Huadu Hongxiuquan Former Residence

Huadu Hongxiuquan Former Residence, Guangzhou: Tickets, Tours, Hours, Address, Huadu Hongxiuquan Former Residence Reviews: 3/5

Huadu Hongxiuquan Former Residence

Huadu Hongxiuquan Former Residence
3
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Monday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Tuesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Wednesday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Thursday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Friday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Saturday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
Sunday
8:30 AM - 5:30 PM
What people are saying
Douglas M
By Douglas M
An Interesting and Successful Trip
Feb 2019
During November of last year SWMBO and I attempted to find this site. I wouldn’t say we failed miserably as we found ‘his’ park and the place next door that used to be a museum about Hong XiuQuan. The people at the museum told us it had moved but directions we’re vague to say the least. We put further exploration on hold until after Chinese New Year. Yesterday was after Chinese New Year and SWMBO reckoned, after on-line investigation, she knew where the site was so shortly after midday we ambled around the corner to the bus stop and caught the #706 bus to HuaDu. The fare for the nearly one hour and a half journey was a paltry ¥1.20 each (usually it’s ¥2 but we’ve used our travel cards enough in February to qualify for the discount). The bus jolted its way north past the west gate of BaiYun Shan (TA reviewed) along the expressway to HuaDu. I suppose one day it will be an express way when all the roadworks are complete but now it’s one of never-ending construction sites. Mind you, you do get a glimpse of suburban GuangZhou and it’s not at all scenic to put it mildly. In HuaDu, we clambered off the bus at stop for XuiQuan Park. The stop is about 50 metres after the park’s entrance. The park is well worth a brief visit just to stretch one’s legs, a ‘comfort break’, and a look at the old and rather forlorn MIG fighter plane. The old museum next door is now a photo gallery, which is OK for a 20-minute visit. Now we had to find the stop for the #21 bus. We turned right out of the park and walked along past the XuiQuan Park bus stop and crossed the road. At the main road junction we turned left into Hongmian Avenue and crossed the road. The XinHu Building bus stop for the #21 bus is about 75 metres down the road. The #21 bus runs every 30-minutes and the fare is the usual ¥2. Now for the tricky bit! Take the bus all 20 or so stops to its terminus and there it is, Hong XiuQuan’s Former Residence! You end-up about 20 metres from the entrance. The journey is about 40 minutes. The bus goes past the entrance to ShiTouJi Mineral Park (TA reviewed – note the 706 has replaced the 713) which is guarded by two golden elephants before it heads off into the countryside. I gave the bronze cannons a good-luck stroke while SWMBO went to the ticket office to get a couple of tickets. No discount! Not even for an old, passport waving foreigner. The lady didn’t even believe me when I told her I was from Urumqi in XinJiang province. So, SWMBO had to part with ¥26 for two tickets to the residence. Interestingly, entrance to the new museum building is free. The building is so new that it doesn’t appear on on-line maps. Guided tours are available but I suspect they've got to arranged in advance, Clutching our tickets we strolled into Hong XiuQuan’s Former Residence. I’ll let you into a secret, this is not the original one. The original was burnt down sometime in the 19th century, what you now see was built in 1959. Nevertheless, it’s well worth a visit to see how rather well-off Chinese people lived around 150 years ago. There are a few rooms to peruse which look like stables, an old family temple and an old school room. Lot of signs in English. Plan to take an hour for a visit. Then we climbed the stairs into the new museum opened in 2014. The entrance is dramatic with a red carpet leading to a large gold statue of the lad himself. At the reception desk I picked-up a very nice brochure with an English translation of the detailed history of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Movement and especially Hung Hsiu-ch’uan (the old spelling Hong XiuQuan). Many exhibits have English signs but be aware that the Chinese names are in the ‘old’ spelling. There are two floors of exhibits in well-lit cabinets. Some surprises with a photo of Frederick T Ward the commander of the Foreign Rifle Corps, later I found out he’d been killed and is buried in China. A photo of Charles G Gordon commander of the Ever-Victorious Army who I presume from schoolboy history is ‘Chinese’ Gordon. Both of who fought for the Qing’s against the Heavenly Kingdom Movement. No refreshments but clean toilets. We took about an hour to walk around the museum. The museum closes at 5 o’clock the same time the #21 bus leaves for HuaDu. We retraced our outward journey and about two and a half hours later were at our humble abode. SWMBO pleased that’d we spent under ¥50 for an afternoon’s visit. Overall a bit of a trek but well worth it. I don’t suppose too many foreigners visit this place but it’s nice to see some off the beaten track of suburban China.

