Nengren Temple
Nengren Temple
4
What people are saying
Douglas M
By Douglas M
A visit to see Brick, Mo and Lazarus
3.0 of 5 bubblesJun 2022
SWMBO and I have walked past the temple at least once a week since I returned to Guangzhou in March. Most of the time the temple has been closed due to ‘covid’, but that didn’t worry us too much as the small pond at the entrance was the object of our devotion because in October 2021 that’s where SWMBO had put our three turtles Brick, Mo and Lazarus as they’d outgrown their tanks. A bit naughty of her as you’re not supposed to put your turtles or fish there but it’s a lovely place for them, and besides every few days SWMBO would go and feed all the turtles and fish. Of course, the pigeons and cats that frequent the entrance would also be fed. Anyway, yesterday’s mid-day weather forecast was dry between showers, so we headed off by taxi to the main gate of Bai Yun Mountain (TA reviewed). The main gate is a short walk up the road from YunTai Gardens (TA reviewed). After scanning the park’s location app, and then it was through the barrier using facial recognition we were in the park. We go to the park often, so we have an annual ‘ticket’ which is facial recognition. We strolled up the hill for a few metres and bought 10¥ bus tickets to take us up to the temple. A few minutes wait and we were aboard one of the little electric buggies that run throughout the park. A few minutes later we were at the temple’s entrance. SWBO had packed a bag to with a jar with a mixture of turtle food, dried shrimps, dried bread worms and fish food for the pond life, a steamed corn cob for the pigeons, and jar of cat food for the temple’s guardians. There are lots of red-eared sliders in the main pond along with the fish but I’m sure Brick and Lazarus are amongst them, while the much smaller tribe of common pond turtles have decamped to the smaller and shallower pond at the rear where there’s no fish. When I called ‘Mo’ one turned and looked at me, it was Mo. He got a few extra shrimps. After all the foods were distributed, we walked up the steps towards the temple. Note: the temple is not wheelchair friendly and there are many steps. There is a shop near the entrance for joss sticks and bracelets. There’s another shop on the second level for candles and more expensive necessitates. SWMBO bought candles and joss sticks to say thanks for my return to China, and our continuing good health, safe travel, and fortune. Not much has changed over the years except there are presently no monks. However, by the main shrines you can now donate with your phone, and your name and amount are listed for all to see your largess. SWMBO progressed onwards and upwards visiting saying a prayer at each shrine, I tagged along behind and admired the buildings. The temple is built into the side of the hill which constitutes a mountain in Guangzhou, hence the upwards part of the journey. Then we wended our way back down and availed ourselves of the clean toilets near the entrance. Finally, we walked down the road to the main entrance and got a taxi back to our humble abode as it looked like rain. We were right, as down it came just as we entered, and it hasn’t stopped for the last twenty hours . As an aside, No.5 expired here at home a few weeks after our visit in 2018. I'm still sad about not putting him in the pond.
Douglas M
By Douglas M
Pond Life
4.0 of 5 bubblesOct 2019
Just over a year has passed since our last visit to the temple and our fish have grown much bigger, so much so that No. 5 needs a new home. No. 5 was according the chap in the pet shop such an odd-looking goldfish that nobody wanted it. As I explained to SWMBO, it’s an odd looking goldfish because it’s a cat-fish! The weather on Monday was decidedly chilly at around 20C, but Tuesday was much warmer at 28C so we headed to the temple to check out the suitability of its fish pond for No. 5. We took a taxi to YunTai Gardens (TA reviewed) and then walked up the road passing under the flyover of the ShenHai Express Way, to the main entrance of BaiYun Shan. During the last year, the approach has been ‘landscaped’ with the shacks, market, car-park and detritus replaced by lawns and flowerbeds. Very smart! Note: there’s a nice bus station opposite the entrance to YunTai Gardens appropriately named YunTai Bus Station. All bus fares are ¥2, and no change is given. I suggest getting a travel card which covers buses, metro and even the tram. We entered the park, being a regular I’m on their facial recognition data-base, so I just present my ugly mug at the barrier where its scanned and then it opens and lets me through. For visitors you’ll have to buy a ticket, usually ¥5. Note: Have your passport handy just in case they want to check it. If you’re on the wrong side of 60, point at the dob and ask for a half-price ticket. Every little helps! Once in the park we strolled up the paths by the PuGu stream and road to the temple. The road is easier, but the paths are more interesting and picturesque despite all the steps. The path merges with the road about 50 metres from the temple entrance. There’s no entrance fee or id check for the temple so we just wandered in under the arch. The two characters on the arch read, from right to left fo jing, or Buddhist Place. There’s a small pond next to the arch and we checked for No. 5 but it is far too small with only inhabited by a few turtles and small fish. Then we climbed the steps to the big pond which is very suitable for No. 5. I’m sure he’d (I say he, but I’m not too sure) like it here even though I’m sure he wouldn’t be fed twice a day but he’d could swim fast and have more friends than a couple of boring goldfish (Oddjob and Sunday) and a couple of black plecos (Ronnie and Reggie) who keep to themselves. As I hung around by the pond and watched the fish and turtles, SWMBO carried on and up towards the temple to pay her respects. I caught her up as she was buying the necessary joss-sticks. While she used the joss-sticks I wandered around and climbed the steps to the highest part of the temple. They’re still building an extension at the highest part, rather slow for China but then again, I suppose everything has to be carried from the temple entrance. I didn’t think much had changed since last year. Surprisingly I didn’t see or hear any monks. After an hour we meandered down and again checked out the big pond and reckoned that it was suitable for No. 5 and maybe even in time for our three small turtles. Mission accomplished! We then set-off down the road and luckily got a taxi by the park’s entrance back to our apartment where our hungry menagerie of one cat, five fish and three turtles were demanding their evening meals.

