Memorial Hall of China Communist Party Third People's Congress

Memorial Hall of China Communist Party Third People's Congress, Guangzhou

Memorial Hall of China Communist Party Third People's Congress

Memorial Hall of China Communist Party Third People's Congress
3
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Monday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Tuesday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Wednesday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Thursday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Friday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Saturday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
Sunday
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
What people are saying
Douglas M
By Douglas M
Hard to Find but Worth a Visit
Aug 2018
In GuangZhou, there appears to be a memorial for every meeting that Sun Yet-sen attended! I thought we’d been to them all but this one had escaped my attention but not SWMBO’s, so it was camera and passport in my bag and off to the bus stop. We caught a #76 bus then a #864 trolley bus (brilliant things) to the DongShan trolley bus terminus just by DongShankou metro station. We could have travelled on the metro to DongShanKou (exit F) but sitting on a bus, especially a trolley bus, is much better than whizzing through an underground tunnel. As an aside, the modern trolley buses here can travel a little way even when their ‘poles’ aren’t connected. I reckon they must have a battery, which makes them not so immobile when the ‘poles’ become detached. Rather a good idea! Now the fun and games began! Everybody SWMBO asked just shrugged their shoulders. One more helpful chap suggested we disappear into the labyrinth of tunnels that includes DongShanKou, as it’s sure to be signposted. The tunnels graphically welcome travelers to ‘Tourist GuangZhou’ with posters and maps but unfortunately the 3rd National Congress Site doesn’t get a mention! Undeterred SWMBO asked another lady who waved her arms and said it was nearly impossible to find but she’d show us the way. A real hero! I traipsed along behind SWMBO and our guide as they walked along a street chatting and pointing in shop windows. Then SWMBO pointed to a brown tourist sign pointing to our destination. Success! Well, I suppose we could have eventually found it, but our hero just pointed at the sign and laughed, there was still a few twists and turns and with that we turned down another street packed with shops but the buildings were definitely looking older. Our lady hero stopped at a road junction and pointed. WeiXing contacts were exchanged and hands were shook then we were on our own but we soon found the site. My first impression was that this wasn’t for tourists, especially foreign tourists. This site was for Party Members, very much like the Peasant Movement Training Institute (TA reviewed), but a lot more difficult to find. SWMBO confirmed that the site is on a party member’s ‘must visit’ list. The museum is in a new building. No entrance fee or id check but bags are scanned. No flash photos, so away went the Pentax out came the Samsung mobile phone which is great for indoors. Then we were free to roam. The security lads were rather bemused to see a foreigner. I don’t think they get many. First downstairs in the basement, plenty of black and white grainy photos of 1920’s revolutionaries, their meetings and the buildings. Amazing to see how GuangZhou has changed in a hundred years. Then upstairs to the ground and first floors for more modern history and a few artifacts. The model of the sampan represents the venue of the first CPC congress (the real one is in BeiJing), the second was in ShanHai while the third was on this site. Note, this site not building. Photos (some in colour) and a few videos of all the famous and not so famous politicians are there. Be aware there’s no English except for a couple of letters about the revolution; lovely handwriting and the English is rather good. A very nice photo of Maggie Thatcher with Deng Xiao Ping got my seal of approval. There’s a flyer available from the information desk on the ground floor, but this seems only accessible after you’ve visited the basement! There’s no souvenir shop or café but there are toilets. If you can’t read Chinese or have a guide, then an hour at the most for the site. Outside is more interesting. There’s a plaque about the site which informs you that the house where the third meeting took place was bombed by the Japanese in 1938. You can stand on the stage like a party member and get your photo taken with the Chinese flag in the background. I looked around at the wonderful houses. This little area was and still is, exclusively for the rich house owners. Houses in GuangZhou are like hen’s teeth! There are a few new ones or let’s say old ones being refurbished being built in the area. SWMBO reckons the whole area is now subject to what I’d call preservation orders. The area seems popular for ‘fashion’ photos. A pity the area hasn’t been pedestrianized, presently it’s nicely paved but will soon be a mess with all cars that use it as a short cut. There’s a nice ‘1922’ house across from the memorial which is now an art gallery, shop and café. There’s another around the corner which is now a café and provided, albeit rather expensive refuge, from a brief thunderstorm. Both well worth a visit just to admire their original hand-painted tile floors. We wandered back towards DongShanKou, stopping to buy delicious roast pork and dumplings for dinner. We got the bus to the Peasant Movement Training Institute then the #76A bus back to the stop near our modest apartment.