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3.0
15 reviews
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Douglas M
Guangzhou, China1,973 contributions
An Interesting and Successful Trip
Feb 2019 • Couples
During November of last year SWMBO and I attempted to find this site. I wouldn’t say we failed miserably as we found ‘his’ park and the place next door that used to be a museum about Hong XiuQuan. The people at the museum told us it had moved but directions we’re vague to say the least. We put further exploration on hold until after Chinese New Year.

Yesterday was after Chinese New Year and SWMBO reckoned, after on-line investigation, she knew where the site was so shortly after midday we ambled around the corner to the bus stop and caught the #706 bus to HuaDu. The fare for the nearly one hour and a half journey was a paltry ¥1.20 each (usually it’s ¥2 but we’ve used our travel cards enough in February to qualify for the discount).

The bus jolted its way north past the west gate of BaiYun Shan (TA reviewed) along the expressway to HuaDu. I suppose one day it will be an express way when all the roadworks are complete but now it’s one of never-ending construction sites. Mind you, you do get a glimpse of suburban GuangZhou and it’s not at all scenic to put it mildly.

In HuaDu, we clambered off the bus at stop for XuiQuan Park. The stop is about 50 metres after the park’s entrance. The park is well worth a brief visit just to stretch one’s legs, a ‘comfort break’, and a look at the old and rather forlorn MIG fighter plane. The old museum next door is now a photo gallery, which is OK for a 20-minute visit.

Now we had to find the stop for the #21 bus. We turned right out of the park and walked along past the XuiQuan Park bus stop and crossed the road. At the main road junction we turned left into Hongmian Avenue and crossed the road. The XinHu Building bus stop for the #21 bus is about 75 metres down the road. The #21 bus runs every 30-minutes and the fare is the usual ¥2.

Now for the tricky bit! Take the bus all 20 or so stops to its terminus and there it is, Hong XiuQuan’s Former Residence! You end-up about 20 metres from the entrance.
The journey is about 40 minutes.

The bus goes past the entrance to ShiTouJi Mineral Park (TA reviewed – note the 706 has replaced the 713) which is guarded by two golden elephants before it heads off into the countryside.

I gave the bronze cannons a good-luck stroke while SWMBO went to the ticket office to get a couple of tickets. No discount! Not even for an old, passport waving foreigner. The lady didn’t even believe me when I told her I was from Urumqi in XinJiang province. So, SWMBO had to part with ¥26 for two tickets to the residence.
Interestingly, entrance to the new museum building is free. The building is so new that it doesn’t appear on on-line maps. Guided tours are available but I suspect they've got to arranged in advance,

Clutching our tickets we strolled into Hong XiuQuan’s Former Residence. I’ll let you into a secret, this is not the original one. The original was burnt down sometime in the 19th century, what you now see was built in 1959.

Nevertheless, it’s well worth a visit to see how rather well-off Chinese people lived around 150 years ago. There are a few rooms to peruse which look like stables, an old family temple and an old school room. Lot of signs in English. Plan to take an hour for a visit.

Then we climbed the stairs into the new museum opened in 2014. The entrance is dramatic with a red carpet leading to a large gold statue of the lad himself. At the reception desk I picked-up a very nice brochure with an English translation of the detailed history of the Taiping Heavenly Kingdom Movement and especially Hung Hsiu-ch’uan (the old spelling Hong XiuQuan). Many exhibits have English signs but be aware that the Chinese names are in the ‘old’ spelling.

There are two floors of exhibits in well-lit cabinets. Some surprises with a photo of Frederick T Ward the commander of the Foreign Rifle Corps, later I found out he’d been killed and is buried in China. A photo of Charles G Gordon commander of the Ever-Victorious Army who I presume from schoolboy history is ‘Chinese’ Gordon. Both of who fought for the Qing’s against the Heavenly Kingdom Movement.

No refreshments but clean toilets. We took about an hour to walk around the museum. The museum closes at 5 o’clock the same time the #21 bus leaves for HuaDu.

We retraced our outward journey and about two and a half hours later were at our humble abode. SWMBO pleased that’d we spent under ¥50 for an afternoon’s visit. Overall a bit of a trek but well worth it. I don’t suppose too many foreigners visit this place but it’s nice to see some off the beaten track of suburban China.
Written February 28, 2019
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.

iamface
East Sussex, UK1,337 contributions
so far so good
May 2017 • Friends
so far so good. no special as all building already destroy and rebuilt that only remain some trees or some well inside this place. the museum got no so much stuffs to take much time for viewing.
Written May 26, 2017
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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