Suggest edits to improve what we show.
Improve this listing
Tours & experiences
Explore different ways to experience this place.

Most Recent: Reviews ordered by most recent publish date in descending order.

Detailed Reviews: Reviews ordered by recency and descriptiveness of user-identified themes such as wait time, length of visit, general tips, and location information.

Popular mentions

4.0
4.0 of 5 bubbles8 reviews
Excellent
2
Very good
4
Average
2
Poor
0
Terrible
0

jackmoore93
Bath, UK845 contributions
5.0 of 5 bubbles
Mar 2016 • Couples
We had seen many temples in China on our trip but Nengren Temple in the mountains was extremely special. Surrounded my tall, green trees and nature, even hundreds of tortoises and fish in the pond. Of course tortoises are lucky for the Chinese so there's many of them. 100% worth visiting when in Guangzhou, it will blow any other temple you have seen in China out of the water
Written March 9, 2016
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Douglas M
Guangzhou, China2,729 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Aug 2018 • Couples
Over the years, SWMBO and I have been a few times to this temple which is in BaiYun Shan Park. As temples go, it’s not big or spectacular but it’s a very nice working Buddhist temple.

To get to the temple we walked to the main road (DaJingZhong Road) and caught the #233 bus, in fact most buses from the bus stop go to BaiYun Mountain. The usual 2 Yuan each fare was reduced to 1.2 Yuan because of our use of buses and the metro in the last 30 days. We each use a travel card which is essential for going around GuangZhou.

Note, on buses no change is given but you can use WeChat to pay by scanning your QR code. I must try this one day. Travel cards are easier and much quicker (important when getting on a bus) though.

We got off the bus at the BaiYun Ropeway stop, and then walked back along the road for about 50 metres. At the moment, it’s all rather chaotic in the area in front of the park as a metro station is being built to serve both BaiYun and LuHu parks.

To get to BaiYun park we had to cross the busy main road that separates Bai Yum Park and Lu Hu Park, luckily there’s a tunnel under the road but you have to search for the stairs down to it. Look for the blue sign with a downward pointing arrow. it’s not signed in English. We walked through the tunnel and just kept walking on the right-hand side of the road for about a kilometer or so to the main gate of the park.

There’s a many stalls and shops on the way to the market. I advised SWMBO to shop on the way back then she didn’t have to carry the stuff, but she was rather worried that there would be anything left when we returned. Thankfully there was, or I’d have never been forgiven!

Entrance to the park is ¥5, but only ¥2.5 for those aged between 60 and 65, and free for those over 65. You’ll need present your passport to get the concession.

There are toilets next to the entrance. Once through the turnstile you are presented with a long flight of stairs on your right or a path on you left. We took the path as it was a boiling hot day. It really doesn’t matter which you take, as they both end after a couple of hundred metres on the road to the summit.