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Douglas M
Guangzhou, China1,973 contributions
Hard to Find but Worth a Visit
Aug 2018 • Couples
In GuangZhou, there appears to be a memorial for every meeting that Sun Yet-sen attended! I thought we’d been to them all but this one had escaped my attention but not SWMBO’s, so it was camera and passport in my bag and off to the bus stop.

We caught a #76 bus then a #864 trolley bus (brilliant things) to the DongShan trolley bus terminus just by DongShankou metro station. We could have travelled on the metro to DongShanKou (exit F) but sitting on a bus, especially a trolley bus, is much better than whizzing through an underground tunnel.

As an aside, the modern trolley buses here can travel a little way even when their ‘poles’ aren’t connected. I reckon they must have a battery, which makes them not so immobile when the ‘poles’ become detached. Rather a good idea!

Now the fun and games began! Everybody SWMBO asked just shrugged their shoulders. One more helpful chap suggested we disappear into the labyrinth of tunnels that includes DongShanKou, as it’s sure to be signposted. The tunnels graphically welcome travelers to ‘Tourist GuangZhou’ with posters and maps but unfortunately the 3rd National Congress Site doesn’t get a mention! Undeterred SWMBO asked another lady who waved her arms and said it was nearly impossible to find but she’d show us the way.

A real hero! I traipsed along behind SWMBO and our guide as they walked along a street chatting and pointing in shop windows. Then SWMBO pointed to a brown tourist sign pointing to our destination. Success!

Well, I suppose we could have eventually found it, but our hero just pointed at the sign and laughed, there was still a few twists and turns and with that we turned down another street packed with shops but the buildings were definitely looking older. Our lady hero stopped at a road junction and pointed. WeiXing contacts were exchanged and hands were shook then we were on our own but we soon found the site.

My first impression was that this wasn’t for tourists, especially foreign tourists. This site was for Party Members, very much like the Peasant Movement Training Institute (TA reviewed), but a lot more difficult to find. SWMBO confirmed that the site is on a party member’s ‘must visit’ list.

The museum is in a new building. No entrance fee or id check but bags are scanned. No flash photos, so away went the Pentax out came the Samsung mobile phone which is great for indoors. Then we were free to roam. The security lads were rather bemused to see a foreigner. I don’t think they get many.

First downstairs in the basement, plenty of black and white grainy photos of 1920’s revolutionaries, their meetings and the buildings. Amazing to see how GuangZhou has changed in a hundred years. Then upstairs to the ground and first floors for more modern history and a few artifacts. The model of the sampan represents the venue of the first CPC congress (the real one is in BeiJing), the second was in ShanHai while the third was on this site. Note, this site not building. Photos (some in colour) and a few videos of all the famous and not so famous politicians are there. Be aware there’s no English except for a couple of letters about the revolution; lovely handwriting and the English is rather good. A very nice photo of Maggie Thatcher with Deng Xiao Ping got my seal of approval.

There’s a flyer available from the information desk on the ground floor, but this seems only accessible after you’ve visited the basement! There’s no souvenir shop or café but there are toilets. If you can’t read Chinese or have a guide, then an hour at the most for the site.

Outside is more interesting. There’s a plaque about the site which informs you that the house where the third meeting took place was bombed by the Japanese in 1938. You can stand on the stage like a party member and get your photo taken with the Chinese flag in the background.

I looked around at the wonderful houses. This little area was and still is, exclusively for the rich house owners. Houses in GuangZhou are like hen’s teeth! There are a few new ones or let’s say old ones being refurbished being built in the area. SWMBO reckons the whole area is now subject to what I’d call preservation orders. The area seems popular for ‘fashion’ photos. A pity the area hasn’t been pedestrianized, presently it’s nicely paved but will soon be a mess with all cars that use it as a short cut.

There’s a nice ‘1922’ house across from the memorial which is now an art gallery, shop and café. There’s another around the corner which is now a café and provided, albeit rather expensive refuge, from a brief thunderstorm. Both well worth a visit just to admire their original hand-painted tile floors.

We wandered back towards DongShanKou, stopping to buy delicious roast pork and dumplings for dinner. We got the bus to the Peasant Movement Training Institute then the #76A bus back to the stop near our modest apartment.
Written August 15, 2018
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of TripAdvisor LLC.
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Frequently Asked Questions about Memorial Hall of China Communist Party Third People's Congress

Memorial Hall of China Communist Party Third People's Congress is open:
  • Sun - Sat 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM