the legend, during the reign of King Yi of the Zhou Dynasty (so very roughly 2,000 years before the Temple was built), Guangzhou then known as Chuting was struck by a severe famine, Chuting's residents prayed for assistance. The Five Immortals came riding rams/ goats bringing with them the gift of rice cultivation as well as the promise of bountiful harvests forever. A promise that was kept according to local recollection -- at least until the 20th Century.

For that reason, GZ has the nickname "City of Goats" and the goat or ram motif is displayed elsewhere in the city.

At the Temple, there are representations of the Five Immortals (picture posted below), their ram steeds, a very nice garden, a bell tower, and massive bronze bell, reportedly the largest in Guangzhou. Note the resonator chamber below the bell in the picture I've posted which reportedly extends the range the bell can be heard quite far. Plus some other displays, e.g. carriages. A lot to see.

Also traces of what were explained as footprints of the Immortals which was the original motive for building the shrine and later the Temple on this site. Another picture.

We were welcomed warmly when arrived and had a very pleasant time.

Wu Xian Guan is only a kilometer from the Temple of the Six Banyan Trees.
Huai-sheng Mosque is even closer so you can combine all three sites in a single visit.
Written June 18, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

SrinivasanBrussels
Brussels30 contributions
Temple of the 5 Immortals: taoïst temple
Oct 2017 • Solo
To the South of the Huaisheng Mosque. The Five Immortals (Wu Xing) are the five chinese traditional elements: fire(huo), water(shui), earth(tu), wood(mu), metal(jin), as well as the five planets: Venus, Mercury, Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, the five seasons: 4 + 1 transitional, five phases/cycles: generatio & destruction + interactions, etc. It contains a bell from the Ming dynasty and has no clapper.
Written March 1, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Mark D
Penang Island, Malaysia1,301 contributions
An Historically Important Taoist Temple!
Sep 2017 • Couples
"History Buffs" will be enchanted by the shrine, its artefacts and "Historical Relics"!! The Temple was built about 550 years ago--- and honours 5 people-- presented as three males and 2 females astride their goats. Like some of China's history-- violence has taken its toll. But the old, massive bell (5 tonnes) still exists. There is also a pond with Koi and turtles.
Written September 26, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

Ashley
14 contributions
Beautiful temple
Feb 2017
I really enjoyed visiting this temple, it was very big and had a beautiful garden area with koi and turtles.
Written September 4, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

AliciaCecilia
Guangzhou, China211 contributions
Learning about old Guangzhou
Dec 2015 • Couples
We went there after visiting the old mosque nearby,Huaisheng Mosque,seeing both places gave us a good insight how life was there in the old times,people used to live on boats and conduct their business from there. The temple is well kept,has a statue of the five immortals that save GZ from famine ,the ones that came from heaven riding the famous five goats,and the only old bell tower in GZ,in the garden there is a display of old photos and a tribute to the old Poshan Ferry in that area the channels and the water now disappear. All in all was a pleasant short trip for a Sunday afternoon.
Written December 15, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

tombillinge
Trumbull, CT1,196 contributions
A vestige of a temple
Aug 2015 • Solo
How sad that the temple really doesn't exist any more. It is quite a nice space and the hall is pleasant, but it really is a shame that more didn't survive, as it is a crucial part of Guangzhou's mythological story. Good for temple and history buffs, but not for everyone.
Written August 8, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

James D
Guangzhou, China53 contributions
Pleasant afternoon trip
Mar 2015 • Solo
If you've been to a number of temples in China then you might get bored here. But if you're a history or culture buff then you'll probably enjoy it. The temple seems to be better maintained and is less crowded than some of the more famous Guangzhou temples like the Chen Clan Temple.

Beware fake monks on the road outside the temple who might ask you for money or to buy some charms or trinkets. It's a well-known scam.
Written May 18, 2015
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

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