There are signs in English for the NengRen temple. We trudged up the road for about 30 minutes stopping once to sit on a bench to refresh ourselves with slices and pear and peach which SWMBO had thoughtfully brought in her backpack.

The entrance to the temple is on the left as you climb the road, there are a couple of small elephant statues guarding the arch. On the right of the arch is an English information board about the temple.

Be aware there are lots of steps in the temple. We climbed the steps to the pool where there are fish, turtles, ducks, geese and the occasional water rat. Of course, I threw the fish some of the fish-food balls I keep in my man-bag. The ducks were enjoying the bread another visitor was throwing. Don’t be surprised if you’re accosted by pigeons and chickens, this is a popular place for them to be fed by visitors.

Onwards and upwards we went past the pool, I stopped and read the Head Abbot’s information board, then it was more steps and under anther arch and into the temple proper to the amplified sound of monk’s chanting. While SWMBO bought joss-sticks I climbed more steps to get a glimpse of the chanting monks. It sounded like there were dozens of them but there were only six. It’s amazing the effect I bit of reverb on the sound system can have.

Anyway, while SWMBO offered her Buddhist prayers I wandered around clicking away with my Pentax. As I said before, it isn’t a big temple but more is being built at the back. In fact there are small building works all over the place, not intrusive but you notice them. It’s a working temple so there are dormitories etc. for the monks.
There’s a couple of stalls selling Buddhist essentials, trinkets and knick-knacks for visitors.

As ever look up. It’s a pity the dragons on the gable-ends are netted over but the paint work on the facia boards is colourful.

We relaxed by the lion well and ate the last of the pear and peach slices and drank tea before wending our way down the steps and out of the temple, pausing to give the fish and ducks the last of my fish-balls. On the way down the road, we had to shelter for a few minutes because of a passing thunderstorm but a not unexpected sub-tropical event in August.

Then it was the shopping stalls and through the market where SWMBO bought fruit. We caught the #24 bus from the very nice new bus station. This dropped us off near Chang’s Cusine where we enjoyed dimsum and copious cups of tea to refresh ourselves after our afternoon excursion.
Written August 13, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Douglas M
Guangzhou, China2,729 contributions
3.0 of 5 bubbles
Jun 2022
SWMBO and I have walked past the temple at least once a week since I returned to Guangzhou in March. Most of the time the temple has been closed due to ‘covid’, but that didn’t worry us too much as the small pond at the entrance was the object of our devotion because in October 2021 that’s where SWMBO had put our three turtles Brick, Mo and Lazarus as they’d outgrown their tanks.

A bit naughty of her as you’re not supposed to put your turtles or fish there but it’s a lovely place for them, and besides every few days SWMBO would go and feed all the turtles and fish. Of course, the pigeons and cats that frequent the entrance would also be fed.

Anyway, yesterday’s mid-day weather forecast was dry between showers, so we headed off by taxi to the main gate of Bai Yun Mountain (TA reviewed). The main gate is a short walk up the road from YunTai Gardens (TA reviewed).

After scanning the park’s location app, and then it was through the barrier using facial recognition we were in the park. We go to the park often, so we have an annual ‘ticket’ which is facial recognition.

We strolled up the hill for a few metres and bought 10¥ bus tickets to take us up to the temple. A few minutes wait and we were aboard one of the little electric buggies that run throughout the park.

A few minutes later we were at the temple’s entrance. SWBO had packed a bag to with a jar with a mixture of turtle food, dried shrimps, dried bread worms and fish food for the pond life, a steamed corn cob for the pigeons, and jar of cat food for the temple’s guardians.

There are lots of red-eared sliders in the main pond along with the fish but I’m sure Brick and Lazarus are amongst them, while the much smaller tribe of common pond turtles have decamped to the smaller and shallower pond at the rear where there’s no fish. When I called ‘Mo’ one turned and looked at me, it was Mo. He got a few extra shrimps.

After all the foods were distributed, we walked up the steps towards the temple.
Note: the temple is not wheelchair friendly and there are many steps.

There is a shop near the entrance for joss sticks and bracelets. There’s another shop on the second level for candles and more expensive necessitates. SWMBO bought candles and joss sticks to say thanks for my return to China, and our continuing good health, safe travel, and fortune.

Not much has changed over the years except there are presently no monks. However, by the main shrines you can now donate with your phone, and your name and amount are listed for all to see your largess.

SWMBO progressed onwards and upwards visiting saying a prayer at each shrine, I tagged along behind and admired the buildings. The temple is built into the side of the hill which constitutes a mountain in Guangzhou, hence the upwards part of the journey.

Then we wended our way back down and availed ourselves of the clean toilets near the entrance.

Finally, we walked down the road to the main entrance and got a taxi back to our humble abode as it looked like rain. We were right, as down it came just as we entered, and it hasn’t stopped for the last twenty hours
.
As an aside, No.5 expired here at home a few weeks after our visit in 2018. I'm still sad about not putting him in the pond.
Written June 9, 2022
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.

Douglas M
Guangzhou, China2,729 contributions
4.0 of 5 bubbles
Oct 2019
Just over a year has passed since our last visit to the temple and our fish have grown much bigger, so much so that No. 5 needs a new home. No. 5 was according the chap in the pet shop such an odd-looking goldfish that nobody wanted it. As I explained to SWMBO, it’s an odd looking goldfish because it’s a cat-fish!

The weather on Monday was decidedly chilly at around 20C, but Tuesday was much warmer at 28C so we headed to the temple to check out the suitability of its fish pond for No. 5.

We took a taxi to YunTai Gardens (TA reviewed) and then walked up the road passing under the flyover of the ShenHai Express Way, to the main entrance of BaiYun Shan. During the last year, the approach has been ‘landscaped’ with the shacks, market, car-park and detritus replaced by lawns and flowerbeds. Very smart!

Note: there’s a nice bus station opposite the entrance to YunTai Gardens appropriately named YunTai Bus Station. All bus fares are ¥2, and no change is given. I suggest getting a travel card which covers buses, metro and even the tram.

We entered the park, being a regular I’m on their facial recognition data-base, so I just present my ugly mug at the barrier where its scanned and then it opens and lets me through. For visitors you’ll have to buy a ticket, usually ¥5.

Note: Have your passport handy just in case they want to check it. If you’re on the wrong side of 60, point at the dob and ask for a half-price ticket. Every little helps!

Once in the park we strolled up the paths by the PuGu stream and road to the temple. The road is easier, but the paths are more interesting and picturesque despite all the steps. The path merges with the road about 50 metres from the temple entrance.

There’s no entrance fee or id check for the temple so we just wandered in under the arch. The two characters on the arch read, from right to left fo jing, or Buddhist Place.

There’s a small pond next to the arch and we checked for No. 5 but it is far too small with only inhabited by a few turtles and small fish.
Then we climbed the steps to the big pond which is very suitable for No. 5. I’m sure he’d (I say he, but I’m not too sure) like it here even though I’m sure he wouldn’t be fed twice a day but he’d could swim fast and have more friends than a couple of boring goldfish (Oddjob and Sunday) and a couple of black plecos (Ronnie and Reggie) who keep to themselves.

As I hung around by the pond and watched the fish and turtles, SWMBO carried on and up towards the temple to pay her respects. I caught her up as she was buying the necessary joss-sticks.

While she used the joss-sticks I wandered around and climbed the steps to the highest part of the temple. They’re still building an extension at the highest part, rather slow for China but then again, I suppose everything has to be carried from the temple entrance.

I didn’t think much had changed since last year. Surprisingly I didn’t see or hear any monks.

After an hour we meandered down and again checked out the big pond and reckoned that it was suitable for No. 5 and maybe even in time for our three small turtles. Mission accomplished!

We then set-off down the road and luckily got a taxi by the park’s entrance back to our apartment where our hungry menagerie of one cat, five fish and three turtles were demanding their evening meals.
Written October 30, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Is this your Tripadvisor listing?
Own or manage this property? Claim your listing for free to respond to reviews, update your profile and much more.
Claim your listing

Nengren Temple, Guangzhou

All Guangzhou HotelsGuangzhou Hotel DealsLast Minute Hotels in Guangzhou
All things to do in Guangzhou
Day Trips in GuangzhouAmusement Parks in Guangzhou
RestaurantsFlightsVacation RentalsTravel StoriesCruisesRental Cars